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Full text of "City Documents"

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LIBRARY OF THE 




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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

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http://archive.org/details/citydocuments19041905lowe 



CITY DOCUMENTS 



OF THE 




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MASSACHUSETTS. 



FOR THE 



YEAR 1904 - 1905 




5728 



LOWELL, MASS. 

COURIER-CITIZEN COMPANY, PRINTERS 
I906. 



EXTRACT FROM THE ORDINANCES OF LOWELL. 



Chapter VIII. — City Documents. 

Section 5. All City Documents (except the Rules and Regulations 
for the Government of the Police and Fire Departments) shall be printed 
in pamphlet form of the size of the Annual Report of the School Committee 

Section 6. All City Documents shall be bound together in one vol- 
ume, under the direction of the City Clerk, and three or more copies shall be 
placed in the City Library, and one copy in the library of the Middlesex 
Mechanics' Association, one copy shall be sent to each City of the Common- 
wealth, to the library of the Harvard College, the Public Library of Boston, 
the State Library, the Smithsonian Institute at Washington, and the Old 
Residents' Historical Association of Lowell. 



CONTENT 



1. Inaugural Address of His Honor, James B. Casey, Mayor, to the City 

Council, January, 1905. 

2. Municipal Register, containing Rules and Orders of the City Council, and a 

list of the Government and Officers of the City of Lowell for 1905. 

3. Seventy-Ninth Annual Report of the School Committee of Lowell, together 

with Forty-First Annual Report of the Superintendent of Schools, 1904. 

v 4. Auditor's Sixty-Ninth Annual Report of the Receipts and Expenditures of 
the City of Lowell, together with the Treasurer's Account, and the 
Account of the Commissioners of Sinking Fund, for the financial year 
ending December 31, 1904. 

5.' Thirty-Second Annual Report of the Lowell Water Board, and Reports of the 
Superintendent of Water Works and the City Engineer to the Water 
Board for 1904. 

6. Report of the Committee on Appropriations, 1905. 

7. Report of the Overseers of the Poor, with the accompanying papers, 1904. 

8. Reports of the Births, Marriages and Deaths, 1904. 

9. Report of the Board of Health, 1904. 

IO. Report of Superintendent of Streets, 1904. 



11. Report of the Chief Engineer of the Fire Department, 1904. 

12. Report of the Superintendent of Street Lights, 1904. 

13. Report of Board of Police for the year ending May, 1905. 

14. Park Commissioners, First Annual Report, December 31, 1904. 

15. Report of the Trustees of the City Library for 1904. 

16. Report of the City Solicitor for the year ending i904-'o5. 

17. Report of Inspector of Wires for the year ending February I, 1905. 

18. List of Jurors for the year 1905. 



Jucutgnral gu&dxtzs 



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J 905 




LOWELL, MASS. 

The Lawlkr Printing Company 

1905 



"(TRADEi[^|°7 J COUNCILS 



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Gentlemen of the City Council: — 

The dawn of a new year witnesses the birth of a 
new city government. Upon you, the chosen representa- 
tives of our citizens, is dependent the successful adminis- 
tration of municipal affairs for the present year. The 
responsibilities of your position call for your best efforts 
and to be ever mindful that the interests of the city 
must be your first consideration, irrespective of party, 
friends or personal inclinations. Your oath of office is 
not an idle one, — one to be thought of to-day and forgot- 
ten to-morrow. Every man sworn to the faithful per- 
formance of a public trust knows when he is doing" right 
and when he is doing wrong — the people also know, and 
are quick to reward faithful and conscientious public 
service. 

It should be our aim to provide an honest, economi- 
cal and conservative administration. The public servant 
who is more solicitious for his personal interests than he 
is for those of the city is soon singled out, and his ca- 
reer is short. Let your oath of office be your guidance 
upon all public questions. Dare to do that which you 



mayor's addrkss 



think is right, regardless of whom it hits. Remember 
that human nature is more or less selfish, that the man 
with a proposition to advance for his personal interests, 
cannot always see the line between public duty and the 
duty he expects you to perform for him. Point it out, 
however, and have the courage to say "no" when "no" 
should be said. 

Upon the wisdom and care exercised by you depends 
the prosperity of the community. There is not an act of 
your administration that will not directly affect every 
man, woman and child in the city. I have confidence 
that you gentlemen of the city council will perform your 
duties fearlessly and honestly, that you will be actuated 
by a purpose to give to our citizens the best service 
possible. Remember that the searchlight of publicity is 
upon you, that your official acts will be known and that 
you will be judged by those acts. 



TAXATION. 

The most vital question for your consideration, a 
question that is interwoven with every other question, is 
that of the tax rate. No other matter occupies so much 
of the thought and attention of municipal bodies. It is a 
problem which interests all citizens, and will continue to 
interest them while governments exist. The tax collect- 
or always has been regarded with unkindly feelings, 
sometimes with just cause, owing to the heavy burdens 
imposed upon the people. Unjust and unwarrantable 
taxation causes a storm of public indignation, and no 
reckless or extravagant legislative body can escape this 
condemnation. 



MAYOR S ADDRESS 5 

The tax rate of Lowell is too high. The people 
want a reduction — a good and substantial reduction. 
This can only be secured by careful control of expendi- 
tures by successive administrations. The tax rate is 
regulated by the expenditures of the departments to 
which money is assigned by your votes. In apportioning 
the amount for each department the committee on appro- 
priations plays an important part. In selecting this 
committee I urge you to place upon it men who will 
exercise the greatest care, and keep the department 
estimates down to the lowest figure consistent with the 
needs of each department. A niggardly policy is not 
desirable, but the people do expect a curtailment of un- 
necessary expenditures and an abstention from making 
loans for current expenses. 

For some years it has been customary to make 
"blanket" loans in December to enable various depart- 
ments to continue in running order. Some heads of 
departments expect these loans each year and this has a 
tendency to make them reckless in the handling of the 
people's money, because they feel that the city council 
will come to the department's relief in the closing days 
of the year. This method only adds to the large debt of 
the city by making an extra amount of annual interest 
and the payment of instalments of the city debt. Make 
it clearly understood that the amounts appropriated are 
for the entire year and that no further money will be 
allowed, unless in cases of exceptional exigency, or be- 
cause of some public calamity. 

The reduction of the city debt always should be 
kept in mind. There is a limit beyond which the city 
cannot go. Do not be satisfied if you keep within the 
limit, but try to keep as far as possible from it. • The 



d MAYORS ADDRESS 

farther we are from the limit the greater will be the 
borrowing- capacity of the city. The greater the borrow- 
ing capacity, the better we are prepared to cope with 
any emergency which may arise, and to do so without 
asking legislative permission to borrow beyond the limit 
established by law. 

A municipal corporation should be conducted on the 
same general principles as a business corporation as far 
as economy of expenditures and proper returns for 
every dollar expended. A municipal corporation is a 
social system, organized because man is dependent upon 
his fellow men. By co-operation the individual receives 
advantages for himself or his family, he has good 
streets, police and fire protection, and schools for his 
children. For these he pays a share proportionate to 
his wealth. His share of the expense is made out on his 
annual tax bill. If he receives a proper return for his 
assessment he is satisfied, if he does not he wants a 
lower assessment, lower taxes. 

The act of incorporation of a municipality is not in 
itself an asset. The city charter must be backed up by 
something more substantial than the paper it is printed 
or written upon. Money is not loaned on paper but what 
the paper represents. Back of every note or bond issue 
stand the people of Lowell. The property or wealth 
accumulated by the people is the pledge which backs up 
every financial obligation assumed by vote of the city 
council. Every dollar borrowed by the city, every dollar 
owed by the city is a mortgage upon every home and 
every business enterprise. High taxes work an especial 
hardship on the small property owner, and the annual 
tax bill adds to his financial burdens. High taxes 
mean higher rents and higher prices for the necessaries 



mayor's address 7 

of life. High taxes will demoralize business, paralyze 
our industries and prevent Lowell from taking- a higher 
place among live and progressive communities. 

You want to see Lowell go forward, not backward. 
Do your share. Courageously face the problem of taxa- 
tion, concentrate your efforts towards a reduction of the 
city debt, systematically regulate expenditures, exercise 
a watchful supervision over the city's business, and give 
an administration that will be an example and a guide for 
succeeding ones to- follow. 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

Ordinary City Debt Jan. 1, 1904 $2,408,756.79 

Borrowed during 1904 254,414.00 

Total $2,663,170.79 

Paid during 1904 345,790.79 

Total ordinary City Debt Dec. 31, 1904... $2,317,380.00 

Water Debt Jan. 1, 1904 $1,183,900.00 

Paid in 1904 21,600.00 

$1,162,300.00 

Total City Debt Dec. 31, 1904 $3,479,680.00 

Deduct Water Loans $1,162,300.00 

" amount exempted by Legislature.. 800,000.00 

$1,962,300.00 

• • $1,517,380.00 

Limit of Municipal Debt for 1905, iy 2 per 
cent of average valuation for last three 

years $1,790,038.40 

City Debt which relates to limit Dec. 

31, 1904 1,517,380.00 

Distance from limit Dec. 31, 1904 ^272,658.40 



8 mayor's address 

Total city valuation, 1904 $71,614,907.00 

Divided as follows: 

Personal $14,841,767.00 

Real Estate $56,773,140.00 

Assessed Polls, 1904 25,555 

Increase 996 



SINKING FUNDS. 

Full value of all sinking funds Jan. 1, 1905 $650,447.62 

Full value of all sinking funds Jan. 1, 1904 659,215.25 

Decrease during the year 1904. .•. $8,767.63 

Value of Water Loan Sinking Funds Jan. 1, 1905 $406,430.22 

Value of Water Loan Sinking Funds Jan. 1, 1904 373,505.74 

Increase during the 3^ear 1904 : $32,924.48 

Value of all other Sinking Funds Jan. 1, 1905 $244,017.40 

Value of all other Sinking Funds Jan. 1, 1904 285,709.51 

Decrease during the year 1904 $41,692.11 

Total decrease as above $8,767.63 

Value of the Hapgood Wright Centennial Trust Fund Jan. 

1, 1905 $3,268.93 

Value of the Hapgood Wright Centennial Trust Fund Jan. 

1, 1904 3,143.24 

Increase during the year 1904 $125.69 

During the year the Extension of Rogers Fort Hill Park Sinking 
Fund has been closed. 



HUNTINGTON HALL. 

A question that will confront the city council at once 
is the disposition of the Hunting-ton Hall problem. The 
hall has been destroyed by fire twice within a period of 



mayor's address 9 

about seven years. The first fire occurred December 
13, 1897. The hall was rebuilt immediately, and again 
destroyed by fire November 6, 1904. It would seem 
to be unwise for the city to again enter into an agree- 
ment with the Boston and Maine Railroad for the 
rebuilding- of Huntington Hall. It is my belief that the 
citizens should have a public hall, and I recommend that 
the city council immediately appoint a committee to give 
the matter careful consideration. 

The question of the abolition of the railroad station 
in connection with the hall is also a matter for your 
consideration. If the station were abolished a deed of 
the land might be obtained from the Boston and Maine 
Railroad, and the hall rebuilt on the present site. The 
initiative in this matter must be taken, however, by the 
city in the form of a petition to the General Court. The 
railroad has no voice in the disposition of this question, 
being obliged to maintain the station unless otherwise 
ordered by the Legislature, upon petition of the citi- 
zens of Lowell. If this station were abolished it would 
remedy the congestion of travel on the easterly side of 
the Middlesex Street Station. The tracks could be taken 
up on the Thorndike and Middlesex Street Crossings, 
and an entrance to the station provided from Thorndike 
Street, which would eliminate much of the congestion on 
Middlesex Street, fronting the station. The freight 
trains could be made up on the abandoned tracks of the 
old Boston and Maine freight yard, sent down to 
Western Avenue and along Dutton Street to the mills; 
and the great inconvenience of making up freight trains 
across our principal streets would be avoided. This 
question is one that should be given much attention. 
The abandonment of the Merrimack Street Station would 



10 mayor's address 

bring- about relief to travel at those points where trains 
are constantly crossing- and recrossing-. If, however, the 
sentiment of our citizens is opposed to such a chang-e, 
and they feel that the present station is indispensable, 
then I would urg-e you to take immediate steps to have 
the station rebuilt. 

I simply present these different phases of the Hunt- 
ing-ton Hall matter for your consideration, and feel that 
you will be able to bring about a satisfactory solution of 
the same. 



JUNKETS. 

A matter that seems decidedly wrong- and unfair to 
the citizens is the failure to restrict heads of depart- 
ments, boards and commissions voting themselves junk- 
ets from appropriations given to their departments. At 
times it is desirable, and a benefit to the city, that pub- 
lic officials be allowed to visit other cities to obtain spe- 
cial information, yet I question if department appropria- 
tions are available for such purposes without some su- 
pervising- restrictions. Criticism is directed against a 
city council committee if, in the acquisition of special in- 
formation upon a subject under consideration, they feel 
it necessary to visit other cities; and the privilege is de- 
nied such a committee unless on approval by the mayor. 
I would advise that restrictions be placed upon the 
different departments, which could be done by enactment 
of a proper ordinance. 



MAYOR *S ADDRESS ll 

SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 

The school department is the largest into which the 
work of the city is divided. It is also by general con- 
sent the most important, since the welfare, training- and 
education of the children and youth of the city must al- 
ways hold a place second to no other in the estimation 
of an intelligent public. The school system consists of 
59 schools in 55 separate buildings, with 289 school-rooms 
in actual use. Its enrollment of pupils in the year just 
passed was 12,223, and the number at present is 10,840 
in day schools, 2200 in high and elementary evening 
schools and 200 in the evening drawing and art schools. 
To care for these pupils the city employs 296 elected 
teachers for day schools, 174 for evening schools and 24 
for evening drawing and art schools. The sum appro- 
priated for the use of all classes of schools in 1904 was 
$300,000, and while the last figures for expenses are not 
all in as yet the department will live within its appro- 
priation. 

There is no denying that the expenses of the school 
department have increased faster in recent 3'ears than 
have the pupils. In the last ten years pupils in day 
schools have increased from 8,868 to 10,840, a gain of 
only a little over 22 per cent, while expenditures have in- 
creased from $230,000 to $300,000, a gain of 30 per cent. 
Modern times demand modern methods and equipments. 
Improved systems of ventilation require more coal and 
more janitors; the Kindergarten for children under five 
years of age is expensive, but the people demand it, and 
are, for the most part, willing to pay for it; commercial 
courses and manual training in the High School increase 
cost very largely, but they are of unquestioned value 



12 mayor's ADDRESS 

and no one would think of dropping- them or of impair- 
ing" their efficiency. In fact the public never complains 
of money spent on education provided that expenditures 
are judicious and appropriate. That expenses shall be 
judicious and appropriate is the proper demand of the 
public upon the school committee. 



NEW SCHOOLS. 

- 

A question for your immediate attention is the build- 
ing of new schools. Two years ago a site was pur- 
chased for a new grammar school in the Centralville 
district. It is imperative that this matter >be taken up 
at once as no one denies that increased educational facili- 
ties should be provided in that section. The failure of 
last year's city council to provide an appropriation for 
the school was caused by lack of harmony, and a con- 
nection of views upon the kind of a school needed, I 
trust that your honorable body will so act that work 
may be started at an early date. 

Increased school accommodations in the Highland 
district should be considered. Last year a temporary 
wooden addition was built to the present school. This 
is not satisfactory and better accommodations should be 
provided. 

The old pitched roof of the Green School is badly in 
need of repairs and to make these repairs it will cost 
$1500. I would suggest that instead of repairing the roof 
it be removed and another story added which would 
provide two additional rooms and an assembly hall. 



mayor's address 13 

PARK COMMISSION. 

In the nearly two years of its existence the Park 
Commission has performed excellent work in the man- 
agement of our park system. I especially commend the 
commission for the faithful and conscientious service 
they have rendered. I look forward to a continuance of 
such good work, which brings about an improvement in 
our public parks. 

In a city like Lowell too much attention cannot be 
given to our public breathing places where our citizens 
can enjoy freedom and recreation that only such places 
can provide. I recommend for your consideration a small 
appropriation to enable the commission to install athletic 
apparatus on the commons, and afford an opportunity for 
young men to secure physical developement. Such an 
addition to our park system I believe to be in the line of 
municipal progressiveness. 

J. would call attention to the desirability of acquiring 
the small tract of land fronting on Pawtucket and New 
Moody Streets, to be fitted up for a park, which can be 
done at small expense, and made an improvement to that 
section of the city. 

As a means of providing safe and healthy exercise 
for young people, I recommend that the Park Commis- 
sion be enabled to furnish suitable skating- surfaces on 
the North and South commons during the winter months. 
There are many vacant lots which also could be flooded 
for the same purpose with the consent of the owners. 
That these skating parks would be appreciated is evi- 
denced by the large number of young people who derive 
great pleasure at the city ledge on Fletcher and Bowers 
Streets where the street department maintains a surface 
for skating. 



14 MAYOR *S ADDRESS 

BUILDING ORDINANCE. 

I urge upon the city council the imperative necessity 
of adopting" a safe and suitable building- ordinance. It is 
strange that this matter has been neglected by past city 
councils. Our present building regulations are antiquat- 
ed, and there is practically no local supervision over the 
construction of buildings. The superintendent of pub- 
lic buildings is powerless, in many instances, to pre- 
vent evils that now exist in the construction of buildings. 
It is a fact that some building are so poorly construct- 
ed that a strong wind threatens demolition. 

I would suggest that a committee be appointed im- 
mediately to give this matter consideration, and that if 
an ordinance is reported that it not be pigeon-holed. It 
might be advisable to have an architect to assist the 
committee, and perhaps, a committee from the Master 
Builders whose advice and judgment would be valuable. 



CLEAN POLITICS. 

It is a lamentable fact that there is a growing ten- 
dency among certain salaried officials to interfere too 
prominently in the various political conditions that arise. 
This form of interference is oftentimes widespread and 
has a demoralizing effect upon clean and progressive mu- 
nicipal government. No public official has the right to 
use his office for the purpose of intimidating, or co- 
ercing any subordinate employe to do his bidding. A 
man employed by a department gives his service for the 
compensation he receives and is entitled to freedom of 
political convictions. A public official has no right to in- 



mayor's address IS 

terfere with any man eng-ag-ed in business, to the extent 
of intimating- that if he would bask in the sunshine of of- 
ficial favor he must, with complaisance*, do as he is told. 
There is altogether too much of this political coercion 
existing- in the City of Lowell, and it must stop. A man 
elected or appointed to public office has certain pre- 
scribed duties to perform, and if he places a different in- 
terpretation upon them to the extent that he uses the 
office for his personal ag-grandizement, and to the detri- 
ment of the city's interest, then he is unfaithful to the 
trust imposed upon him, and unfit to continue long-er in 
the public service. If it comes within my observation 
that a public official is using- his office to promote his 
own political power, which can only be done at the ex- 
pense of the city's welfare, I will consider it cause to 
relieve him of the responsibilities of his office and I will 
do so promptly, subject to your approval. 

BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

The manag-ement and control of the street and sewer 
departments are of the utmost importance. These de- 
partments spend many thousands of dollars annually 
and demand a high standard of efficiency and energy 
from those in charge. There is a growing- belief that 
these departments should be taken out of politics and 
placed on a more business-like plan. Constant ag-itation 
by those desiring- to secure control of the departments 
has a demoralizing- effect and works great injury. Under 
existing- conditions a g-ood superintendent is turned out 
of office as quickly as a bad one, and consequently there 
exists no incentive for a superintendent to fearlessly per- 
form the duties of the office. 



16 mayor's address 

As a remedy for this condition of affairs I would 
recommend the establishment of a board of public works, 
consisting- of three citizens to be elected by the. people, 
the term of office to be three years, the city civil en- 
gineer to be a member, ex-officio, in an advisory capacity. 
This board should have absolute control over the man- 
agement of streets, sewers and bridges. To my mind 
this method would allow a permanent and systematic 
laying out of work each year, more work could be ac- 
complished, and a superintendent would know that his 
position depended upon the ability and the competency 
displayed. Men employed in the department would be 
assured of steady employment. Each year this board 
could present to the city council its recommendations for 
the work to be done during the year, and appropriations 
could be made based upon the estimates presented. In 
this manner the department could live within its appro- 
priation, the superintendent could go ahead knowing what 
work was to be done; and all sections of the city would 
receive systematic improvements. If this recommenda- 
tion meets with your approval I would suggest that a 
committee be appointed to present to the General Court 
the draft of an amendment to our charter, with a clause 
that the referendum be attached to the act so that the 
people can pass judgment upon it. 



STREET DEPARTMENT. 

For the paving of heavily traveled streets I would 
recommend the use of granite blocks, of uniform size, 
laid on a concrete base and filled in with pitch tar 



mayor's address 17 

and crushed stone. This kind of paving- seems to be the 
most permanent and desirable that can be used. This 
paving- can be laid by our own city employees without 
importation of outside labor. 

Owing" to the extensive use of concrete for sidewalks 
a municipal concrete plant would seem to be a necessity. 
It can be established for about $1000 and will save the 
city large sums annually. 

The almost yearly replanking of Central bridge is a 
source of annoyance and extravagance which could be 
avoided by laying - some kind of permanent paving, pro- 
vided the bridg-e can sustain it. 

I recommend that trap rock be used for the surfac- 
ing of much traveled streets. In the near future the 
city will be called upon to provide stone for the macadam- 
izing- of streets, as the Carney Ledg-e, so called, in 
Moody Street will hardly last another season; and, unless 
it is proposed to sink the Fletcher Street ledg-e to a low- 
er level than at present, the city will be without proper 
material for macadamizing-, 

I sug-g-est a continuance of resetting- edg-estones and 
repaving- sidewalks in a manner to bring" them up to 
date. 



BAND CONCERTS. 

I recommend that $700 be set aside at the beginning 
of the year for municipal band concerts during- the sum- 
mer months. It mig-ht be advisable to have several con- 
certs on the common on Thursday afternoons so as to 
give women and children an opportunity to enjoy them, 
they, perhaps, finding it inconvenient to attend evening 
concerts. 



18 mayor's address 

NEW INDUSTRIES. 

Lowell always has been noted as a manufacturing- 
center. This is a desirable condition for any community, 
as the success of industrial enterprises means the success 
of the place in which they are located. Our city has 
made steady progress along industrial lines, but with our 
unexcelled advantages there is room for further growth. 
Every new enterprise will add to the taxable, property of 
the city, will open a wider field for the employment of 
labor, place more money in circulation, benefit our mer- 
chants and owners of real estate, and add to the general 
prosperity of the city. 

No enterprise, however small, should be ignored. 
Any business that gives employment at good wag-es 
should be encourag-ed. The city council should take an 
active interest in securing- new industries for Lowell, and 
it was for this purpose the committee on industries was 
formed. This committee can be made a most important 
one and I urge the members of it to make efforts to add 
to our manufacturing- enterprises. I shall do all I can to 
induce manufacturers to locate here and in doing- so will 
act in hearty co-operation with the committee on industries. 



BOARD OF OVERSEERS OF POOR. 

The care of the poor, the providing of relief for the 
sick and infirm who are unable to care for themselves, is 
a condition that confronts every municipality. That too 
much politics is injected into this department, that greater 
retrenchment and economy in expenditures could be se- 
cured, and that those in charge are hampered in the per 



mayor's address 19 

formance of their duties are conditions known to exist. I 
do not criticize the present overseers of the poor, but 
condemn the system that allows so much abuse of this 
department and so many evils to exist. If there is a de- 
partment that should be removed from political influence 
it is certainly this department, and yet we find a far 
different condition of affairs existing - . 

I recommend the abolition of the board of overseers 
of the poor, and the creation of a board of three citizens 
of unquestioned integrity and honesty to be appointed by 
the mayor, with a tenure of office of not less than three 
years, they to have entire control and care of the pauper 
department. This change would bring about a reduction 
in expenditures, ensure a higher standard of efficiency 
and eliminate the baneful effects of changing political 
conditions. The officials in charge could perform their 
duties fearlessly and exercise their judgment to the 
betterment of the condition of the poor entrusted to their 
care. If this recommendation meets with your approval, 
I would suggest that in the act to be presented to the 
General Court, the referendum be attached. 



CONCLUSION. 

In conclusion let me say to you, Gentlemen of the 
city Government, that the greater responsibility rests up- 
on you to meet the many questions that will arise during 
the year. Remember well the solemn oath you have just 
taken to perform you duties to the best of your know- 
ledge and ability. 

As chief executive of the city I will gladly and will- 
ingly co-operate with you in your efforts to do what is 



20 mayor's address 

best for the interests of the city. Let us try to make a 
greater and a better Lowell. Let us be progressive and 
up-to-date. Remember that the very foundation of all 
government is today and always will be, "the greatest 
good to the greatest number." 

Let there be no favoritism, treat all citizens and in- 
terests squarely and alike and if we do this I do not 
fear, and gentlemen you need not fear, when your term 
of office shall have ended but what our fellow T citizens will 
say that we tried faithfully to do our full duty to our 
beloved citv that is so near and dear to us all. 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER 



CONTAINING 



RULES AND ORDERS 



OF THE 



CITY COUNCIL 



AND A LIST OF THE 



I Hi OFFiGERS Of lit till Of LOWELL 



1905. 




LOWELL MASS. 

The Libby Printing Co., Printers. 

1905- 



JOINT RILES HI ORDERS Of IHE CITY GOUNGIL 



i. In the month of January, and not later than the sec- 
ond regular meeting after organization of each branch of the 
City Council, joint standing committees shall be appointed 
as follows : 

A Committee on Claims. 

A Committee on Education. 

A Committee on Fire Department. 

A Committee on Lands and Buildings. 

A Committee on Military Affairs. 

A Committee on Ordinances and Legislation. 

A Committee on Printing. 

A Committee on Streets. 

A Committee on Commons. 

A Committee on Industries. 



Each committee shall consist of two Aldermen and three 
members of the Common Council, except the Committee on 



4 MUNICIPAL REGISTER 

Streets, which shall consist of two Aldermen and five mem- 
bers of the Common Council. 



2. Each board shall, in such manner as it may deter- 
mine, select its own members for any joint committee. 

3. In all joint standing committees, except that on 
Finance, the , member first named in the Board of Aldermen 
shall be chairman ; on the Committee on Finance, the mem- 
ber first named in the Common Council shall be chairman ; 
and in all joint special committees, the member first named 
in the board where the business originates shall be chairman, 
and shall call the committee together. 

4. Reports of committees shall be -made to the board 
first meeting after such reports are prepared and signed. 

5. No committee shall act by separate consultation, and 
no report shall be received unless agreed to in committee 
actually assembled. 

6. It shall be the duty of every joint committee (the 
Committee on Streets excepted) to whom any subject may 
be specially referred, to report thereon within five weeks, or 
ask for further time. 



7. The by-laws of the city shall be termed ordinances; 
the enacting clause of which shall be — Be it ordained by the- 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER 5 

City Council of the City of Lowell, as follows : In all votes 
by which either or both branches of the City Council express 
anything by command, the form of expression shall be, 
Ordered, and whenever either or both branches express 
opinions, principles, facts or purposes, the form shall be, 
Resolved. 



8. An ordinance may originate in either board, and 
shall be considered in three several stages. It shall first be 
read for information, and the question shall then be on order- 
ing it to the Joint Standing Committee on Ordinances and 
Legislation, and then sent to the other branch for concur- 
rence. When reported back, the recommendations of the 
committee shall first be acted on. If it shall then be ordered 
to a second reading, it shall next be examined by a standing 
committee of that board, who shall see that it is drawn in 
proper form. When returned by such committee, the ques- 
tion shall be on ordering it to be enrolled. If so ordered, it 
shall then be sent to 'the other board, where the same order 
of proceedings shall be observed. When it has been ordered 
by both branches to be enrolled, it shall be enrolled by the 
Clerk of the Common Council, and shall be by him submit- 
ted to the proper committee of that board to ascertain if it 
has been correctly enrolled. If so reported, the question 
shall be on passing it to be ordained. If it shall so pass, it 
shall be signed by the President of the Common Council, and 
be sent to the Board of Aldermen, where it shall take a like 
course. If passed to be ordained in that board, it shall be 
signed by the Chairman of the Board of Aldermen and sent 
to the mayor for his approval. 



6 MUNICIPAL REGISTER 

9. An ordinance may be rejected in any stage, but may 
not pass through all its stages in the same day. Each board 
shall transmit to the other all papers on which any ordinance, 
joint resolution, or order shall be founded ; and all papers 
on their passage between the two boards, shall be under the 
signature of their respective clerks, except ordinances and 
joint resolutions in their last stage, which shall be signed by 
the presiding officers. If papers come before either board 
which have been duly acted upon in the other board, the 
presiding officer shall so state without reading the endorse- 
ments of the clerk, unless the latter are called for. 



10. All enrolled ordinances shall be written in a fair 
and legible hand, or typewritten, provided a permanent rec- 
ord ribbon is used, without interlineations or erasures, and 
no enrolled ordinance or resolution shall be amended. 



11. Every joint resolution shall be read in the board in 
which it is introduced, and the question shall be upon order- 
ing it to a second reading. If so ordered, the question shall 
then be upon its passage. If passed, it shall be sent to the 
other board, where the order of proceeding shall be the same. 
When passed by both boards, the resolution shall be present- 
ed to the Mayor for his approval, and when the same shall 
be in force, shall be enrolled by the clerk of the Common 
Council, and when found correctly enrolled as provided in 
the case of an ordinance, it shall be signed by the President 
of the Common Council and the Chairman of the Board of 
Aldermen, and be presented to the Mayor for his signature if 
he approved the original. 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER 7 

12. Joint orders shall require but one reading, and 
when adopted, shall be sent to the Mayor for his approval, 
except when they relate to a question of a convention of the 
two branches, or the election of any officer. 

13. When either board does not concur with the other 
in any ordinance or resolution sent from the other, notice of 
such non-concurrence shall be given by a written message. 

14. In any case of non-concurrence, each board may 
appoint a Committee of Conference. Such committee shall 
consist, in each case, of three members who support the vote 
of their own board. These two committees may meet jointly 
or separately, and a majority of each shall decide its action. 

15. All reports and other papers submitted to the City 
Council shall be written in a fair hand, or typewritten, pro- 
vided a permanent record ribbon is used, without endorse- 
ment, except in case of the introduction of an order or resolu- 
tion. In such a case the member introducing an order or 
resolution shall subscribe his name at the bottom of the back 
of the same. All other endorsements upon the back of 
papers shall be made by the clerk ; and the clerks of the 
boards respectively, shall, on seasonable notice, make copies 
of any papers to be reported by committees, at the request of 
the respective chairmen thereof. 

16. No business shall be transacted by the City Council 
in convention, except such as shall have been previously 
agreed on, unless by unanimous consent. 



8 MUNICIPAL REGISTER 

17. In balloting in joint convention, blanks shall be 
reported but not counted as votes. 

18. When both boards are in session at the same time, 
neither shall adjourn without giving notice to the other of its 
intention. 

19. All petitions, reports, or other papers of whatever 
description, relating to business requiring the concurrent ac- 
tion of both boards of the City Council, shall be submitted 
by committees to the clerk of each board at least twenty-four 
hours before the time of meeting of either board, and the 
clerk of each board shall prepare a brief synopsis of all mat- 
ters to be acted upon, and place the same on the desk of each 
member of the City Council prior to the hour of opening the 
meeting. No reports or orders not previously furnished as 
herein described, shall be considered in either branch unless 
two-thirds of the members present consent thereto. 

20. These rules may be suspended for a specific pur- 
pose, or amended, whenever twenty-four members of a joint 
convention of the two branches shall so direct, or whenever 
a joint order to that effect shall be passed by the votes of six 
members of the Board of Aldermen and eighteen members of 
the Common Council, 

21. No resolution for the extension and laying out of 
any street or public highway shall be passed to a second 
reading by either branch of the City Council until the city 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 9 

civil engineer shall certify to the council that said street or 
highway is fully completed, and graded to the grades named 
in the resolution, without expense to the city. 

22. A yea and nay vote of the members of the City 
Council shall be required to pass any order or vote involving 
the expenditure or the appropriation of the public moneys, 
or involving any debt or liability, and such vote shall be 
entered upon the records of each branch of the City Council. 

23. Less than a quorum of each branch of the City 
Council may adjourn to a fixed day earlier than the regular 
meeting, and shall have power to compel the attendance of 
all absent members in such manner as the City Council may 
by ordinance provide. 

24. In the absence of rules governing both boards of 
the City Council, Cushing's Manual shall decide the point. 



RILES M) ORDERS OF HE BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



r. At the appointed time the presiding officer shall take 
the chair, and on the appearance of a quorum, proceed to 
business. 

2. The order of business shall be as follows : 

First. — At all regular meetings the journal of the last 
regular meeting and all intervening meetings of the board 
shall be approved without reading, unless the reading be 
called for b}^ some member of the board. 

Second. — Petitions and similar papers. 

Third. — Appointments, elections, etc. 

Fourth. — New business, which, Junless otherwise ordered, 
will take its place at the foot of Orders of the Day. 

Fifth. — Orders of the Day, consisting of unfinished busi- 
ness of the last previous meeting, papers from the Common 



12 MUNICIPAL REGISTER 

Council and such matters as have been introduced as new 
business. By a vote of six members, any matter in the Or- 
ders of the Day may at any time be taken up for immediate 
consideration. 

3. The presiding officer shall decide all points of order, 
subject to appeal. He may read while sitting, but must rise 
to put a question. He shall allow debate on a question until 
the vote has been declared, but not on the verification of a 
vote ; and on demand of two members shall take every vote 
by yeas and nays. 

4. When a question is under debate, the presiding 
officer shall receive no motion but to adjourn, to take up a 
special assignment, to lay on the table, to postpone to a day 
certain, to commit, to amend, or to postpone indefinitely. 
These several motions shall have precedence in the foregoing 
order, and debate upon any of them shall be confined to the 
actual motion, and shall not go into the merits of the main 
question, except on amendment. 

5. When a vote has passed, except for adjournment or 
to lay on the table, any member voting with the majority 
may move a reconsideration, to be acted upon at the same 
meeting. Any member voting with the minority may move 
a reconsideration, to be acted upon at the next meeting, 
which latter motion shall have priority, if made before the 
motion first mentioned shall have been decided. Provided, 
however, that no motion of reconsideration made b} r a mem- 
ber voting with the minority shall be received on any subsid- 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER 13. 

iary or incidental question. No motion shall be twice recon- 
sidered. 

6. No member shall be interrupted while speaking, but 
by a call to order, or for the correction of a mistake ; nor 
shall there be any conversation among the members while a 
paper is being read, or a question stated from the chair. 

7. When any member is about to speak in debate, he 
shall rise in his place and respectfully address the presiding 
officer, shall confine himself to the question under debate,, 
and avoid personality. 

8. In the month of January the following committees- 
shall be appointed : 

A Committee on Bills in Second Reading. 

A Committee on Electric Wires. 

A Committee on Enrollment. 

A Committee on Licenses. 

A Committee on Lighting Streets. 

A Committee on Sewers. 

A Committee on Weights and Measures. 

A Committee on State Aid. 

The committees on Licenses, on Sewers, and on Electric 



14 MUNICIPAL REGISTER 

Wires shall consist of three members each ; the other com- 
mittees shall be composed of two each. 

9. Every member present shall be held obliged to vote 
on all questions, and not to leave without permission, if his 
presence is necessary to make a quorum. 

10. The clerk shall prepare, for the use of the board a 
copy of the Orders of the Day, to which shall be added a list 
of matters laid on the table or postponed to a day certain. 

11. When a reference is proposed to moie than one com- 
mittee the question shall first be upon a standing committee 
of the board, then a special committee, then a joint standing 
committee, and last a joint special committee. 

12. These rules may be amended or suspended when- 
ever two-thirds of the members present may so vote ; but a 
motion to amend shall not be made and finally acted upon at 
the same meeting. 

13. All nominations shall lie on the table three days at 
least before action thereon by the board. 

14. All papers, of whatever description, which may 
require action by the board, shall be presented to the City 
Clerk not later than the hour of noon on the day of each reg- 
ular meeting. Petitions, reports and other papers, presented 
after that hour on such day, .will not be considered until the 
next meeting. 



RULES HID ORDERS OF HE COMMON GOUNGIL 



i. Upon the arrival of the hour fixed upon for the 
meeting, the President shall call for order, and within ten 
minutes (or sooner, if a quorum be present,) cause the clerk 
to call the roll and report to him the number present, and the 
number absent, which information he shall, in turn, announce 
to the body. In the absence of the President, the eldest sen- 
ior member shall call to order and preside until a President 
pro tempore is chosen. 

2. The President shall preserve order and decorum. 
He may speak to points of order in preference to other mem- 
bers, rising for that purpose. He shall decide questions of 
order, subject to appeal, but shall entertain no discussion on 
the merits of his ruling. 

3. While addressing the body the President shall stand, 
but he may read or put questions while sitting. 

4. The President shall declare all votes, and, if a vote 
be doubted, he shall, without permitting further debate, 
require the members voting in the affirmative to rise and 



l6 MUNICIPAL REGISTER 

« 

• 

remain standing until they are counted by the clerk; then he 

shall require the members voting in the negative to rise and 

remain standing until they are counted by the clerk, and he 

shall thereupon, on information from said clerk, declare the 

result. 

5. The President may call any member to the chair, but 
such substitution shall not extend beyond an adjournment, 
and when out of the chair he may express his opinion on any 
subject under debate, but he must not resume the chair while 
the same question is pending. 

6. All questions shall be propounded by the President 
in the order in which they are moved, unless the subsequent 
motion be previous in its nature. 

7. After a motion is stated by the President, it shall be 
disposed of by a vote of the body, unless the mover (no 
objection being offered) withdraws it before a decision or 
amendment. 

8. A motion to adjourn shall always be in order, unless 
the body is engaged in voting. 

9. The previous question shall be in this form : " Shall 
the main question be now put?" It shall only be admitted 
when demanded by a majority of members present, and until 
it is decided, shall preclude all amendment and debate of the 
main question. 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER 1 7 

10. The yeas and nays shall be taken on any question 
upon demand of one-third of the members present. 

n. When two or more members rise at the same time, 
the President shall name the member who shall speak first. 

12. Every motion shall be reduced to writing, if the 
President or any member requires it. 

t 

13. When a question is under debate, no motion shall 

be received but to adjourn, to lay on the table, for the previ- 
ous question, to postpone to a certain day, to commit, to 
amend, or to postpone indefinitely ; which several motions 
shall have precedence in the order in which they are arranged ; 
and no motion to postpone or commit shall be allowed twice 
in the same day, in the same stage of the ordinance or 
proposition, nor shall a vote on any subsidiary or incidental 
motion be reconsidered, except a motion to that effect be 
made and be acted upon at the same meeting at which the 
vote was decided. 

14. When any member is about to speak in debate, or 
deliver any matter to the body, he shall rise and respectfully 
address the presiding officer, confine himself to the question* 
and avoid personality. 

15. During debate no member shall be mentioned by 
name, but he may be described by such other designation as 
may be intelligible and respectful. 



10 MUNICIPAL REGISTER 

16. No member, while speaking, shall be interrupted 
by another, but by a call to order or to correct a mistake. If 
any member, in speaking or otherwise, transgresses the rules 
of the body, the President shall, or any member may, call 
him to order ; in which case the member so called to order 
shall immediately be seated until the question of order is 
decided. If the decision be in favor of the member called to 
order, he shall be at liberty to proceed ; if otherwise, he shall 
not proceed without leave of the body. 

17. No member shall speak more than twice to the same 
question without obtaining leave of the body. 

18. Whilst the President is speaking, no member shall 
pass between him and the body, and while a member' is 
speaking no member shall pass between him and the Presi- 
dent ; nor shall any person rise in front of a speaking 
member except to raise a point of order. 



19. When a question has been decided, any member vot- 
ing with the majority may move a reconsideration to be acted 
upon at the same meeting. Any member voting with the 
minority may move a reconsideration to be acted upon at 
the next meeting ; which later motion shall have priority, if 
made before the motion first mentioned shall have been 
decided. No vote or question shall be twice reconsidered. 

20. Every member present when a question is put shall 
unless for specific reasons, excused by a majority of the 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER 19 

members, give his vote. But in the election of any city 
officer, he may decline to vote, as provided in Section 7, 
Chapter 26, of the Revised Laws. And no member shall 
leave without permission, if his presence is necessary to 
make a quorum. • 

21. No motion or proposition, on a subject different 
from that under consideration, shall be admitted under color 
of an amendment. 

22. All reports may be committed or recommitted at the 
pleasure of the body. 

23. The division of a question may be called for when 
the sense will admit of it. 

24. A majority vote shall be necessary to sustain objec- 
tion to the reading of a paper. 

25. No standing order shall be suspended, except by a 
two-thirds vote of the members present ; nor shall any rule 
or order governing the body be repealed or amended without 
one day's notice, nor unless fourteen members concur therein. 

26. The order of business shall be as follows : 
1— Roll call. 

2 — Reading of records. 






20 MUNICIPAL REGISTER 

3 — Papers from the Board of Aldermen. 

4— Communications and reports from city officials. 

5 — Presentation of petitions, remonstrances and memo- 
rials. 

6 — Reports of committees. 

7 — Unfinished business of preceding meetings. 

8 — Motions, orders or resolutions. 

The above order of business shall not be departed from,, 
except by a vote of a majority of the members present, but 
the body may appoint a committee of two to approve the 
records of the clerk during the year, and if such a committee 
is appointed, the reading of the records shall be omitted,, 
unless called for by one-third of the members present. 

27. The seats of the Common Council shall be numbered 
and determined by lot, and no member shall change his seat 
but by permission of the President. 

28. All committees, except such as the body determines 
to select by ballot, or such as may be required by statute to 
be voted for, shall be appointed by the President, and the 
political minority shall be represented by at least one 
member. 

29. No member shall be obliged to serve on more than 
two committees at the same time, or be chairman of more, 
than one. 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER 21 

30. All memorials and other papers addressed to the 
"body shall be presented by the President, or by a member in 
his place, who shall explain the subject thereof ; and they 
shall be taken up in the order in which they were presented, 
unless the body shall otherwise direct. 

3r. Standing Committees shall be appointed on the 
following subjects : 

On Second Reading of Bills and Ordinances. 

On Enrollment. 

On Elections and Returns. 

32. No committee shall sit during a session of the body, 
without special leave, exeept the Committee on the Second 
Reading of Bills and Ordinances and the Committee on 
Enrollment. 

33. These rules shall be observed in the Committee of 
the Whole, so far as they are applicable, except Rule 17. 

34. When a committee is nominated by the chair, the 
first person named shall be chairman. In the election of 
committees, except on finance, when a chairman is not spec- 
ially chosen, the person having the highest number of votes 
shall act as chairman ; and in case of an equality in votes 



22 MUNICIPAL REGISTER 

between two or more members of a committee, the members 
thereof shall choose a chairman. 

35. All committees shall consist of three members, unless 
otherwise specially provided for ; and no report shall be 
received from any committee unless agreed to in committee 
actually assembled ; and reports shall be in writing, unless 
otherwise ordered. 

36. It shall be the duty of every committee to whom 
any subject may be specially referred, to report thereon within 
five weeks, unless further time be previously asked for and 
granted. 

37. Members of the body may attend any meeting of 
any of its committees, but shall not vote thereat. 

38. All ordinances and resolutions shall have two 
several readings before they shall be finally passed. See 
Joint Rules 7 and 8. 

39. All ordinances after being read a second time shall 
be referred to the Committee on the Second Reading of Bills 
and Ordinances, and after being reported upon by said com- 
mittee, shall be again read, after which the question shall be 
on passing the same to be enrolled. 

40. No ordinance or resolution imposing penalties, or 
authorizing the expenditure of money, shall have more than 
one reading the same day. 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER 23 

41. Any member offering a resolution or order shall 
write his name on the bottom of the back of such paper. 

42. All city officers shall be voted for in accordance with 
Section 7, Chapter 26, of the Revised Laws. 

43. The clerk shall keep brief minutes of the votes and 
proceedings of the body, entering thereon all accepted resolu- 
tions ; shall notice reports and memorials, and other papers 
submitted to the board, only by their titles or by a brief 
description of their purport. 

44. The clerk shall keep the record of committees that 
may require that service ; and on the appointment of every 
standing committee, a book for records shall be provided by 
its chairman, or by said clerk. The clerk shall have the 
custody of all minutes by him kept ; and the records of the 
several committees shall be open to the inspection of members 
of the City Council. 

45. . With the exception of an order for a joint conven- 
tion, any joint order or resolution originating in the Common 
Council shall be copied, and shall, previous to the hour for 
calling the meeting to order, be posted by the clerk, in some 
prominent place in the Common Council Chamber or coat 
room, where it may be open to the inspectionof members. 

46. All orders, resolutions, reports, petitions or other 
papers, (except communications )irequiring concurrent action, 



24 MUNICIPAL REGISTER 

or action by this body only, shall be filed by members in the 
office of the City Clerk at least twenty-four hours before the 
time set for the meeting of the body ; also all reports or 
papers from committees. 

47. No paper entered in violation of the preceding rule 
shall be considered except by unanimous consent. 

48. The clerk shall, previous to each regular or special 
meeting, prepare, in the sequence of the order of business, a 
brief synopsis of all matters to be acted upon, and place, or 
cause to be placed, on the desk of each member, a copy of 
the same, prior to the hour designated for calling such 
meeting to order. 

'49. " Cushing's Manual" shall be authority on all 
questions of debate or parliamentary usage, when the same 
does not conflict with the rules and orders of this body. 

50. A copy of " Cushing's Manual " shall, at all times, 
during the sessions of this body, be on the desk of the 
President. 

SPECIAL RULE. 

All joint orders requiring concurrent action, calling for 
the contraction of loans, except loans in anticipation of taxes, 
shall first be read for information and shall then lie upon the 
table until the next meeting, when action upon the passage 
of the same may be taken. This rule shall not be suspended 
or repealed unless by a two-thirds vote of the members 
present. 



MAYOR 



JAMES B. CASEY 87 Summer Street 



ALDERMEN 

OTIS ALLEN 947 Middlesex Street 

THOMAS H. BRADEN 118 Branch Street 

JAMES H. CARMICHAEL 22 Rolfe Street 

DANIEL COSGROVE 492 Gorham Street 

WILLIAM FAIRWEATHER 756 School Street 

ALBERT F. GRANT 244 Gibson Street 

WILLIAM J. HAYES 61 Coranell Avenue 

FRED H. ROURKE 777 Central Street 

JAMES F. WALKER 43 Seventh Street 

ALBERT F. GRANT Chairman 

GIRARD P. DADMAN Clerk 



26 MUNICIPAL REGISTER 

COMMON COUNCILMEN 

Ward One 

JAMES H. FLEMING 9 2 John Street 

JAMES J. HAYES (died Sept. 4.) 85 French Street 

CHARLES F. MORSE 19 Second Street 

Ward Two 

FREDERICK CRONAN 9 Franklin Court 

JEREMIAH A. DALY 211 Fletcher Street 

FRANK McMAHON 23 Adams Street 

Ward Three 

EDMUND J. CHENEY 19 Grove Street 

HARRY H. J. READ 347 Westford Street 

WESLEY M. WILDER 6 Coral Street 

Ward Four 

HENRY F. CARR 1 rear 592 Gorham Street 

DENNIS J. DONOHUE 13 Newhall Street 

JOHN P. MAHONEY 12 New Street 

Ward Five 

JOHN DONOHUE 3 rear 104 Lawrence Street 

ANDREW McALOON. .' '. ! 8 Everett Street 

EDWARD F. SHEA 178 Perry Street 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER 27 

I 
Ward Six 

FREDERICK G. BALDWIN 374 Beacon Street 

JOHN H. BLAKE 129 Fulton Street 

NORMAN W. WHITE \ .471 Bridge Street 

Ward Seven 

t 

* J. OMER ALLARD 994 Moody Street 

LEON MARCOTTE 145 Cross Street 

WILLIAM G. McINTYRE 19 Lombard Street 

Ward Eight 

WILLIAM H. DODGE 28 South Walker Street 

CHARLES N. LEACH 1358 Middlesex Street 

SOLOMON S. MAYBERRY 54 Jenness Street 

Ward Nine 

CHARLES H. CLOUGH 546 Rogers Street 

BURTON H. CROSBY in Moore Street 

JOHN W. DALY 76 Andrews Street 

WILLIAM H. DODGE President 

FRANK M. DOWLING Clerk 



28 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER 



MEETINGS OF THE CITY COUNCIL 

The regular meetings of both branches of the City Coun- 
cil are Held at the City Hall as follows : 

ALDERMEN 



Second and fourth Tuesdays in each Month except August. 



January 10 and 24 

February 14 and 28 

March 14 and 28 

April 11 and 25 

May 9 and 23 

June 13 and 27 

At 8 P. M 



July 11 and 25 

September 12 and 26 

October 10 and 24 

November 14 and 28 

December 12 and 26 



COUNCILMEN 



First and third Tuesdays in each mouth except August. 



January 3 and 17 

February 7 and 21 

March 7 and 2 1 

April 4 and 18 

May 2 and 16 

June 6 and 20 

At 8 P. M 



July 4 and 18 

September 5 and 19 

October 3 and 17 

November...' 7 and 21 

December 5 and 19 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER 29 

Joint Standing Committees of the City Council 

APPROPRIATIONS— Aldermen Braden, Grant and Cosgrove ; Council- 
men Dodge, Read, Morse and McAloon. 

ACCOUNTS — Alderman Braden ; Councilmen Baldwin and Mclntyre. 

CLAIMS — Aldermen Walker and Hayes ; Councilmen Leach, Marcotte 
and J. W. Daly. 

EDUCATION— Aldermen Walker and Allen ; Councilmen Wilder, Bald- 
win and J. A. Daly. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT— Aldermen Fairweather and Hayes; Council- 
men Allard, White and Shea. 

FINANCE — Councilman Cheney (Chairman) ; Mayor James B. Casey, 
Alderman Carmichael ; Councilmen Mahoney and Crosby. 

INDUSTRIES — Aldermen Carmichael and Rourke ; Councilmen Crosby, 
Allard and McMahon. 

LANDS AND BUILDINGS— Aldermen Allen and Braden; Councilmen 
Mclntyre, Blake and Cronan. 

MILITARY AFFAIRS— Aldermen Fairweather and Carmichael ; Coun- 
cilmen Crosby, Blake and D. J. Donohue. 

ORDINANCES AND LEGISLATION— Aldermen Braden and Rourke ; 
Councilmen Wilder, Clough and Carr. 

PRINTING — Aldermen Hayes and Rourke ; Councilmen L^ach, Mar- 
cotte and John Donohue. 

STREETS — Aldermen Fairweather and Hayes; Conncilmen Morse,. 
Mayberry, Fleming, Clough and Mahoney. 



3° MUNICIPAL REGISTER 

Joint Special Committees 

FOURTH OF JULY— Aldermen Fairweather, Walker and Rourke ; 
Councilmen Crosby, Baldwin, Mclntyre, Mahoney and McMahon 
and Mayor Casey. 

SANATARIES— Councilmen Hayes, Clongh and John Donohue ; Alder- 
men $.llen and Rourke. 

MUNICIPAL LIGHTING AND HEATING— Councilmen Hayes and 
Morse ; Alderman Walker. 

HUNTINGTON HALL AND RAILROAD STATION— Aldermen Bra- 
een, Fairweather and Grant ; Councilmen Crosby, Shea and Dodge 
and Mayor Casey. 



Standing Committees of the Board of Aldermen 

SEWERS— Aldermen Grant, Walker and Cosgrove. 

STATE AID— Aldermen Braden and Carmichael. - 

LIGHTING STREETS— Aldermen Fairweather and Carmichael. 

ELECTRIC WIRES— Aldermen f^rant, Allen and Rourke. 

LICENSES— Aldermen Walker and Cosgrove. 

WEIGHTS AND MEASURES— Aldermen Fairweather and Rourke. 

BILLS IN SECOND READING— Aldermen RoUrke and Carmichael. 

ENROLLMENT— Aldermen Carmichael and Cosgrove. 



Special Committee of the Board of Aldermen 

POLLING PLACES— Aldermen Allen, Fairweather and Carmichael. 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER 3 1 

Standing Committees of the Common Council 

BILLS IN SECOND READING— Councilmeu White, Fleming and J. 
A. Daly. 

ELECTIONS AND^RETURNS— Councilmen Hayes, Mclntyre and Shea. 
ENROLLMENT— Councilmen Baldwin, Read and D. J. Donohue. 



Special Committees of the Common Council 

CLERK'S RECORD— Councilmen Cheney and John Donohue. 
RULES — Councilmen Mayberry, Hayes and McMahon. 



GUY OFFIGERS FOR 1905. 



MAYOR 

Telephone, 395. 

JAMES B. CASEY Office, City Hall 



CITY CLERK 

Telephone, 430. 



GIRARD P. DADMAN Office, City Hall 

Chosen by the City Council in convention in January. Term expires 
first Monday in January, or when successor is chosen. City Charter, Sect. 
17, Ord., Chap. 8 



ASSISTANT CITY CLERK 

WILLIAM P. MCCARTHY Office, City Hall 

Appointed by the City Clerk, subject to approval of the Board of 
Aldermen. 



CLERK OF COMMITTEES 

Telephone, 130. 

FRANK M. DOWLING, Term expires 1907 Office, City Hall 

Chosen by concurrent vote in January for the term of three years. 



34 MUNICIPAL REGISTER 

CITY TREASURER AND COLLECTOR OF TAXES 

Telephone, 577. 

ANDREW CI. STILES Office, City Hall 

Chosen by the City Council in convention in January for one year 
from first day of April, or until successor is chosen. City Charter, Sect. 
17, Ord. Chap. 9. 



AUDITOR OF ACCOUNTS 

Telephone 74. 

DAVID CHASE (died May 7) 

CHARLES D. PAGE (elected June 27) Office, City Hall 

Chosen by concurrent vote in January or February for one year from 
the first day of April, or until successor is chosen. Ord., Chap. 2, Sect. 1. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS 

Telephone, 572-3. 

CHARLES J. MORSE Office, City Hall 

Chosen by concurrent vote in January or February. Term expires 
first Monday in Jan., or when successor is chosen. Ord., Chap. 39, Sec.i. 



CHIEF OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SUPPLIES 

Telephone, 230. 

JAMES E. DONNELLY Office, City Hall 

Chosen at annual city election. Sect. 3, Chap. 415. Acts of 1896. 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER 35 

CIVIL ENGINEER FOR THE CITY 

Telephone, 136-2 

GEORGE BOWERS . Office, City Hall 

Chosen by concurrent vote in Jan. or Feb. for one year from the first 
day of April, or until his successor is chosen. Ord., Chap. 13, Sect. 1. 



CITY SOLICITOR 

Telephone, 566-5. 

JAMES GILBERT HILL Office, City Hall 

Chosen by concurrent vote in Jan. or Feb. for one year from the first 
day of March, or until his successor is chosen. Ord., Chap. 11, Sect. 1. 



CITY MESSENGER 

Telephone, 130. 

JOSEPH E. PATTEE Office, City Hall 

Chosen by concurrent vote in Jan. for one year from first Monday in 
Feb. or until successor is chosen. Ord., Chap. 10, Sect. 1. 



LIBRARIAN OF CITY LIBRARY 

Telephone 506-3. 

FREDERICK A. CHASE Office, at City Library 

Chosen by the Board of Trustees of the City Library. Chap. 231, 
Sect. 5, Acts of ii 



36 MUNICIPAL REGISTER 

BOARD OF PARK COMMISSIONERS 

THALLES P. HALL Term expires 1905. 

COL. PERCY PARKER t Term expires 1906 

HON. JOHN E. DRURY, (Secretary) Term expires 1907 

HON. JOHN J. PICKMAN, (Chairman) Term expires 1908 

HARVEY B. GREENE Term expires 1909 

One member appointed annually by the Mayor with the approval of 
the City Council, for a term of five years from the first Monday in May. 
Revised Laws, Chap. 28. 

CHARLES A. WHITTET, Superintendent. 



TRUSTEES OF CITY LIBRARY 

JAMES- B. CASEY, Chairman, Ex-Officio Mayor 

DENNIS A. SULLIVAN Term expires 1906 

MRS. ROWENA PALMER Term expires 1907 

FRANK P. PUTNAM Term expires 1908 

GEORGE F. RICHARDSON, Vice-Chairman fTerm expires 1909 

THOMAS WALSH Term expires 1910 

FREDERICK A. CHASE, Clerk 

One appointed by the Mayor in December for term of five years com- 
mencing the second Monday in January, or until successor is appointed. 
Regular meeting last Tuesday in each month. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF BUBLIC BUILDINGS 

Telephone, 129-2 

JOHN J. O'CONNOR Office, City Hall 

Chosen by concurrent vote in January or February. Term expires 
first Monday in Jan., or when successor is chosen. Ord., Chap. 5, Sect. 1.. 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER 37 

CITY PHYSICIAN 

Telephone, 551-4 

PORSTER H. SMITH Office, City Hall 

Chosen by concurrent vote in March or April. Term expires April 
30, or when successor is chosen. Ord., approved June 27, 1900. 



TRUSTEES OF PUBLIC BURIAL GROUNDS 

JAMES B. CASEY, Chairman, Ex-Officio Mayor 

JOHN L. STEVENS Term expires Jan. 1, 1906 

RICHARD A. GRIFFITHS Term expires Jan. 1, 1907 

RICHARD A. GRIFFITHS Secretary 

JOHN G. JACKSON Superintendent 

Telephone, 58-4 

One appointed by Mayor and Aldermen annually in December, for 
two years from the first day of January next ensuing, or until successor is 
Appointed. Acts of 1891, Chap. 337. 



ASSESSORS OF TAXES 

Telephone, 136-3 

C. ARTHUR ABBOTT Term expires 1906 

JOHN P. MAHONEY Term expires 1907 

ABEL WHEELER Term expires 1908 

ABEL WHEELER Chairman 

JOHN P. MAHONEY Secretary 

WILLIAM J. REARDON Clerk 



38 MUNICIPAL REGISTER 

ASSISTANT ASSESSORS OF TAXES 

RICHARD CHARLTON CHARLES RILEY 

EDWARD T. GOWARD JOHN F. MEEHAN 

THOMAS F. GARVEY MICHAEL BOURDON 

Assessors : — One chosen by concurrent vote annually in January or 
February, for the term of three years from the first Monday in January, 
or until successor is chosen. Ord., Chap. 3, Sect. 1. 

Assistant Assessors : — Appointed by the Mayor in March or April, for 
May and June, Subject to confirmation by the City Council. Ord. appro- 
ved February 28, 1899. 



INSPECTOR OF WIRES 

JAMES F. McELHOLM Term expires Feb. 1, 1907 

Appointed by Mayor and Aldermen in January for term of three 
years. Ord. approved July 15, 1898. 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR 

Telephone, 566-3 

Chosen at the City Election for two years. 

JOHN F. McCOY Chairman 

WARD 

i— EDWARD H. FOYE, 201 Market Street Term expires 1905 

2 — WM. J. DUNN, 290 Adams Street Term expires 1905 

3— JOHN F. McCOY, 112 Middle Street Term expires 1905 

4 — JOHN J. DUFF, 15 Auburn Street, Term expires 1905 

5— JOHN McMANUS, 13 Merrimack Sq Term expires 1906 

6— EDWIN S. EASTMAN, 96 West Street Term expires 1906 

7— VITAL ROBERT, 33 Fifth Avenue Term expires 1905 

8— WM. H. SHIELDS, 627 Chelmsford Street Term expires 1906 

9— CHARLES H. SHEPARD, 60 Andrews Street Term expires 1906 

Regular meeting last Thursday of the month at City Hospital. 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER 39 

Secretary, and Superintendent of Out=Door Poor 

MARTIN J. COURTNEY, 26 Ames Street Office, City Hall 

Hours: 9 A. M. to 4 P. M. 

Superintendent of In=Door Poor 

CHARLES E. DONLAN, M. D., Office and Residence, City Hospital 

List of Committees 

ACCOUNTS— Messrs. Dunn, Shepard and McManus. 

AGRICULTURE, CATTLE AND SWINE— Messrs. McCoy, Duff and 

Shepard. 
CARE AND REPAIR OF BUILDINGS— Messrs. Robert, Foye and Dunn 
CLOTHING, FURNITURE AND BEDDING— Messrs. Duff, Robert and 

Foye. 
DISPENSARY— Messrs. McCoy, Shepard and Dunn. 
PRINTING— Messrs. Eastman, Duff and McManus. 
OUT-DOOR RELIEF— Messrs. McManus, Shields and Eastman. 
PROVISIONS AND SUPPLIES— Messrs. Foye, Shepard and Duff. 
WOOD-YARD— Messrs. Shepard, Robert and Foye. 
INSURANCE— Messrs. Shields, McManus and Eastman. 



District and Dispensary Physicians 

DISTRICT 1— CLARENCE LIVINGSTON 9 Runels Building 

DISTRICT 2— A. E. BERTRAND 1 Runels Building 

DISTRICT 3— E. M. MURPHY 7 and 8 Shedd Building 

DISTRICT 4—O. P. PORTER 253 Central Street 

DISTRICT 5— CHAS. M. FRYE 403 Middlesex Street 

DISTRICT 6— PIERRE BRUNELLE, JR 33 East Merrimack Street 



40 MUNICIPAL REGISTER 

City Dispensary 

Office, City Hall 

EDWIN F. MASON Clerk 

Open week days 9 A. M. to 1 P. M., 2.30 to 5 P. M. 



MEMBERS OF THE LOWELL WATER BOARD 

OFFICE, CITY HALL. 
Telephone, 271-2. 

ROBERT J. CROWLEY President 

AUGUST FELS, died July 2 

Z. WINCHELL STURTEVANT, elected July 25 Term expires 1906 

ROBERT J. CROWLEY Term expires 1907 

FRANK L. WEAVER Term expires 1908 

ISAAC E. WOTTON Term expires 1909 

JOHN W. CRAWFORD Clerk 

ROBERT J. THOMAS Superintendent 

The members of the Lowell Water Board are chosen by concurrent 
vote in January or February for a term of four years from second Monday 
in March following their election, one member retiring annually. 
The Superintendent is chosen in March by the Board. 
The Clerk is chosen by the Board in June. Ord. Chap. 45. 
HOURS : 9 A. M. to 5 P. M. 



COMMISSIONERS OF SINKING FUNDS 

FRED A. BUTTRICK Term expires 1906 

CHARLES L. KNAPP Term expires 1907 

AUSTIN K. CHADWICK Term expires 1908 

ANDREW G. STILES Secretary and Treasurer 

One member elected annually by the City Council in December for 
three years, commencing January first. Revised Laws, Chap. 27, Sect. 14. 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER 41 

BOARD OF CIVIL SERVICE EXAMINERS 

JOSEPH SMITH rf Chairman 

JOHN J. COLTON, M. D., CHARLES H. CONANT, JOSEPH SMITH 

CHARLES H. CONANT Secretary 

Appointed by State Civil Service Commissioners. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF STATE AID AND AGENT FOR 

THE BURIAL OF INDIGENT SOLDIERS 

AND SAILORS, ETC. 

Telephone, 136-4 

HUBERT M. POTTER 

MARY C. BRENNAN, Asst. Supt. 

Appointed by Mayor and Aldermen prior to first day of February, 
jor one year. Ord. approved Sept. 27, 1898. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

The Chief Engineer is elected by concurrent vote in the month of 
March or April, for the term of three years. Sec. 2, Chap. 95, Acts of 1897. 

Assistant Engineers appointed by the Mayor and Aldermen in March 
or April, the First Assistant for three years, the others for one year, com- 
encing the first day of May. Ord. approved Nov 27, 1896. 

Chief Engineer 

Telephone, 201-12 

EDWARD S. HOSMER, 202 Westford St Term expires 1906 

Office, Engine House, Middle Street. 



42 MUNICIPAL REGISTER 

Assistant Engineers 

JAMES F. NORTON First Asst , 22 Ames St Term expires 1907- 

GEORGE F. SALMON, 91 Mt. Washington St Term- expires 1906 

EDWARD MELOY, 30 Fort Hill Ave Term expires 1906 

CHARLES STACKPOLE, 105 Liberty Street Term expires 1906 

JAMES F. NORTON Clerk of the Board 

The Clerk is chosen by the Engineers. 

Operator of Fire Alarm Telegraph 

HENRY C. FERNALD Central Station 

Committee on Fire Department 

Aldermen FAIRWEATHER and HAYES; Councilmen ALXARD, 
WHITE and SHEA. 



BOARD OF POLICE OF THE CITY OF LOWELL 

Office, Police Station. 

FRANK B. DOW Chairman 

FRANK B. DOW Term expires 1906 

FISHER H. PEARSON Term expires 1908 

LAFOREST BEALS Term expires 1910 

Appointed by the Mayor under the provisions of Chap. 428 of the 
Acts of 1894 and Chap. 187 of the Acts of 1895. 

JOSEPH SMITH Clerk 

Regular meetings at the Police Station every Tuesday evening at 8 

o'clock. 

Telephone, 101 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER 43 



WILLIAM B. MOFFATT, Superintendent of Police 

REDMOND WELCH, Deputy Superintendent 

WILLIAM R. KEW, Captain 

JAMES BROSNAN, Lieutenant 

HUGH DOWNEY, Lieutenant 

JAMES E. WEBSTER, Lieutenant 

MARTIN CONNORS. Sergeant 

JOHN B. CROWLEY, Sergeant 

JOHN FREEMAN, Sergeant 

DAVID J. DONALDSON, Inspector, Criminal 

CHARLES LAFLAMME, Inspector, Criminal 

JOHN A. WALSH, Inspector, Criminal 

MARTIN MAHER, Inspector, Criminal 

MICHAEL E. MCDONALD, Inspector of Claims 



Keeper of Lockup 

WILLIAM B. MOFFATT 



Constables 

ADAMS, THOMAS E LAPORTE, ELIE C 

BATES, FREDERICK A MAGUIRE, JOHN E 

BRADLEY, CHARLES F MANSUR, EZRA E 

BREAULT, JEAN L McMANUS, JOHN 

EMERY, DANIEL McCLUSKEY, WM. J 

GATELY, BERNARD F PINDER, JOHN J 

GERRISH, ENOCH SAVITHES, JORDAN S 

HARTWELL, CHARLES C SLATTERY, EDWARD F 

LAPIERRE, JOSEPH S SMITH, WALTER S 

TURCOTTE, ISIDORE 



44 MUNICIPAL REGISTER 

POLICE COURT ' 

Telephone, 575 

SAMUEL P. HADLEY Standing Justice 

JOHN J. PICKMAN Special Justice 

FREDERICK A. FISHER Special Justice 

JAMES F. SAVAGE Clerk 

EDWARD W. TRULL. Assistant Clerk 

EDWARD F. SLATTERY Probation Officer 



HEALTH COMMISSIONER 

Telephone, 101 

WILLIAM B. MOFFATT Office, Police Station 

Chosen by concurrent vote by nomination commencing in the Board 
of Aldermen, in January or February. Ord., Chap. 41, Sect. 1. 



BOARD OF HEALTH 

Telephone, 549-2 

WM. B. JACKSON, M. D., Term expires first Mon. in Feb. 1905 

WM. C. DOHERTY, Secretary Term expires first Mon. in Feb. 1906 

LEONARD HUNTRESS, M. D.(Chn)Term expires first Mon. in Feb. 1907 

One member appointed annually by the Mayor and Board of Alder- 
men in January for term of three years from first Monday in February. 
Chap. 332, Sect. 1, Acts of 1895. 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER 45. 

BOARD OF REGISTRARAS OF VOTERS 

JOHN P. FARLEY, Chairman 

JOHN P. FARLEY Term expires May 1, 1906 

CORNELIUS F. SULLIVAN Term experes May 1, 1907 

ALBERT J. BLAZON ' Term expires May 1, 1908 

GIRARD P. DADMAN, City Clerk, Ex-Officio. 
Revised Laws, Chap. 11, Sect. 25. 

One member appointed annually in March or April for three years 
from the first day of May next ensuing and until his successor is appoint- 
ed and qualified. 



FENCE VIEWERS 

WILLIAM A. ARNOLD JOHN VINCENT 

Chosen by concurrent vote by nomination commencing in the Board 
of Aldermen in January or February. Ord., Chap. 41, Sec. 1. 



FIELD DRIVERS 

FRANK FOX WILLIAM G. BUMPS 

JAMES E. WEBSTER 

Chosen by concurrent vote by nomination commencing in the Board 
of Aldermen in January or February. Ord., Chap. 41, Sect. 1. 



POUND KEEPER 



Chosen by concurrent vote by nomination commencing in the Board 
of Aldermen in January or February. Ord., Chap. 41, Sect. 1. 



46 MUNICIPAL REGISTER 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 

JAMES R. FULTON 

Appointed by the Board of Aldermen by nomination in March or 
April. Revised Laws, Chap. 62, Sect. 18, Ord. Chap. 41, Sect. 2. 



INSPECTOR OF MILK, VINEGAR and OLEOMARGARINE 

THOMAS O. ALLEN Office, City Hall 

Appointed by the Board of Aldermen by nomination in January or 
February. Ord., Chap. 41, Sect 2. 



INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 

WALTER A. SHERMAN Office, 340 Central Street 

Appointed by the Mayor and Board of Aldermen annually in March, 
subject to approval of Chief of Cattle Bureau. Revised Laws Chap. 90, 
Sect. 12, Acts of 1902, Chap. 116. 



INSPECTOR OF PROVISIONS 

JOHN M. FARRELL 
Appointed by the Mayor and Board of Aldermen 



INSPECTORS OF PETROLEUM OIL 

THOMAS O. ALLEN EDWARD S. HOSMER 

Appointed by the Mayor and Aldermen. Revised Laws, Chap. 102, 
Sect. 109, 1 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER 47 

INSPECTOR OF BOILERS 

BARTHOLOMEW SCANNELL 
Revised Laws Chap. 105, Sect. 7. 



FISH WARDEN 

GEORGE T. SPENCE 
Appointed by the Mayor and Aldermen. Revised Laws, Chap. 91, Sect. 54 



SUPERINTENDENT OF CITY SCALES-MEASURER OF WOOD 

AND BARK-INSPECTOR OF BALED OR BUNDLED 

HAY-AT CITY SCALES 

GEORGE F. NOONAN 
Office at City Scales, Rear of Police Station. 

Appointed by the Board of Aldermen in January or February. Ord. 
Chap. 46, Sect. 1 ; Chap. 21, Sect. 1. 



MEASURERS OF WOOD AND BARK BROUGHT BY WATER OR 
RAILROAD CARS INTO THE CITY 

JOHN F. BATEMAN 

Appointed by the Board of Aldermen in January or February. Ord. 
Chap. 46, Sect. 1. 



4 8 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER 



MEASURERS OF WOOD AND BARK 

COBURN, CLARENCE G LINSCOTT, HIRAM E 

FENTON, ABRAM McPHETRES, SAMUEL A 

FULLER, GEORGE B MURPHY, THOMAS J 

GILMORE, ROBERT J NOONAN, GEORGE F 

GRIFFIN, WARREN T SNELL, ORA M 

HALL, OSCAR A STANLEY, HARRY L 
HUMPHREY, J. F 

Appointed by the Board of Aldermen in January or February. Ord. 
Chap. 46, Sect. 1. 



MEASURERS OF GRAIN 



FENTON, ABRAM 
HARTWELL, GEO. W 
LAZELLE, FRANK W 
LIVINGSTON, WM. 
McPHETRES, SAMUEL A 
MURPHY, THOMAS J 



RYAN, ARNOLD J 
SMITH, LORENZO E 
SULLIVAN, JOHN B 
WILLIAMS, HENRY J 
WILSON, FRANKLIN T 
YARNOLD, RICHARD 



MULLANEY, JOHN J 

Fees — 2]/ 2 mills a bushel for measuring. Appointed by the Board of 
Aldermen in January or February. Ord. Chap. 41, Sect. 2. 



SURVEYORS 

ALLEN, MELANCTHON M 
BATEMAN, JOHN F 
CASEY, CLIFFORD B 
COBURN, CLARENCE G 
ERWIN, JAMES 
FENTON, ABRAM 
FORD, SETH 



OF LUMBER 

FULLER, GEORGE B 
MAYBERRY, OLIVER W 
McAULEY, KENNETH 

Mcdonald, murdock b 
mcleod, murdock k 

McPHEE, HARRY 

Mcpherson, arthur i 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER 



49 



FLANDERS, CHARLES S 
FLEMING, GEORGE A 
GALLUPE, ALLISON 
GILMAN, ALBERT I 
HALL, OSCAR A 
HARTWELL, GEO. W 
HUMPHREY, J F 
LAWRENCE, C F 
LAZELLE, FRANK W 
LINSCOTT, HIRAM E 
MARTIN, GEORGE 
McPHETRES, SAMUEL A 



MURPHY, THOMAS J 
NEALE, AUSTIN J 
PRATT, BLANCHARD E 
SANFORD, W A 
SLOAT, ELBRIDGE L 
SMITH, LORENZO E 
TRULL, FRED N 
WHITNEY, GEO. W 
WIGGIN, BURTON H 

WILSON, FRANKLIN T 
WOODWORTH, A B Jr 
YARNOLD, RICHARD 



Chosen by concurrent vote by nomination commencing in the Board 
of Aldermen in January or February. Ord. Chap. 41, Sect. 1. 



SURVEYORS OF PLASTERING, BRICK OR STONE 
WORK AND PAINTING 



BATEMAN, JOHN F 
BROOKS, HENRY O 
SMITH, MELVIN B 



FAVOR, WM A 
OSGOOD, ORIN F 
SNELL, ORA M 



Appointed by the Board of Aldermen in January or February. Ord. 
Chap. 41. Sect. 2. 



WEIGHERS OF HAY AND OTHER ARTICLES 

BEALS, LAFOREST CADY, GEO. L Jr 

BROWN, F L COBURN, CLARENCE G 

BUCKMINSTER, ROLLIN MARTIN, CHAS. G 

CADY, BYRON F McPHETRES, SAMUEL A 



5o 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER 



FENTON, ABRAM 
FITZ GIBBONS, WM. T 
HARTWELL, GEO. W 
HARRIS, MARTINA 
HUMPHREY, J F 
KENNEY, JOHN P. 
LAZELLE, FRANK W 
LARKIN, M J 
LIVINGSTON, WM. 
MORSE, ROBT. A 
MULLANEY, JOHN J 

Appointed by the Board of 
Chap. 21, Sect. i. 



MURPHY, THOMAS J 
NOONAN, GEO. F 
O'BRIEN, EVERETT 
RYAN, ARNOLD J 
SMITH, LORENZO E. 
SULLIVAN, JOHN B 
WILLIAMS, HENRY J 
WILSON, FRANKLIN T 
WOLFF, ABRAHAM 
YARNOLD, RICHARD 

Aldermen in January or February. Ord. 



WEIGHERS 

BUCKMINSTER, ROLLIN 
CAWLEY, WM. F 
CAWLEY, CATHERINE A 
CROTTY, MARY E 
CADY, BYRON F. 
CADY, GEO. L Jr 
CONLAN, M. BLANCHE 
DREWETT, EDWARD 
FENTON, ABRAM 
GORMLEY, HARRIET E 
GRIFFIN, WARREN T 
HOSMER, SAMUEL 
HUNKING, SIDNEY F 
BEALS, LAFOREST 



OF COAL 

HARTWELL, GEO. W 
LIVINGSTON, WM. E 
McPHETRES, SAMUEL A 
MOODY, GEO. H 
MORSE, ROBERT A 
MULLANEY, JOHN J 
MURPHY, THOMAS J 
, QUINN, JOHN P 

RUSHWORTH, CAARLES B 
RYAN, ARNOLD J 
SMITH, LORENZO E 
STANLEY, HARRY L 
WASHINGTON, GEORGE 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER 51 

BOARDMAN, BLANCHE G VIEIRA, JOHN R 

KENNEY, JOHN P WILSON, FRANKLIN T 

LANNAN, JAMES F WOLFF, ABRAHAM 

LAZELLE, FRANK W YARNOLD, RICHARD 
MARTIN, CHAS. G 

Appointed by the Board of Aldermen in January or February. Ord. 
Chap. 41, Sect 2. 



WILLIAM W. DUNCAN President 

ARTHUR K. WHITCOMB Secretary 



MEMBERS 

Ward i— WILLIAM W. DUNCAN Term expires 1905 

Tel. 662-2, Office, 21 Hildreth Building 

Ward 2— JOHN J. HANLON Term expires 1905 

Tel. 944-12. 169 Broadway 

Ward 3— ANDREW S. WOOD Term expires 1906 

598 School Street 

Ward 4— WILLI AM F. REGAN Term expires 1905 

Tel. 417-2 79 Kinsman Street 

Ward 5— EUGENE C. QUEEN AN Term expires 1906 

54 Pond Street 

Ward 6— HARRY SWANN Term expires 190b 

94 Beech Street 

Ward 7— ANDREW J. SWAPP Term expires 1905 

Tel. 330. 307 Pawtucket Street 

Ward 8— CHARLES W. TAYLOR, M. D Term"expires 1906 

Tel. 903-5. 17 Kirk Street. 

Ward 9— HUGH WALKER, D. D. S Term expires 1905. 

Tel. 189-13. 3 Wymans Exchange. 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER 53 

STANDING COMMITTEES 

i ON TKACHERS AND SALARIES— Messrs. Swapp, Duncan and 
Regan. 

2 ON BOOKS AND SUPPLIES— Messrs. Hanlon, Taylor, Swann, 

Wood and Walker. 

3 ON EVENING SCHOOLS— Messrs. Wood, Swapp, Taylor, Swann 

and Hanlon 

4. ON HIGH SCHOOL— Messrs. Duncan, Swapp, Taylor, Queenan 

and Regan 

5. ON EVENING DRAWING SCHOOLS— Messrs. Taylor, Duncan 

and Walker 

6. ON MUSIC — Messrs. Queenan, Wood and Hanlon 

7. ON REPORTS— Messrs. Walker, Wood and Hanlon 

8. ON ACCOUNTS— Messrs. Swann, Duncan and Queenan 

9. ON SCHOOL HOUSES AND HYGIENE— Messrs. Walker, Regan 

and Swann 
10. ON RULES — Messrs. Regan, Queenan and Swapp 



ASSIGNMENT OF SCHOOLS 

MR DUNCAN, Ward 1— High, Edson, Eliot, Kirk Street, Cottage Street 

MR. HANLON, Ward 2— Green, Worthen Street, Cheever Street, Mor- 
rill, Morrill Kindergarten 

MR. WOOD, Ward 3— Lincoln, Howard Street, Grand Street, Plain 
S£reet, Lincoln and Plain Street Kindergartens 

MR. REGAN, Ward 4— High, Butler, London Street, Weed Street, Aga- 
wani Street, Carter Street, Lyon Street, Agawam Street and 
Chapel Street Kindergartens 



54 MUNICIPAL REGISTER 

MR. QUEENAN, Ward 5— High, Charles Street, Central Street, Ames 
Street, Fayette Street, Charles Street Kindergarten 

MR. SWANN, Ward 6— Varnum, West Sixth Street, Tenth Street, Lake- 
view Avenue, Billings Street, Varnum Kindergarten 

MR. SWAPP, Ward 7— High, Bartlett, Pawtucket, Training, Cross Street, 
Cabot Street, New Moody Street, Lexington Avenue, Pawtucket 
and Bartlett Kindergartens 

MR. TAYLOR, Ward 8— High, Highland, Franklin, Dover Street, Pow- 
ell Street, Pine Street, Middlesex Village, Franklin, Dover and 
Pine Street Kindergartens 

MR. WALKER, Ward 9 -Moody, Pond Street, High Street, Sycamore 
Street, Moody Kindergarten 



Assignment of Evening Schools 

MR. WOOD— High, Edson, Railroad Street 

MR. SWAPP— Bartlett, Green, Cheever, Pawtucket 

MR. SWANN — Varnum, Aiken Avenue, Moody, Colburn 

MR. TAYLOR— Mann, Worthen 

MR. HANLON— Butler, Franklin 



Superintendent of Public Schools 

ARTHUR K. WHITCOMB Office, City Hall 

Telephone, 566-4 

Office Hours— One hour after the forenoon session of the schools, and 
from 2 to 3 o'clock on Saturday afternoon. 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER 55 

Truant Commissioners 

GEO. F. STURTEVANT WILLIAM F. THORNTON 

JAMES KELLY CAMILE ROUSSIN 

Telephone 506-4 

OFFICE— Third Floor in City Hall 

Office Hours — Saturday, 2 to 3 o'clock, p. m. Other days 4 to 5 p. m., 
except during the summer vacation, when the office will be open from 
9 to 10 o'clock a. m. 



Regular Meetings of the School Committee 

January 31 July 25 

February 28 August 29 

March 28 September 26 

April 25 October 31 

May 31 Nevember 28 

June 27 December 26 



Chp. 415. 

An Act to amend the charter of the City of Lowell. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows : 

Section 1. All executive powers which are now by law vested in the 
City Council of the City of Lowell, or either branch thereof, shall here- 
after be vested in and exercised by the Mayor of said city except as 
hereinafter otherwise provided. 

Sect. 2. The mayor may suspend or remove any executive or ad- 
ministrative officer except as hereinafter provided, for such cause as he 
shall deem sufficient, and shall set forth in the order of suspension or re- 
moval his reasons therefor, provided that no removal shall be made upon 
partisan grounds. The order of suspension or removal shall not take 
effect until it is approved by the City Council voting by yeas and nays. 
The City Council may, by a two-thirds vote in each branch, voting by 
yeas and nays, remove any of said officers without the consent of the 
Mayor ; provided, however, that nothing contained in this section shall 
apply to any of the following departments, namely : the School Commit- 
tee, the Police Commission, the Water Board, the Overseers of the Poor, 
or the Trustees of the Public Library. 

Sect. 3. There shall be a department of supplies, and all material 
and supplies for the city shall be purchased by the chief or head of such 
department, subject to the approval of the Mayor. So far as is practicable, 
purchases shall be after public advertisement and under contract approv- 
ed by the Mayor, All bills for material and supplies shall show the 
date of purchase, date of delivery, the unit of price, the quality and 
quantity of articles purchased and received, the number and date of the 
order for purchase, and if the purchase is under contract, the number 
and date of the contract, and shall be entered in full -in an invoice book, 
which shall always be open to public inspection. The chief of this de- 



58 MUNICIPAL REGISTER 

partmeut shall be elected by the qualified voters of the city voting at the 
annual municipal election, and shall hold his office for the next munici- 
pal year thereafter, subject to the provisions of section two of this act. 

Sect. 4. The Mayor shall cause to be kept a record of all his official 
acts, and to aid him in his official duties may appoint one or more clerks. 

Sect. 5. The heads of the several departments and offices shall have 
the power to appoint and employ and to discharge all subordinate officers 
and employees in their respective departments; and they shall keep a 
record, subject to inspection, of all so appointed and employed and of all 
discharged, and in all cases of discharge the grounds therefor ; provided, 
however, that no removals shall be made upon partisan grounds. 



Sect. 6. The heads of the several departments and offices shall have 
the general charge and management of all matters pertaining to their re- 
spective departments, and shall make and execute all contracts necessary 
therefor, except for the purchase of material and supplies ; but every 
contract made as aforesaid in which the amount involved exceeds three 
hundred dollars shall be approved by the Mayor before going into effect ; 
provided that nothing in this section shall be construed to prevent the 
City Council, by ordinance, from transferring any of the duties imposed 
upon an appointed head of a department by this act or by ordinance, ex- 
cepting the purchase of material and supplies, to another head of a de- 
partment or board or commission. 



Sect. 7. Neither the City Council nor either branch thereof, nor any 
committee or member thereof, shall directly or indirectly take part in 
the employment of labor, the purchase of material, the construction, 
alteration or repair of any public works or other property, or in the care, 
custody or management of the same, or in general in the expenditure of 
public money, or in the conduct of the executive or administrative busi- 
ness of the city, except as may be necessary for defraying the contingent 
and incidental expenses .of the City Council, or of either branch thereof ; 
nor shall they or either of them take part in the making of contracts. 



Sect. 8. No sum appropriated for a specific purpose shall be expend- 
ed for any other purpose ; and no expenditure shall be made and no lia- 
bility shall be incurred by or on behalf of the city until the City Council 
has duly voted an appropriation sufficient to meet such expenditure or 



MUNICIPAL RKGISTER 59 

liability, together with all prior unpaid liabilities which are payable 
therefrom, except that after the expiration of the financial year and be- 
fore the making of the regular annual appropriations, liabilities payable 
out of the regular appropriations may be incurred to an amount not ex- 
ceeding one-sixth of the total of the appropriation made for similar pur- 
poses in the preceeding year ; provided, however, that nothing herein 
contained shall be construed to restrict or limit the School Committee 
in any expenditure which it is now or may be hereafter authorized to 
make under any general law of the Commonwealth, or to restrict or 
limit payments on account of the permanent or temporary debt, or such 
as are required by law to be made to the Commonwealth. 



Sect. 9. All revenues and all monies accruing to the City of Lowell 
from any source whatever, except trust funds and the revenues of the 
Water Department, shall, when collected or paid into the treasury, be 
carried to one general account, to be known as the General Treasury 
Fund ; and all appropriations by or on behalf of said city, except from 
trust funds and on account of the Water Department, shall be from such 
fund and as provided in section ten of this act. 



Sect. 10 All bills or other claims, before they are finally certified 
by the Auditor or paid, shall pass the inspection of a committee of the 
City Council on accounts. Said committee shall consist of one member 
of the Board of Aldermen and two members of the Common Council, to 
be elected annually by ballot by the body they respectively represent. 
Said committee may report any such bill or claim to the City Council, 
with their reasons therefor, and no bill or claim so reported shall be 
passed by the Auditor, or be paid without the consent of the Council. 
Said committee may require the opinion of the City Solicitor as to the 
legality of a bill or other claim. 



Sect. 11. A yea and nay vote of the members of the City Council 
shall be required to pass any order or vote involving the expenditure or 
appropriation of the public monies, or involving any debt or liability, 
and said vote shall be entered upon the records of each branch of the 
City Council. 



Sect. 12. Less than a quorum of either branch of the City Council, 
or of the School Committee, or of the Board of Overseers of the Poor, 
may adjourn to a fixed day earlier than the next regular meeting, and 



60 MUNICIPAL REGISTER 



shall have power to compel the attendance of absent members in such 
manner as the City Council may by ordinance provide. 



Sect. 13. All acts or parts of acts and all ordinances of the City of 
Lowell inconsistent herewith are hereby repealed and annulled ; provid- 
ed, that no act or ordinance heretofore repealed shall thereby be revived >' 
and provided, also, that nothing in this act shall be taken to prohibit 
the City Council from abolishing any department, board, office or com- 
mission created by ordinance. 



Sect. 14. The question of the acceptance of this act shall be submit- 
ted to the qualified voters of the City of Lowell at the annual State elec- 
tion in the present year, and the affirmative votes of a majority of the 
voters present and voting thereon shall be required for such acceptance. 
If so accepted, so much thereof as provides for the election of a Chief of 
the Department of Supplies shall take effect at the next annual munici- 
pal election, and the act shall take full effect on the first Monday of Jan- 
uary in the year eighteen hundred and ninety-seven. [Approved May 16, 
1896. 



[Chap. 95.] 

An Act relative to the duties and powers of certain officers 
of the City of Lowell. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. The City Council of the City of Lowell, and each branch 
thereof, shall have and exercise all the power and authority relative to 
the election or appointment of city officers, or the confirmation of ap- 
pointments to office, which were vested in thern prior to the enactment of 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER 6l 

section one of chapter four hundred and fifteen of the acts of the year 
eighteen hundred and ninety-six. 

Sect. 2. The Chief of the Fire Department of said city shall be 
elected by concurrent vote of both branches of the City Council. 

Sect. 3. The City Council shall by ordinance determine what officers 
shall be the heads of the various departments of the City Government. 
The head of the department of supplies may sell or dispose of the per- 
sonal property' of the city, upon the recommendation of the Mayor and 
of the head of the department to which such property belongs, except 
the products of the City Farm, which the superintendent of said farm 
shall have the right to dispose of. 



Sect. 4. All ordinances of said city inconsistent herewith are hereby 
annulled, and all acts or parts of acts inconsistent herewith are hereby 
repealed. 

Sect. 5. This act shall take effect upon its passage. [Approved Feb- 
ruary 20, 1897. 



[Chap. 173.] 

An Act relative to appointments in the fire department of 
the City of Lowei<i,. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows : 

Section 1. The Chief Engineer of the Fire Department of the City 
of Lowell may, on the recommendation of the Board of Engineers, ap- 
point as members of the permanent force, or as call men, without civil 
service-examination, any person who has served as call or substitute call- 
man in said service for three or more successive years prior to the passage 
of this act. 



62 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER 



Sect. 2. Said Chief Engineer shall have the power to discharge all 
subordinate officers and employees in the Fire Department of said city, 
except the members of said board, and with the approval of said board, 
to appoint and employ all such officers and employees. 

Sect. 3. All acts and parts of acts inconsistent herewith are hereby 
repealed. 

Sect. 4. This act shall take effect upon its passage. [Approved 
March 15, 1898. 



Sec. 7, Chap. 26, Revised Laws. 



No election of a city officer by a municipal body or board shall be 
valid unless made by a viva voce vote, each member who is present 
answering to his name when it is called by the clerk or other proper offi- 
cer, stating the name of the person for whom he votes, or that he de- 
clines to vote. The clerk or other proper officer shall record every such 
vote. 



OF HE (Iff OF LOWELL. 

Passed Since 1894. 



An Ordinance authorizing the city treasurer to issue regis- 
tered CERTIFICATES, NOTES OR BONDS IN EXCHANGE FOR CERTIFI- 
CATES, NOTES OR BONDS PAYABLE TO BEARER. 

Be it ordained, etc., as follows : 

*The City Treasurer may, in accordance with the provisions of Sec- 
tion 5 of Chapter 77 of the Public Statutes, at the request of the owner 
or holder of any bond, promissory note sor certificate of indebtedness of 
the city of Lowell, at any time while more than one year remains before 
the principal of such bond, note or certificate is payable, issue in ex- 
change therefor a bond, note or certificate of same effect, payable to the 
owner or holder by name. 



The City Treasurer may also, under like conditions, issue registered 
certificates, in substitution for any mutilated, defaced or indorsed bonds, 
notes or certificates ; and where a bond, note or certificate of any issue 
has been lost or destroyed, the City Treasurer, under the direction of the 
joint standing committee on finance, may issue in place thereof a new 
bond, note or certificate of the same effect. 



The City Auditor, as well as the City Treasnrer, shall keep a register 
of the dates, numbers and amounts of all bonds, notes and certificates is- 
sued by the City Treasurer, showing to whom they were issued, when 
they are payable, and if issued in exchange, for what they were substitu- 
ted. [Approved May 12, 1896. 



*Now Sect. 4, Chapt. 73, Revised Laws. 



64 MUNICIPAL REGISTER 

An Ordinance amending section thirteen of chapter one of 
the revised ordinances so as to provide that the salaries 
and compensation of city officers when once established 
shall continue until re-established or changed. 

Be it ordained, etc., as follows : 

Section 13 of Chapter 1 of the Revised Ordinances is hereby amend- 
ed by striking out between the word "year" in the third line of said 
section and the word " provided " in the sixth line thereof, the following 
words : " for the year commencing on the first Monday of January next 
ensuing : and no change of salary shall be made to take effect during the 
time for which said salary was established," and inserting in place there- 
of the following: "provided that when such salaries and compensa- 
tion shall have been once established, they shall continue until re-estab- 
lished or changed in pursuance of the provisions of this section ; and," 
so that said section as amended shall read as follows : 

Section 13. The salaries and compensation of city officers shall be 
established in the month of December and after the annual municipal 
election shall have been held, in each year ; provided, that when such 
salaries and compensation shall have been once established, they shall 
continue until re-established or changed in pursuance of the provisions 
of this section ; and provided that is case any new office shall be created 
the salary of said newly created office may be fixed at any time ; and the 
salaries or compensation fixed for the payment of said officers shall be in 
full for all services performed by them by virtue of their offices ; and all 
sums of money received by them from any and every source, in discharge 
of said services, during any quarter oi the fiscal year, shall at the expira- 
tion of said quarter be by them paid over or accounted for to the City 
Treasurer. [Approved May 12, 1896. 



An Ordinance regulating the weighing and measuring of cer- 
tain ARTICLES PURCHASED BY THE CITY. 

Be it ordained, etc., as follows: 

All supplies of hay, grain, straw, coal, and any other material pur- 
chased for the use of the city or any department thereof exceeding one 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER 65 

hundred pounds in weight and usually weighed, shall be weighed on the 
city scales, and all wood purchased for said city shall be measured by the 
City Measurer of Wood, and no bills shall be paid by the City Treasurer 
or approved by any committee for such article so furnished the city, un- 
less the certificate of said weigher or measurer shall accompany or be 
attached to said bill. [Approved May 12, 1896. 



An Ordinance to prevent the placing of ashes, gi^ass, crock- 
ery, ETC., IN OR ON THE PUBLIC STREETS OR WAYS. 

Be it ordained, etc., as follows : 

Section 1. Any person who shall put or place, or cause to be put or 
placed, in or upon any street, lane or alley, or other public place in this 
city, any ashes, glass, crockery, scrap iron, nails, tacks or any other arti- 
cle which would be liable to injure the feet of children or animals, or the 
tires of bicycles or other vehicles which have wheels with rubber or 
pneumatic tires, shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor. 



Sect. 2. Any person violating the provisious of the preceding sec- 
tion or who is guilty of the misdemeanor therein described, shall be lia- 
ble to a fine of not less than two dollars or more than twenty dollars for 
each offence. [Approved Oct. 9, 1896. 



An Ordinance amending sections one and nine of chapter 
twenty of the ordinances of the city of i,oweiyl. 

Be it ordained, etc., as follows : 

Section 1. That section 1, of Chapter 20 of the Ordinances of the 
City of Lowell be and the same is hereby amended by inserting after the 
word "engineer" in the second line of said section, the words "a first 



66 .MUNICIPAL REGISTER 

assistant engineer and three other," and by striking out the word " four " 
in the second line of said section, and by inserting after the word "re- 
moved " in the sixteenth line of said section, the words "the first assist- 
ant engineer shall be appointed by the Mayor and Aldermen in the 
month of March or April, or whenever a vacancy occurs, and he shall 
enter upon the discharge of the duties of his office on the first day of 
May of the year in which appointed, if appointed for a full term 
prior to May of any year, and he shall hold said office for a term of three 
years from said first day of May, and until his successor is appointed, or 
he is removed ; and if appointed after the first day of May in any year, 
he shall enter upon the duties of said office forthwith and shall continue 
therein until the expiration of the full term as existing at the time of 
said appointment, or until removed," and by inserting between the words 
"said" and "assistant" in the seventeenth line of said section, the 
word " other " and by inserting after the word " engineer " in the twenty- 
eighth line of said section, and before the word "shall" in the twenty- 
ninth line of said section, the words "and first assistant engineer," 
so that said section shall read as follows : 



Section i. The Fire Department shall consist of a Chief Engineer, 
a First assistant engineer, who shall perform such duties as may be re- 
quired of him by the Chief Engineer, and three other assistant engineers 
and as many enginemen, hosemen, hook and laddermen and other per- 
sons, to be divided into companies, as the number of engines and other 
fire apparatus of the city shall from time to time require ; the Chief Engi- 
neer shall be appointed by the Mayor and Aldermen in the month of 
March or April, and whenever a vacancy occurs, and he shall enter upon 
the discharge of the duties of said office on the first day of May of the 
year in which appointed, if appointed for a full term prior to May of any 
year, and he shall hold said office for the term of three years from said 
first day of May or until he is removed ; and if appointed after the first 
day of May of any year, he shall enter upon the discharge of the duties 
of said office forthwith, and shall continue therein until the expiration of 
the full term as existing at the time of his said appointment, or until re- 
moved. The First Assistant Engineer shall be appointed by the Mayor 
and Alderriien in the month of March or April, and whenever a vancancy 
occurs, and he shall enter upon the discharge of the duties of his office 
on the first day of May of the year in which appointed, if appointed for 
a full term prior to May of any year, and he shall hold said office for a 
term of three years from said first day of May and until his successor is 
appointed or he is removed ; and if appointed after the first day of May 
in any year, he shall enter upon the duties of said office forthwith, and 
shall continue therein until the expiration of the full term as existing at 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER 67 

the time of his said appointment, or until he is removed ; and the appoint- 
ment of said other assistant engineers shall be made by the Mayor and 
Aldermen in the month of March or April annually, and whenever a 
vacancy occurs, and they shall hold their respective offices for the term 
of one year from the first day of May succeeding their appointment, or 
until others are chosen ; all other members of the Fire Department 
shall be nominated by the Board of Engineers, and their names sent to 
the Mayor and Aldermen, and when by them appointed they shall be 
members of the Fire Department ; provided, that vacancies may be filled 
at any time, and that the Mayor and Aldermen may at any time remove 
any and all of said officers or members ; except that the Chief Engineer 
and First Assistant Engineer shall not be removed without a hearing and 
cause shown thereat. No person shall be appointed a member of the 
Fire Department who does not sustain a good moral character and who is 
not a citizen of the City of Lowell. 



Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. [Approv- 
ed Nov. 27, 1896. 



An Ordinance in relation to an ordinance on openings and 
excavations in streets and imposing a penalty. 

Be it ordained, etc., as follows : 

. Section 1. No person, firm or corporation shall dig up, make any 
excavation in, or in any manner change or interfere with the surface or 
grade of any street for the purpose of laying water, gas or sewer pipes or 
railway tracks, or tor any other purpose, without first giving notice to 
the Superintendent of Streets, which notice shall state specifically the 
time when work will be commenced and the probable time within which 
it shall be completed. 



Sect. 2. When any opening or excavation shall be made in any 
street in pursuance of Section 1, the Superintendent of Streets, by him- 
self or by a servant or agent appointed by him for that purpose, shall see 
that the surface of such streets is left in good order and condition for 



68 MUNICIPAL REGISTER 



public travel thereon. The expense for labor and material used in clos- 
ing and covering such excavation shall in all cases be borne by the party 
causing the same to be made. 



Sect. 3. Said Superintendent shall, when about to build a new sewer 
or repair an old one. notify all the abutters on that part of the line of 
said sewer when he proposes to do work, so that said abutters may enter 
said sewer. He shall notify all abutters, when about to construct a new 
street, at least four weeks before beginning work, and when about to 
make a new surface of any street, at least two weeks before beginning 
work, shall notify the Superintendent of Lamps and Water Board and all 
persons authorized to place any obstructions in such street, and shall re- 
quire and see that all said departments or persons having any work to be 
done in the street so designated, shall do all such work before the surface 
of such street is again prepared for and opened to public travel, and after 
the completion of the work then done in such street, shall not permit 
any department or person who shall have been so notified, for the space 
of two years, to again disturb the surface of such street or way within 
the area of such previous disturbance, except in case of obvious necessi- 
ty, to be verified in writing to, and approved by the Mayor, and except in 
cases of tracks or leaks in pipes, sewers or wires. 



Sect 4. Any person, firm or corporation who shall dig up, make 
any excavations, or in any way change or alter the grade or surface of 
any accepted street, without giving the notice mentioned in Section 1 of 
this ordinance, shall be punished by a fine not exceeding twenty dollars. 



Sect. 5. All ordinances and parts of ordinances, resolutions and or- 
ders of the City Council inconsistent herewith, are hereby repealed. 
[Approved November 27, 1896. 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER 69 

An Ordinance creating the office of superintendent of com- 
mons AND PROVIDING FOR THE ELECTION OF SUCH OFFICER. 

(Superceded by Chap. 28, Revised Laws.) 

Be it ordained, etc., as follows : 

Section 1. There shall be chosen by concurrent vote of both branches 
of the City Council in the month of January, 1898, a Superintendent of 
Commons ; and in the month of January in each year thereafter, the City 
Council by concurrent vote of both branches shall elect a Superintend- 
ent of Commons who shall hold his office for one year and until his suc- 
cessor is chosen, but said officer may be removed from office at any time 
by a two-third's vote of both branches of the City Council voting by yeas 
and nays. Any vacancy which may occur in said office shall be filled 
in like manner by concurrent vote of the City Council for the remain- 
der of the unexpired term. 



Sect. 2. Said Superintendent of Commons shall be the head of the 
Department of Commons, and shall have the care and control of all 
the commons and parks of the city, and of all the property connected 
with said department, and shall have the general care and management 
of all matters pertaining to said department ; shall make and execute all 
contracts necessary therefor, except the purchase of material and sup- 
plies, but every contract made as aforesaid in which the amount involved 
exceeds three hundred dollars, shall be approved by the Mayor before 
going into effect. [Approved June 18, 1897. 



An Ordinance amending section twelve of chapter five of the 
revised ordinances. 

Be it ordained, etc., as follows : 

That section 12 of the Revised Ordinances of the City of Lowell be 
and the same is hereby amended by striking out the words " nor on either 



70 MUNICIPAL REGISTER 

side of Westford Street from the westerly line of Grand Street to the 
easterly line of Royal Street for a distance of fifty feet back from either 
line of Westford Street. [Approved July 21, 1897. 



An Ordinance amending section fifteen, chapter thirty-nine 
of the revised ordinances of the year fighteen hundred 
and ninty-four. 

Be it ordained, etc., as follows : 

That section 15, Chapter 39, of the Revised Ordinances of the year 
1894, be and is hereby amended by striking out of the seventh line the 
word "forty-third," and inserting in place thereof the word "forty- 
fifth." [Approved July 21, 1897. 



An Ordinance regulating hawkers and peddlers. 

Be it ordained, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. No person shall hawk or peddle, sell or expose for sale 
within said city any of the articles enumerated in Section 1 of Chapter 
68* of the Public Statutes, until he has been duly licensed by and has 
recorded his name and residence with the Board of Police of the City of 
Lowell, and has been assigned a number by said board, to be worn in such 
manner as said board may prescribe. Provided, however, that the fore- 
going provisions shall not apply to any other person than the one named 
in the license. 



Sect. 2. No person hawking, peddling or selling, or exposing for 
sale any of the articles enumerated in Section 1 of Chapter 68* of the 
Public Statutes, shall cry his wares to the disturbance of the peace and 
comfort of the inhabitants of the city. 

*Now Chapter 65, Sect. 15, 16, of the Revised Laws. 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER 71 

• 

Sect. 3. No hawker or peddler shall carry or convey any of the ar- 
ticles enumerated in Chapter 68* of the Public Statutes in any manner 
that will tend to injure the public health, or disturb the public peace or 
comfort, nor otherwise than in vehicles and receptacles which have print- 
ed on them in letters and figures at least two inches in height the name 
of the person selling and the number given him by the Board of Police. 



Sect. 4. Whoever violates any of the provisions of the preceding 
sections of this ordinance shall be liable to a penalty of not more than 
twenty dollars for each offence. [Approved July 29, 1897.* 



An Ordinance to amend section eighteen of chapter six of 
the city ordinances relating to the hitching of horses 
to lamp posts. 

Be it ordained, etc., as follows : 

Section 18 of Chapter 6 of the City Ordinances is hereby amended 
by striking out all after the word " any " in the third line thereof and in- 
serting instead thereof the words " lamp posts maintained by the city," 
so that said section as amended shall read as follows : 

Sect. 18. No owner, driver or other person having the care or order- 
ing of a vehicle shall hitch or fasten the horse or horses attached thereto 
to any lamp post maintained by the city. [Approved January 1, 1898. 



An Ordinance authorizing the city treasurer to prescribe 
the system of bookkeeping for certain departments and 
officers receiving money belonging to the city and pro- 
VIDING FOR MORE FREQUENT RETURNS OF SUCH MONEY TO THE 
CITY TREASURY. 

Be it ordained, etc., as follows : 

Section 1. All departments and officers of the City Government ex- 



72 MUNICIPAL REGISTER 

cept the City Treasurer, whose official duty requires the receipt of money 
belonging to the city, shall keep such books and records relating to the 
same as shall be prescribed by the City Treasurer. 



Sect. 2. The heads of each department and officers receiving money 
for the city shall remit to the Treasurer as often as once in each month 
any balance that may be in the possession of such department or officer 
belonging to the city, except in case when the time for such payment 
into the City Treasury is prescribed by statute. 



Sect. 3. The Joint Committee on Accounts shall annually in con- 
nection with the annual examination of the accounts of the City Treas- 
urer, examine, investigate and audit the books and accounts of all depart- 
ments and officers receiving money for the city, and said committee shall 
make report of such examination to the City Council. 



Sect. 4. All heads of departments and officers whose official duty re- 
quires the rendering of bills to individuals, cities or towns for charges of 
any nature, shall hereafter deliver all such bills to the City Treasurer for 
collection through his office. 



Sect. 5. Section 9 of Chapter 1 of the Revised Ordinances and all 
ordinances and parts of ordinances inconsistent herewith are hereby re- 
pealed. [Approved Jaunary 1, 1898. 



An Ordinance providing for estimates for appropriations and 
for other purposes. 

Be it ordained, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. At the beginning of each municipal year and not later 
than the third Tuesday in January the Mayor shall make and transmit to 
the City Council an estimate of the expenditures required for the year. 
Such estimate shall be framed and itemized so as to show separately : 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER 73 

Par. 2. The amounts required by each department, office, board, 
commission or other sub-division of the executive branch of the govern- 
ment, and so far as may be practicable for the sub-division of the work 
of each department. 



Par. 3. The salary or compensation of each officer, deputy, assist- 
ant, clerk, or employee of the city not classed as a laborer. The amounts 
required for labor shall, when practicable, be stated separately from 
those for materials and supplies. 



Par. 4. Such estimate shall be in such lorm as to show in parallel 
columns, opposite each item, the amount paid for the previous year, and 
the amount unexpended at the close of such year. 



Sect. 2. The Mayor shall make, or cause to be made, and shall 
transmit to the City Council with the estimate required by the preceding 
section : 



Par. 2. An itemized estimate of the revenues of the year from all 
sources except taxation of real and personal property and polls. 



Par. 3. A statement of the balance unpaid at the close of the previ- 
ous year on account of temporary loans, and the amount due by financial 
years, as unpaid taxes on real and personal property and polls. 



Par. 4. An itemized statement of the debt, with interest becoming 
due during the year, and the margin available for loans within the debt 
limit for the year. 



Par. 5. An itemized statement of all orders, etc., of the City Coun- 
cil involving expenditures which have not been appropriated for. In all 
cases the finances of the water service shall be shown separately. 



Sect. 3. All regular annual appropriations shall be for and only ap- 



74 MUNICIPAL REGISTER 

plicable to the liabilities incurred during the year in which they are 
made, any form of phraseology in the order, resolution or vote providing, 
for the same, to the contrary notwithstanding. 



Par. 2. It shall be the duty of the Auditor to close all regular 
annual appropriation accounts with the last secular day in December 
of the year for which the appropriations are made, and to credit the gen- 
eral treasury fund account or accounts with the water service, as the case 
may be, with the balance to the credit of such appropriations ; and there- 
after no payment shall be made under such appropriations. He shall 
promptly report to the City Council the amount of each balance thus 
credited, and amount available in the general treasury fund, and the 
account with the water service, for the expenditures of the current year 
not otherwise appropriated. 



Par. 3. All claims, accounts and bills against the City of Lowell 
under such appropriations remaining unpaid at such date, shall be num- 
bered consecutively, and be entered by the Auditor in such order, in a 
permanent book of record, to be known as the register of claims, so as to 
show the name of the claimant, the amount claimed and allowed, the na- 
ture of the service and the action had thereon. The Auditor shall trans- 
mit to the City Council, on or before the first regular meeting night in 
February, of either branch of the City Council, a schedule of such claims 
with a condensed statement of the nature of each claim, and the action 
had thereon. 



Sect. 4. The several estimates and statements called for by this 
ordinance shall on theis receipt by either branch of the City Council be 
referred, without other action, to the Joint Committee on Appropriations, 



Par. 2. The Committee on Appropriations shall consist of the Chair- 
man and two additional members of the Board of Aldermen and the 
President and three additional members of the Common Council. 



Section 6 of Chapter 1 of the Ordinances of the City of Lowell is 
hereby repealed. 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER 75 



Par. 3. Said committee shall have access to all or any of the records 
and official papers of the city, shall have power to require from any offi- 
cer or employee of the city such additional statement or statements relat- 
ing to the expenditures and revenues of the city as it may deem essential, 
and to summon any officer or employee of the city to be present at any 
designated meeting of said committee ; and to remain in attendance until 
discharged by the committee ; and any officer or employee who shall fail 
or refuse to comply with such request, order or summons, may be report- 
ed to the City Council or either branch thereof, for such action as it may 
have the power to take and see fit to exercise. 



Sect. 5. The Committee on Appropriations shall make a final report 
in print, not exceeding two hundred copies, to the City Council or either 
branch thereof, on or before the fifteenth day of February of each year 
unless granted further time by the City Council. 



Sect. 6. All ordinances or parts of ordinances conflicting with this 
ordinance are hereby repealed. [Approved January 1, 1898. 



An Ordinance providing for the appointiment of an inspector 
of wires and defining the duties of such officer, in ac- 
cordance with chapter four hundred and four, acts of 

1890.*. 

Be it ordained, etc., as follows : 

Section 1. Within thirty days after the passage of this Ordinance, 
there shall be appointed by the Mayor, subject to confirmation by the 
Board of Aldermen, an Inspector of Wires for the City of Lowell, who 
shall enter upon the duties of his office immediately, and shall hold said 
office, unless sooner removed, until the first day of February, 1901, and 
prior to the first day of February, 1901, and prior to the first day of Feb- 
ruary of every third year thereafter, there shall be appointed in like 

•Now Chapter 122, Revised Laws. 



76 MUNICIPAL REGISTER 

manner an Inspector of Wires who shall hold his office during a term of 
three years and until his successor is appointed, unless sooner removed 
in the manner prescribed by law. 



Sect. 2. Said Inspector of Wires shall perform the duties prescribed 
by Section 3, Chapter 404 of the Acts of 1890,* and such other duties as 
are or may be hereafter prescribed by the laws of the Commonwealth or 
the ordinances of the city. He shall annually in the month of January 
make a report to the City Council of the business of his office for the 
year ending the thirty-first day of December next preceding. [Approv- 
ed July 15, 1898. 



An Ordinance relating to the permanent repairs on streets 
and the placing of underground services therein ; also 
to the necessary repairs of same. 

Be it ordained, etc., as follows : 

Section 1. That before any street is paved with granite, concrete or 
other paving, macadamized or otherwise put in permanent repair by the 
city, the owners of land abutting on such street shall be notified at least 
four weeks previous to the time when such permanent improvements are 
to be commenced, that all underground services, whether for sewer, water, 
gas, electrical or other connections, shall be constructed and placed in 
said street previous to the date set for the making of said permanent 
improvements. 



Sect. 2. That all corporations or individuals having services laid in 
said street, or intending or desiring to construct the same, whether for 
gas, electric, telephone, telegraph, or for any service of whatsoever na- 
ture, or who shall desire to renew or repair services already constructed, 
shall be notified by the posting of a notice at the City Hall of the inten- 
tion of the city to so repair such street, and by a notice which shall be 
published for six#consecutive days in one morning and one evening news- 
paper printed in the city of Lowell, the last publication of said notice to 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER 77 

be at least three weeks previous to the time stated for making said per- 
manent improvements. 



Sect. 3. That when any street has been so paved, macadamized, or 
otherwise put in permanent repair, it shall not be opened or torn up 
for the placing of any new underground construction of any nature what- 
soever during five years next succeeding the date in said published 
and posted notices stating the intention of the city to place said street in 
permanent repair ; provided, however, that in case repairs to any service 
become necessary, the same may be made after a permit has been granted 
by the Board of Aldermen, and said repairs shall be made under the su- 
pervision of the Superintendent'of Streets. In case of leakage of gas or 
water pipes, the same may be repaired at once by the Gas Company or 
Water Board, and the surface of the street placed in a condition satisfac- 
tory to the Superintendent of Streets. 



Sect. 4. Wherever on said street there may be unimproved land, 
and where no sewer, gas, water or other necessary services have been 
constructed, the same shall be laid and constructed, to a point at least 
two feet beyond the outside line of the sidewalk on said street, one each 
of the services mentioned for gas, water and sewer connections, for each 
fifty feet of frontage of the said land on said street, or at such distances 
as may be agreed upon by the owner of said land and the Superintendent 
of Streets. In case of neglect of the owner or of a corporation or indi- 
vidual to construct the same, said service for sewer, water and gas con- 
nections may be constructed by the city, and shall be paid for by the par- 
ties to whom rightfully belongs the construction of the same. 



Sect. 5. Any violation of the foregoing conditions in regard to the 
digging up of streets shall be punished by a fine of not less than twenty 
dollars ($20). 



Sect. 6. All ordinances and parts of ordinances inconsistent here- 
with are hereby repealed. [Approved August 5, 1898. 



78 MUNICIPAL REGISTER 

An Ordinance providing for the appointment of a superinten- 
dent AND ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT OF STATE AID. 

Be it ordained, etc., as follows: 



Section i. Within thirty days after the passage of this ordinance 
there shall be appointed by the Mayor, subject to confirmation of the 
Board of Aldermen, a Superintendent of State Aid and an Assistant 
Superintendent of State Aid for the City of Lowell, who shall enter upon 
the duties of their offices immediately and shall hold said offices, unless 
sooner removed, until j the first day of February, 1899 ; and prior to the 
first day of February, 1899, and prior to the first day of February of 
every year thereafter, there shall be appointed in like manner a Superin- 
tendent of State Aid and an Assistant Superintendent of State Aid, who 
shall hold their offices during a term of one year and until their succes- 
sors are appointed, unless sooner removed in the manner prescribed by 
law. 



Sect. 2. Said Superintendent of State Aid shall disburse State Aid 
and City Aid under the direction of the Mayor and Board of Aldermen as 
prescribed by *Chapter 279 of the Acts of 1893, *Chapters 279 and 301 of 
the Acts of 1894, *Chapter 279 of the Acts of 1896, *Chapter 561 of the 
Acts of 1898, or any other laws of the Commonwealth, or that may be 
hereafter prescribed by the ordinances of the city. He shall annually, in 
the month of January, make a report to the City Council of the business 
of his office for the year ending on the thirty-first of December next 
preceding. 



Sect. 3. Said Assistant Superintendent of State Aid shall perform 
such duties as may be prescribed by the Superintendent of State Aid. 
[Approved September 27, 1898. 

*Now Chapt 79, Revised Laws. 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER 79 

An Ordinance amending section six of chapter nine of the 

revised ordinances of the city of lowell. 
Be it ordained, etc., as follows: 



That Chapter 9 of the Revised Ordinances of the City of Lowell be 
amended by striking out Section 6 and substituting therefor the 
following : 



Sect. 6. The City Treasurer shall receive and have the care and cus- 
tody of all sums of money paid the city by persons for the perpetual care 
of lots in any of the city cemeteries, and give the vouchers of the city 
therefor, and money so received shall constitute a special fuud to be 
known as the " Cemetery Fund for the perpetual care of lots." The 
Treasurer shall not receive a sum of money less than one hundred dollars 
($100.00) for the perpetual care of lots in any of the city cemeteries or 
public burial grounds. The Treasurer shall notify the Superintendent of 
the cemetery^of all such payments, together with the description of the 
lots and graves on account of which such payments are made, and 
annually, at such times as the Trustees of Public Burial Grounds request, 
shall pay over to them four per centum as interest upon all sums so paid 
to and receipted by him. The Treasurer shall invest the moneys of this 
fund in securities in which by law the funds of savings banks may be 
invested, and pay the amount of interest realized thereon into the City 
Treasury. [Approved October 11, 1898. 



An Ordinance relating to the construction and repair of 
buildings. 

Be it ordained, etc., as follows : 

Section 1. Before the repair, erection, construction or material 
alteration of any building, the owner, architect or builder thereof shall 
file with the Superintendent of Buildings a statement in writing, giving 
the intended location of such building, its dimensions, materials, manner 
of construction and estimated cost. If such a building is to be repaired, 



8o MUNICIPAL REGISTER 



erected or materially altered within the fire limits of the city, such owner 
architect or builder shall, in addition to the statement aforesaid, submit 
for examination full specifications and plans of the proposed repairs, 
buildings or alterations ; the owner or contractor shall also sign an agree- 
ment that the proposed work shall be done in accordance with the 
description set forth in such plans, specifications and statement, and all 
such matters and things connected with such work shall be done in strict 
compliance with this chapter. If it appears from said statement, plans 
and specifications that the building to be erected, altered or repaired will 
conform to the provisions of this chapter, so far as applicable thereto, 
then the Superintendent of Buildings shall issue a permit. No person 
shall repair, construct or materially alter any building without such 
permit. 



Sect. 2. The Superintendent of Buildings shall furnish suitable 
blanks upon which applications shall be made ; and such applications 
shall be recorded by the Assessors in a book provided for the purpose, 
each page of which shall be a duplicate of such application for the erec- 
tion, construction or material alteration of any building in the City of 
Lowell after the passage of this ordinance. 

Sect. 3. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. [Approv- 
ed December 29, 1898. (Amended 1901.) 



An Ordinance relating to assessment of taxes in the city of 
LOWELL. 

Be it ordained, etc., as follows : 

Chapter 3 of the Revised Ordinances of 1894 is hereby amended by 
striking out all after Section 1 of said chapter, and substituting in place 
thereof the following : 



Sect. 2. The Board of Assessors shall annually, in the month of 
January, or as soon as practicable thereafter, organize, by choosing one of 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER 8 1 

their number to act as Chairman ; said Chairman shall not receive extra 
compensation, and all members of the Board shall devote their whole 
time to the service of the city. 



Sect. 3. It shall be the duty of the Assessors of Taxes to complete 
their assessment and place the list of taxes in the hands of the Collector 
of Taxes on or before the first day of September, annually; and they 
shall, on or before the first day of September, annually, indicate on said 
list the residence of the several taxpayers for that year and the year 
next preceding. 



Sect. 4. When any tax shall be abated in whole or in part by the 
Assessors of Taxes, they shall make a record thereof in a book to be kept, 
by them for that purpose, which record shall contain the names of all 
persons whose taxes may be so abated, and the reasons for such abate- 
ment ; and they shall also annually, in the month of January, make out 
and transmit to the City Council a full report of the work of their Board, 
said report to show the total valuation of the city, amount of real estate, 
amount of personal estate, total corporation valuation in detail, total 
valuation in bank stock, street-watering assessment, number of polls, 
name, amount and reason of any abatement of taxes and such other 
items as may be of interest to the public. Said figures to be in a column 
parallel to a column containing the figures of the preceding year. 



Sect. 5. The Assessors shall annually, on the thirty-first day of 
December, report to the Auditor, all abatement of taxes made by them 
during the year ending on said day, distinguishing the abatements made 
on the different years' taxes, and whether abated before or after collec- 
tion. 



Sect. 6. The Assessors shall have full power to hire as many tempo- 
rary clerks, not to exceed six, as may be necessary to assist them in the 
performance of their duties, the compensation of said clerks not to exceed 
two dollars and fifty cents per day, and they shall only be employed dur- 
ing the months of May to September inclusive. Provided, however, that 
permanent clerks, not to exceed two, one to be known as Chief Clerk, 
may be employed the whole year at such compensation as the Board may 
determine. They shall also have the power to employ six temporary 
assistants during the months of May and June for the purpose of obtain- 



* 



82 MUNICIPAL REGISTER 



ing the list of polls and incidental personal property, compensation not 
to exceed three dollars per day. Said Assistant Assessors shall be 
appointed by the Mayor, subject to confirmation by the Board of Alder- 
men and Common Council. 



Sect. 7. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. [Approv- 
ed February 28, 1899. 



An Ordinance establishing an inspection of wires department, 
and governing the same. 

Be it ordained, etc, as follows : 



Section 1. An Inspection of Wires Department is hereby estal- 
lished, of which the Inspector of Wires shall be the head. 



Sect. 2. The Inspector of Wires shall have supervision of all electric 
and other wires erected upon, over or under any street, way or building, 
and of every wire within any building where such wire is designed to 
carry an electric current, and shall have authority over, and shall inspect 
such wires, their condition, attachments, insulation, supports and appli- 
ances ; he shall require all persons and corporations owning or operating 
wires to place and arrange all posts, arms, fixtures, insulating supports, 
attachments and appliances so as to secure safety to life and property, 
and shall see that the provisions of *Chapter 404 of the Acts of 1890 and 
all other laws, ordinances and regulations relating to electric and other 
wires are strictly enforced, and shall give prompt notice to any person or 
corporation owning or operating any such wire, when in his judgment 
the same is unsafe, or is not placed, kept and maintained in accordance 
with the requirements of said chapter or the provisions of any other law, 
ordinance or regulation. 



Sect. 3. Said Inspector shall, at least once in each year, inspect all 
posts supporting electric or other wires upon or over any street or build- 

*Now Chapt. 122 Revised Laws. 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER 83 



ing, and all supports of such wires when attached to buildings, and ascer- 
tain if said posts and supports are kept in proper condition and not weak- 
ened by decay or other causes ; and in case any person or corporation 
owning, leasing, or operating wires shall neglect or refuse to maintain 
said supports in proper condition for safety, the Inspector shall cause said 
fixtures and supports to be put in proper condition at the expense of the 
person or corporation owning or operating the same, after first giving the 
person or corporation due notice in writing of his intended action. 



Sect. 4. It shall be the duty of the Inspector to cause to be removed 
all dead wires of whatever nature, attached to buildings, if, in his judg- 
ment, they are in a dangerous condition or liable to become dangerous to 
life or property, and he shall notify in writing the person or corporation 
owning, leasing or operating such wires of his desire for the removal of 
any wire, and give them at least ten days in which to comply with the 
requirements, except in cases in which, in his judgment, there is immedi- 
ate liability of injury to person or property from the wire and in all 
such cases the notice shall require their removal forthwith. In the event 
of the refusal of any person or corporation to take proper action, the In- 
spector may cause the work to be done and the expense to be charged to 
the owners. 



Sect. 5. No person or corporation shall allow any piece of wire to 
be left on the surface of any street or sidewalk, or to permit unused fix- 
tures, coils or loose ends of wire to remain attached to any cross arm or 
post more than twenty-four hours without special permission. 



Sect. 6. Every person or corporation operating electric or other 
wires over or under any street, way or building in the city, upon request 
of the Inspector shall furnish within fifteen days thereafter accurate lists 
of the posts or other supports of their wires, the location of conduits and 
manholes, with information as to location, where, and what service is 
rendered, whether telegraphic, telephonic, power or electric lighting, 
and in the latter case, whether arc or incandescent current is used. 



Sect. 7. The said Inspector, upon request, shall also be furnished 
by any person or corporation operating or owning electric wires with 
such information as to kind, size and tested strength of supporting 



84 MUNICIPAL REGISTER 



or service wires, the maximum volts used, together with such other 
information as may be necessary to the faithful and effectual discharge of 
his duties. 



Sect. 8. All wires, appliances and apparatus in the interior of 
public buildings or on private premises which are intended for the trans- 
mission of electricity, either for isolated lighting or power, or to be con- 
nected with an outside circuit, shall be made, placed and arranged, and 
at all times kept safe to the satisfaction of the Inspector ; and said 
Inspector may at all proper and reasonable times have access to such 
wires and apparatus. 



Sect. 9. In no case shall a current of electricty be connected to any 
system of wiring or apparatus intended to be used for power or lighting, 
without permission being first obtained and a written permit granted by 
the Inspector of Wires ; the jurisdiction of the Inspector is intended to 
include all public and private electrical systems that are now and may 
hereafter be installed in the City of Lowell. 



This ordinance is not intended to govern or call for the inspection of 
electric bell systems, private or public telephones inside of public or 
private buildings, or the interior apparatus or boxes of the fire alarm or 
police system of the city. 



Sect. 10. No person or corporation shall change the position or 
make additions to any wiring system, or install any new work or elec- 
trical apparatus without first notifying the Inspector, and he given full 
opportunity to inspect the same before such work is completed ; and 
when any electric wires designed to carry an electric light or power 
current are to be concealed, the Inspector must be notified before work is 
commenced, and he shall give his permission and approval for all such 
work and connections immediately, unless in his judgment such apparatus 
or wiring endangers life or property or is not in accordance with the laws 
and ordinances, or in conformity with the established insurance rules. 



Sect. 11. The Inspector shalt require that the established rules and 
regulations of the National Board of Fire Underwriters shall be complied 
with, both for outside and interior construction. 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER 85 



Sect. 12. It shall be the duty of the Inspector of Wires to carry out 
any order of the Mayor and Board of Aldermen on any matters referred 
to him by them, coming under the laws or ordinances, and all questions 
of right and authority shall be detemined by the Mayor and Board of 
Aldermen upon any appeal or refusal of any person or corporation to 
comply with the requirements of the Inspector and the laws and 
ordinances. 



Sect. 13. The Inspector of Wires shall keep a record of all inspec- 
tions and permits in a book provided for the purpose and this book shall 
be open to inspection (at all reasonable times) by any interested parties. 



The Inspector shall make monthly reports of his doings to the 
Mayor and Board of Aldermen, and an annual report to the City 
Council. 



Sect. 14. Whoever violates or fails to comply with any of the pro- 
visions of this ordinance after, being duly notified in writing by the 
Inspector shall forfeit and pay for each offence not less than ten or more 
than twenty dollars. 



Sect. 15. The Inspector of Wires shall be on duty eight hours per 
day, from 9 A. M. till 5 P. M. each regular working day, and at such 
other times as cases of emergency may require, and shall receive such 
compensation as may be determined by the City Council. Said Inspector 
shall devote his whole time to the service of the city, and shall engage 
in no other business or calling. [Approved July 26, 1899. 



An Ordinance to provide for the election of a city physician 
and defining his duties. 

Be it ordained, etc., as follows : 

Section I. There shall be chosen immediately after the approval of 
this ordinance and thereafter annually in the month of March or April, 



86 MUNICIPAL REGISTER 



and whenever a vacancy occurs, by concurrent vote of both branches of 
the City Council, a City Physician, who shall enter upon the duties of his 
office on the first day of May in each year and until his successor is 
chosen, unless sooner removed therefrom in the manner provided by 
law. 



Sect. 2. It shall be the duty of the City Physician to attend upon all 
patients under the care of the city authorities at the City Farm or Police 
Station ; to make a report annually in April to the City Council covering 
the service rendered by him during the previous year. In case of an 
alarm by any infectious or contagious disease to give to either branch of 
the City Council or any committee thereof all such professional advice 
and council as they may request of him, and generally to perform such 
other professional services as may reasonably be required of him by the 
Mayor or the City Council, or the Superintendent of the City Farm. 



Sect. 3. Chapter 12 of the Revised Ordinances is hereby repealed. 
[Approved June 27, 1900 



An Ordinance prohibiting heavy teaming and trucking upon 
the speedway portion of the pawtucket boulevard. 

Be it ordained, etc., as follows: 

Section I. The driving or drawing of heavy wagons, carts, trucks or 
similar vehicles used for the purposes of transportation of stone, lumber, 
coal, ice, express packages, groceries, or other merchandise requiring for 
the transportation of the same a vehicle exceeding in weight a family 
carriage, buggy, carry-all or similar vehicle used principally for pleasure 
driving or recreation, is hereby prohibited upon that portion of Pawtucket 
Boulevard commonly called the Speedway ; provided, however, that this 
prohibition shall not apply to any vehicle used for the purpose of trans- 
porting any article or material necessary for the improvement or repair 
of said speedway, or of any portion of said boulevard, or of the structures 
connected with the water plant in said boulevard. 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER 87 



Sect. 2. Any person who shall violate any provision of Section 1 of 
this ordinance shall be punished by a fine not exceeding twenty dollars 
for each offense. [Approved July 31, 1900. 



An Ordinance providing for the printing of the union labei, 
on all printing for the city of lowell. 

Be it ordained, etc., as follows : 

Section. 2. That all printed matter for the City of Lowell shall here- 
after bear the imprint of the Union Label of the Allied Printing Trades 
Council of Lowell, Mass. 



Sect. 2. That in calling for bids for city printing hereafter, the Chief 
of the Department of Supplies shall make stipulation in accordance with 
Section 1 of this ordinance. 



Sect. 3. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. [Approved 
December 15, 1900. 



An Ordinance establishiug the office of clerk of com- 
mittees. 

Be it ordained, etc., as follows : 

Section r. There shall be a Clerk of Committees, to be chosen by 
concurrent vote of both branches of the City Council as soon as> may be 
after the enactment of this ordinance, who shall enter upon the duties of 
his office immediately after his election, and hold the same for a period 
of three years from and after January 1, 1901, and until his successor is 
elected and qualified. Thereafter the City Council shall, in the month of 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER 



January following the expiration of each three-year term, choose a Clerk 
of Committees who shall hold office for three years. Such Clerk of 
Committees shall receive such compensation as the City Council shall 
determine. 



Sect. 2. He shall make a proper record in books kept for the pur- 
pose, of all proceedings and transactions, and keep a calendar of all 
meetings of the committees of which he is clerk. He shall perform such 
other duties and services, in making estimates and computations, drawing 
orders and reports, and rendering assistance, as such committees shall 
require. 



Sect. On the request of the Chairman of any committee, the said 
Clerk of Committees shall authorize the City Messenger to notify all 
committee members of the time and place of meeting. 



Sect. 4. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. [Passed 
December 18, 1900. 



An Ordinance relating to advertising biels and posters. 



Be it ordained, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. No person, firm or corporation shall distribute or cause to 
be distributed in or upon any street, way, common, or place within the 
limits of the City of Lowell, or post or cause to be posted on any bill- 
board, fence, wall or structure, or shown in windows, any card, circular, 
bill lithograph, or advertisement, whatsoever, containing any cut photo- 
graph, painting or pictorial representation of any kind, for the purpose 
of advertising or calling attention to any show, circus, play or exhibition, 
whether given, or to be given, within or without the City of Lowell, 
without having first submitted the same to the Supt. of Police and 
obtaining his approval thereof, and of such distributing or posting. 
And no such card aforesaid, bill or advertisement shall be distributed or 
posted, as aforesaid, without having attached thereto or printed or pasted 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER 89 

thereon, a statement that it has been approved by the Supt. of Police of 
Lowell, and the date of such approval. 



Sect. 2. Whoever violates the provisions of this ordinance, shall, on 
conviction thereof, be punished by a fine not exceeding twenty dollars 
for each offence. 



Sept. 3. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. [Approv- 
ed December 27, 1901. 

(Amended ordinance 1902.) 



An Ordinance amending an ordinance entitled "an ordinance 
relating to the construction of buildings." 

Be it ordained, etc., as follows : 

That an ordinance entitled, " Relating to the construction and repair 
of buildings, " be and the same is hereby amended by striking out the 
third section thereof and inserting in place thereof the following 
sections : 



Sect. 3. Any person who shall violate any provisions of Section 1 of 
this ordinance shall be punished by a fine not exceeding twenty dollars 
($20.00) for each offence. 



Sect. 4. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. [Approv- 
ed December 27, 1901. 



90 MUNICIPAL REGISTER 

An Ordinance relating to the Approval of bills and claims 
payable from the appropriations for incidentals. 

Be it ordained, etc., as follows : 

Section i. Every bill and claim against the city which, if correct, 
would be chargable to the Appropriation for Incidentals, shall, before 
being passed by the Committee on Accounts, be submitted to the Mayor, 
who shall examine the same and endorse thereon a statement that he does 
or does not object to the payment of the same or of any of the items 
thereof. He shall then return such bill or claim to the City Auditor or 
the Committee on Accounts, and if he objects to the payment of said bill 
or claim, in whole or in part, he shall submit to said Auditor or to said 
committee with said bill when so returned, a specific statement in writing 
signed by him of his objections thereto and his reasons for such objection. 
[Approved December 27, 1901. 



An Ordinance relating to shade trees on the public streets 
of the city of lowell- 

Be it ordained, etc., as follows : 

First. That no person or corporation shall be allowed to remove any 
shade trees on the streets of the City of Lowell without first filing a peti- 
tion requesting authority for the removal of the same from the City 
Council of said City. 



Second. All petitions for the removal of shade trees on the streets of 
Lowell thall be referred to the Aldermanic members of the Committee on 
Streets of the City of Lowell. 



Third. That the Aldermanic members of the Committee on Streets 
shall constitute and be known as the Committee on Shade Trees. 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER 91 

Fourth. That on the presentation of a petition for the removal of a 
shade tree as aforesaid and after its reference to the Committee on Shade 
Trees, they shall cause a notice to be posted on the tree by the Superin- 
tendent of Streets or by some person authorized by him, said notice to set 
forth that a petition for the removal of the tree upon which the notice 
has been posted has been filed ; said notice shall also give the time and 
place where all persons interested can be heard at a public hearing by 
said committee. The above notice shall be posted on the tree at least 
seven days before the time set for the hearing. 



Fifth. That the Superintendent of Streets or the Committee on 
Shade Trees shall not authorize the removal of any shade tree in the City 
of Lowell except in accordance with the preceding sections. In case 
where the Superintendent of Streets or the Committe on Shade Trees are 
satisfied that public necessity by reason of danger to life and property 
requires the immediate removal of a shade tree, the Superintendent or 
said Committe may authorize such removal without complying with the 
conditions named in the preceding sections. 



Sixth. Any person or corporation violating this ordinance or any 
provisions of the same, shall be punished for each offence by a fine not 
exceeding twenty dollars. 



Seventh. All ordinances and parts of ordinances inconsistent here- 
with are hereby repealed. [Approved December 27, 1901. 



An Ordinance amending an ordinance entiled " relating to 
advertising bills and posters. 

Be it ordained, etc., as follows : 

That the Ordinance entitled " Relating to advertising bills and 
posters," passed by the City Council and approved by the Mayor 
December 27, 1901, be and is hereby amended by striking out all after the 
enacting clause and inserting in place thereof, the following : — 



92 MUNICIPAL REGISTER 

Section i. No person, firm or corporation shall distribute, or cause 
to be distributed in or upon any street, way, common or place within the 
limits of the City of Lowell, or post or cause to be posted on any bill- 
board, fence, wall, or structure, or shown in windows, any card, photo- 
graph, painting or pictorial representation of any kind for the purpose 
of advertising or calling attention to any burlesque show, whether given 
or to be given within or without the limits of the City of Lowell ; nor 
shall any person, firm or corporation distribute or cause to be distributed 
within the limits of the City of Lowell any pamphlet or circular contain- 
ing advertisements therein or aphrodisiac cures, without having first sub- 
mitted the same to the Superintendent of Police and obtaining his 
approval of such posting and distributing. And no such card, bill, 
pamphlet, circular or advertisement aforesaid shall be posted or dis- 
tributed without having attached thereto, or printed or pasted thereon, a 
statement that it has been approved by the Superintendent of Police of 
the City of Lowell, and the date of such approval. 

Sect. 2. No person, firm or corporation shall throw, deposit, drop 
or leave, nor cause to be thrown, deposited, dropped or left in the high- 
way or upon the doorsteps or within the hallway of any dwelling house 
within the limits of the City of Lowell, any sample of medicinal or toxic 
substance, either in package or bulk and shall leave such sample of 
medicinal or toxic substance in a dwelling house only with the consent 
and approval and in the possession of an adult occupant. 



Sect. 3. Whoever violates the provisions of this Ordinance shall, 
on conviction thereof, be punished by a fine not exceeding twenty dollars 
for each offence. 



Sect. 4. This Ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. [Ap- 
proved 1902. 



An Ordinance regulating the operation of motor cycles in 
the city oe lowell. 

Be it ordained, etc-, as follows : 

Section 1. No motor cycle shall be ridden upon the streets, avenues 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER 93 

boulevard, parks or commons of the City of Lowell, unless the motor of 
such cycle shall be fully covered and provided with mufflers designed 
expressly to deaden the noise of a motor cycle. 



Sect. 2. Any person who violates the provisions of the preceding 
section, shall be punished by a fine not exceeding ten dollars for each 
offence. 



Sect. 3. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. [Ap- 
proved 1902. 



An Ordinance officially designating city institution buildings 
in chelmsford street as the lowell city hospital and 
almshouse. 

Be it ordained, etc., a% follows : 

That the City Institution buildings located in Chelmsford Street be 
designated and hereafter known as The Lowell City Hospital and Alms- 
house. 

This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. [Approved April 
10, 1903. 



An Ordinance amending sections 12 and 16 of chapter 39 of the 
revised ordinances. 

Be it ordained, etc., as follows: 

That Section 12 of Chapter 39 of the Revised Ordinances be amend- 
ed by striking out the words " board of aldermen " in the fifth and sixth 



94 MUNICIPAL REGISTER 

lines of said section, and inserting instead thereof the words " Superin- 
tendent of Streets ; " and that Section 16 of said chapter be amended by 
striking out the words "Superintendent of Streets," and by striking out 
the word '"they" in the fourth line and inserting instead thereof the 
words " board of aldermen ; " so that said sections shall read as follows : 



Sect. 12. No person shall break or dig up the ground in any street, 
townway, highway, or common and public passageway, in the city, nor 
erect any staging for building thereon, or pile or deposit thereon any 
earth, bricks, lumber or other building material, without a written license 
from the Superintendent of Streets, and without faithfully complying 
with the conditions of such license. 



Sect. 16. In all cases in which license may be given by the Superin- 
tendent of Streets to obstruct any highway, street, townway, or passage- 
way as described in the twelfth section of this chapter, the Board of 
Aldermen may impose such reasonable conditions and limitations with 
regard to the erection of barricades, the maintaining of lights and the 
taking of other precautions for the security of travellers and passengers 
as they shall consider necessary. 



This Ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. [ Approve;} Octo- 
ber 9, 1903. 



An Ordinance authorizing the superintendent of police to 
partition off streets, ways or sidewalks for the protec- 
tion of the public. 

Be it ordained, etc., as follows : 

Section 1. For the protection and safety of the public, the Superin- 
tendent of Police is authorized to partition off with rope, wire or other 
material, any portion or portions of any street, way or sidewalk within 
the limits of the City of Lowell on the occasion of any public observance, 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER 95 

celebration or procession, or upon any other occasion when, in the opin- 
ion of the said Superintendent of Police, it becomes necessary. 



Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. [Approv- 
ed October 9, 1903. 



Population, Legal Voters, Etc., by Wards. 













REGISTERED VOTERS 


































Vo 


TBS FOR 




Dec. 1903 


Nov. 1904. 


Dec 


. 1904 


MAYOR 








City 


Election 


State 


Election 


City 


Election 




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498 


18 


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474 


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506 


174 


249 


2 


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2 


441 


16 


457 


452 


14 


46 


6 471 


M 


485 


208 


207 


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8 248 


3 


370 


8 


378 


363 


6 


3 6 


9 367 


6 


373 


174 


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1.309 


42 


I35 1 


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37 


x 3 2 


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37 


1364 


556 


613 


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272 


8 


280 


317 


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8 


338 


182 


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378 


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392 


360 


11 


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1 366 


11 


377 


280 


55 


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10 281 


3 


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6 


496 


449 


6 


45 


5 466 


6 


472 


355 


57 


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1 140 


28 


1 168 


1126 


25 


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1 1 162 


25 


1187 


817 


207 


6 


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537 


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638 


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675 


696 


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6 702 


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712 


117 


466 


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1883 


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188 


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1903 


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486 


473 


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957 


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1 


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740 


68 


808 


740 


65 


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5 743 


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171 


478 


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580 


17 


525 


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8 523 


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252 


215 


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626 


20 


646 


658 


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368 


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105 


1979 


1909 


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200 


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791 


902 


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666 


11 


677 


666 


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274 


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784 


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15 



94 969 



I573 6 589 16325 15S00 534 16334 16076 535 16611 7306 6733 108 



POPULATION OF THE CITY OF LOWELL. 



Year 


Population 


Year 


Population 


Year 


Population 


Year 


Population 


1828 


3.532 


1840 


20,981 


1865 


30,990 


1890 


77,696 


1830 


6,477 


1844 


25, i^3 


1866 


36,878 


1895 


84,359 


1832 


10,254 


1846 


29,127 


1870 


40,928 


1900 


94,969 


1833 


l-Zf&l 


1850 


33,383 


1875 


49,688 




* 


1836 
1837 


17,633 
18,010 


1855, 
• i860 


37,554 
36,827 , 


1880 


59.485 
64,107 






1885 







Population estimated for 1904 by the State Board of Health, 104,402. 



CITY OFFICERS 



WHEN ELECTED OR APPOINTED. 



"All officers elected or appointed by the City Council, or. either 
branch thereof, shall hold their offices according to the tenure of the 
same and until their successors are chosen aud qualified, unless other- 
wise provided for. 

AGENT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 

Appointed by the Board of Health under civil service rules. 

ASSESSORS OF TAXES.— Three. 

One chosen in the month of January or February by concurrent 
vote of the City Council for the term of three years. Ordinances, 
Chapter 3, Section 1. 

ASSISTANT ASSESSORS.— Six. 

Appointed by the Mayor in March or April, for May and June, sub- 
ject to confirmation by the City Council. Ordinance approved Feb- 
28, 1899. 

ASSISTANT ENGINEERS OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT.— Four. 
Appointed by the Mayor and Aldermen in March or April, the first 
assistant for a term of three years, the others for one year commenc- 
ing May first. Ordinance approved November 27, 1896. 

AUDITOR OF ACCOUNTS. 

Chosen by concurrent vote of the City Council in January or Febru- 
ary, for one year, commencing the first Monday in April. Ordinan- 
ces, Chapter 2, Section 1. 

ASSISTANT CITY CLERK. 

Appointed by the City Clerk, subject to confirmation by the Board of 
Aldermen. Ordinances, Chapter 8, Section 2. 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER 99 

BOARD OF EXAMINERS OF PLUMBERS.— Three. 

One member appointed by the Board of Health for the term of one 
year, commencing May first. The chairman of the Board of Health 
and the Superintendent of Public Buildings are members of the 
Board, ex-ofncio. Ordinances, Chapter 28, Section 6. 

BOARD OF HEALTH.— Three. 

One member appointed by the mayor and Aldermen in January for 
the term of three years, commencing the first Monday in February. 

Revised Laws, Chapter 75, Section 9. 

BOARD OF PARK COMMISSIONERS.— Five. 

One member appointed annually by the Mayor with the approval of 
the City Council for a term of five years from first Monday in May. 
Revised Laws, Chapter 28. 

BOARD OF POLICE.— Three. 

One member appointed by the Mayor every two years for the term of 
six years, commencing the first Monday in June. Chapter 428, Acts 
of 1894. Chapter 187, Acts of 1895. 

CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

Chosen by the Board of Aldermen on the first Monday in January, or 
as soon thereafter as may be. City Charter, Section 12. 

CHIEF ENGINEER OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Chosen by concurrent vote of the City Council in March or April for 
the term of three years, commencing May first. Chapter 95, Section 
2, Acts of 1897. Ordinance approved November 27, 1896. 

CITY CLERK. 

Chosen annually by the City Council in convention, as soon after 
organization as convenient. City Charter, Section 17. 

CITY MESSENGER. / 

Chosen by concurrent vote of the City Council in January for the 
term of one year, commencing the first Monday in February. Ordi- 
nances, Chapter 10, Section 1. 



TOO MUNICIPAL REGISTER 

CITY PHYSICIAN. 

Chosen annually in March or April by concurrent vote of the City 
Council for one year, commencing May first. Ordinances, 1900. 

* 

CITY SOLICITOR. 
* 
Chosen by concurrent vote of the City Council in January or Febru- 
ary for the term of one year, commencing March first. Ordinances, 
Chapter 11, Section 1. 

CITY TREASURER AND COLLECTOR OF TAXES. 

Chosen annually by the City Council in convention as soon after 
organization as convenient, for the term of one year commencing 
April first. City Charter, Section 17. Ordinances, Chapter 9, Sect- 
ion 1. 

CIVIL ENGINEER FOR THE CITY. 

Chosen by concurrent vote of the City Council in January or Febru- 
ary for a term of one year, commencing April first. Ordinances, 
Chapter 13, Section 1. 

CIVIL SERVICE EXAMINERS.— Three. 

Appointed by the State Civil Service Commissioners. 

CLERK OF COMMITTEES. 

Chosen by concurrent vote of the City Council in January, for three 
years. Ordinances, 1900. 

CLERK OF THE COMMON COUNCIL. 

Chosen by the Common Council on the first Monday in January, or 
as soon thereafter as may be. City Charter, Section 14. 

CLERKS EMPLOYED IN DEPARTMENTS. 

Appointed by heads of departments under civil service rules. Chap- 
ter 415, Section 5, Acts of 1896. 

CLERK OF WATER BOARD. 

Chosen by the Water Board in June for the term of one year. Ordi- 
nances, Chapter 45, Section 2. 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER IOI 

COMMISSIONERS OF SINKING FUNDS.— Three. 

One chosen in December by concurrent vote of the City Council for 
the term of three years, commencing January first. Revised Laws, 
Chapter 27, Section 14. 

COMMITTEE ON ACCOUNTS.— Three. 

On the first Monday in January, or as soon thereafter as may be, one 
member chosen by the Board of Aldermen from that Board, and two 
members of the Common Council by said Council. Chapter 415, 
Section 10, Acts of 1896. 

COMMITTEE ON FINANCE.— Five. 

On the first Monday in January, or as soon thereafter as may be, one 
member of the Board of Aldermen, to be elected by that Board, and 

three members of the Common Council, to be elected by said Coun- 
cil. The Mayor is a member ex-officio. Ordinances, Chapter 1, Sec- 
tion 2. 

CONSTABLES.— Four or more. 

Appointed by the Mayor and Aldermen in January or February for 
the term of one year. City Charter, Section 19, Ordinances, Chapter 
41, Section 2. 

ELECTION OFFICERS. 

Appointed by the Mayor and Aldermen in August, for the term of 
one year, commencing September fifteenth. Chapter 386, Acts of 
1905- 

FENCE VIEWERS.— Three. 

Nominated by the Mayor in January or February and chosen by con- 
current vote, commencing in the Board of Aldermen, for the term of 
one year. Ordinances, Chapter 41, Section 1. 

FIELD DRIVERS.— Four or more. 

Nominated by the Mayor in January or February and chosen by con- 
current vote of the City Council, commencing in the Board of Alder- 
men, for the term of one year. Ordinances, Chapter 41, Section 1. 



102 MUNICIPAL REGISTER 

FIREMEN. 

Appointed by the Chief Engineer on recommendation of the Board 
of Assistant Engineers, under civil service rules. Chapter 178, Acts 
of 1898. 

FISH WARDEN. 

Appointed by the Mayor and Aldermen in January or February for 
the term of one year. Revised Laws, Chapter 91, Section 54. 

HEALTH COMMISSIONER. 

Nominated by the Mayor in January or February and chosen by con- 
current vote of the City Council for the term of one year. Ordinan- 
ces, Chapter 41, Section 1. 

INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS. 

Appointed by the Mayor and Aldermen in March, subject to the ap- 
proval of the State Board of Cattle Commissioners, for the term of 
one year, commencing April first. 

INSPECTOR OF BALE OR BUNDLE HAY. 

Appointed by the Board of Aldermen in January or February for the 
term of one year. Ordinances, Chapter 21,, Section 1. 

INSPECTOR OF BOILERS. 

Appointed by the Mayor and Aldermen in January or February for the 
term of one year. Revised Laws, Chapter 105, Section 7. 

INSPECTORS OF THE HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 

Appointed by the Eoard of Health under civil service rules. 

INSPECTORS OF PETROLEUM OILS. 

Appointed by the Mayor and Aldermen, upon request of five or more 
citizens. Revised Laws, Chapter 102, Section 109. 

INSPECTOR OF MILK, VINEGAR AND OLEOMARGARINE. 

Appointed by the Mayor and Aldermen in January or February for 
the term of one year. Ordinances, Chapter 41, Section 2. 



* 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER 103 

INSPECTORS OF PLUMBING. 

Appointed by the Board of Health. Ordinances, Chapter 28, Sect- 

tion 8. 

INSPECTOR OF PROVISIONS. 

Appointed by the Board of Aldermen. 

INSPECTORS WATER DEPARTMENT. 

Appointed by Water Board under civil service rules. 

INSPECTOR OF WIRES. 

Appointed by the Mayor and Aldermen in January for the term of 
three years, commencing February first. Ordinances, 1898. 

LIBRARIAN OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 

Chosen by the Trustees of the City Library. Chapter 231, Section 5, 
Acts of 1888. 

MAYOR'S CLERK. 

Appointed by the Mayor. Chapter 415, Section 4, Acts of 1896. 

MEASURERS OF GRAIN.— Two or more. 

Appointed by the Mayor and Aldermen in January or February for 
the term of one year. Ordinances, Chapter 41, Section 2. 

MEASURERS OF UPPER LEATHER.— Two or more. 

Appointed by the Mayor and Aldermen in April, for the term of one 
year. — Ordinances, Chapter 41, Section 2. 

MEASURERS OF WOOD AND BARK.— Two or more. 

Appointed by the Mayor and Aldermen in January or February for 
the term of one year. Ordinances, Chapter 46, Section 2. 

MEASURERS OF WOOD AND BARK BROUGHT BY WATER OR 
RAILROAD CARS INTO THE CITY.— Two or more. 
Appointed by the Mayor and Aldermen in January or February for 
the term of one year. Ordinances, Chapter 46, Section 1. 

POLICE OFFICERS. 

Appointed by the Board of police under civil service rules. 



104 MUNICIPAL REGISTER 

POUND KEEPER. 

Nominated by the Mayor in January or February and chosen by con- 
current vote of the City Council, commencing in the Board of Alder- 
men, for the term of one year. Ordinances, Chapter 41, Section 1. 

PRESIDENT OF THE COMMON COUNCIL. 

Chosen by the Common Council on the first Monday in January, or 
as soon thereafter as may be. City Charter, Section 14 

REGISTRARS OF VOTERS.— Three and the City Clerk. 

One member appointed by the Mayor and Aldermen in March or 
April for the term of three years, commencing May first. The City 
Clerk is a member ex-officio. Revised Laws, Chapter n, Section 25. 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. 

Appointed by the Mayor and Aldermen in January or February for 
the term of one year. Ordinances, Chapter 41, Section 2. 

SECRETARY OF THE OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 
Appointed by the Overseers of the Poor. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF THE CITY FARM. 
Appointed by the Overseers of the Poor. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF THE CITY SCALES. 

Appointed by the Mayor and Aldermen in January or February for 
the term of one year. Ordinances, Chapter 21, Section 1. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF COMMONS. 

Appointed by Board of Park Commissioners. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 

Chosen by concurrent vote of the City Council in January or Febru- 
ary for the term of one year. Ordinances, Chapter 5, Section 1. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 

Chosen by the School Committee in July or August for the term of 
one year. Ordinances, Chapter 40, Section 1. 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER IO5 

SUPERINTENDENT OF STATE AID AND ASSISTANT. 

Appointed by the Mayor and Aldermen in January for the term of 
one year, commencing February first. Ordinances approved Sep- 
tember 27, 1898. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS. 

Chosen by concurrent vote of the City Council in January or Febru- 
ary for the term of one year. Ordinances, Chapter 39, Section 1. 

-SUPERINTENDENT OF WATER WORKS. 

Chosen by the Water Board in March for the term of one year, com- 
mencing April first. Ordinances, Chapter 45, Section 2. 

SURVEYORS OF HIGHWAYS. 

Chosen by concurrent vote of the City Council in January or Febru- 
ary for the term of one year. City Charter, Section 17, Ordinances, 
Chapter 39, Section 1. 

SURVEYORS OF LUMBER.— Four or more. 

Nominated by the Mayor in January or February and chosen by con- 
cnrrent vote of the City Council, commencing in the Board of Alder- 
men, for the term of one year. Ordinances, Chapter 39, Section 1. 

SURVEYORS OF PLASTERING, BRICK OR STONE WORK AND 
PAINTING.— Four or more. 
Appointed by the Mayor and Aldermen in January or February for 
the term of one year. Ordinances, Chapter 41, Section 2. 

TRUANT COMMISSIONERS. 

Appointed by the School Committee. Revised Laws, Chapter 46, 
Section 12. 

TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY.— Five and the Mayor. 

One member appointed in December by the Mayor and Aldermen for 
the term of five years, commencing the second Monday in January. 
The Mayor is a member ex-officio. Ordinances, Chapter 14, Section 2. 



106 MUNICIPAL REGISTER 

TRUSTEES OF PUBLIC BURIAL GROUNDS.— Two and the Mayor. 
One member appointed by the Mayor and Aldermen in December for 
the term of two years, commencing the first Monday in January. 
The Mayor is a member ex-officio. Chapter 337, Section 2, Acts of 
1891. 

WATER BOARD.— Four. 

One member chosen in January or February by concurrent vote of 
the City Council for the term of four years commencing the second 
Monday in March. Ordinances, Chapter 4.5, Section 1. 

WEIGHERS OF COAL.— One or more. 

Appointed by the Mayor and Aldermen in January or February for 
the term of one year. Ordinances, Chapter 41, Section 2. 

WEIGHERS OF HAY AND OTHER ARTICLES.— Two or more. 

Appointed by the Mayor and Aldermen in January or February for 
the term of one year. Ordinances, Chapter 21, Section 1. 



CATALOGUE 



OF THE 



Government of the City of Lowell 



IN 



Chronological Order of Service* 



From Its Institution in 1836, to 1904, Inclusive. 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER IO9 

1836. 



MAYOR : 

ELISHA BARTLETT. 

ALDERMEN : 

William Austin, resigned Oct. 10. Benjamin Walker. 

Joseph Tapley, elected November. Oliver M. Whipple. 

Seth Ames. Alexander Wright. 

Aaron Mansur. 

Samuel A. Coburn, City Clerk. 



COMMON COUNCIL: 

John Clark, President. Stephen Mansur. 

Henry J. Baxter. John Mixer. 

Jonathan Bowers. Thomas Nesmith. 

George Brownell. David Nourse. 

James Cook. Thomas Ordway. 

David Dana. James Russell. 

Erastus Douglass. John A. Savels. 

Josiah B. French. Sidney Spalding. 

Cyril French. Weld Spalding. 

Samuel Garland Jonathan Tyler. 

Horatio W. Hastings. Tappan Wentwortb. 

Horace Howard. William Wyman. 

George Woodward, Clerk, died. Albert Locke, elected. 



183 7. 

MAYOR : 

ELISHA BARTLETT, t '36. 
ALDERMEN: 

Seth Ames, *'36. Joseph G. Kittredge. 

John Aiken. Joshua Swan. 

Seth Chellis Alexander Wright, *'36. 

Samuel A. Coburn, City Clerk. 



COMMON COUNCIL: 

Ward 1. Ward 4. 

Joshua Abbott. William Baker. % 

James K. Fellows. Elijha M. Read. 

Jesse Phelps. Charles H. Wilder. 

Walter Wright. William W. Wyman. 

Ward 2. Ward 5. 

William Fiske. George Brownell, '36. 

Thomas Nesmith, '36. Osgood Dane. 

Josiah Osgood. James Russell, '36. 

Joseph Tyler. Tappan Wentwortb, '36. 

Ward 3. Ward 6. 

Joseph M. Dodge. Andrew Bird. 

Elisha Huntington, President. Benjamin H. Gage. 

William North. Jona. T. P. Hunt. 

Joseph Tapley. Abram Tilton. 

Albert Locke, Clerk. 

The figuies without other marks indicate membership of the Common Council those 
years, f Mayor that year. * Alderman that year. % President of the Common Council 
that year. 



no 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER 
1838 



Benjamin F. French. 
Charles L. Tilden. 
Oliver M. Whipble, *'36. 



MAYOR: 

LUTHER LAWRENCE. 
ALDERMEN: 

George H. Carleton. 
George Brownell, '36, '37. 
Seth Chellis, *'37. 

Thomas Ordway, City Clerk. 



COMMON COUNCIL 



Ward 1. 

Jesse Phelps, '37. 
Walter Wright, '37. 
Eliphalet Brown. 
Perez Fuller. 

Ward 2. 

William Fiske, '37. 
Aaron H. Sherman. 
William Upham. 
Henry J. Baxter, '36. 

Ward 3. 

Thomas Hopkinson. 

Elisha Huntington, t'37, President. 

Horace Howard, '36. 

John Mixer, '36. 



Ward 4. 



David Dana, '36. 
Perlev Hale. 
Benjamin Walker, *'36. 
William Baker, 37. 

Ward f>, 
. Garret J. Bradt. 
Benjamin AVilde. 
Erastus Douglass, '36. / 
Rufus Paul. 

Ward 6. 
Eli Cooper. 
Thomas L. Randlett. 
James L. Foot. 
Calvin Goodspeed. 

Albert Locke, Clerk. 



18 3 9. 



MAYOR : ' 
T A TTHER LAWRENCE. -[Died in April.] 
ELISHA HUNTINGTON, } '37, \ '38. 

ALDERMEN: 

Benjamin F. French, *'38. George H. Carleton, *'38. 



John 0. Green. 
Charles L. Tilden, *'38. 



John Clark, J '36. 

Oliver M. Whipple, * 36, *'38. 



Thomas Ordway, City Clerk. 



Ward 1. 

Walter Wright, '37, '38. 
Harlin Pillsbury. 
Eliphalet Brown, '38. 
Forrest Eaton. 

Ward 2. 

Jonathan Tvler, '36. 
John Nesmith. 
Henry J. Baxter, '36, '38. 
Jefferson Bancroft. 

Ward 3. 

Thomas Hopkinson, '38, President. 
Jacob Robbing. 
John G. Locke. 



COMMON COUNCIL : 

Ward 4. 
Benjamin Walker, *'36, '38. 
Samuel Horn. 
Stephen Carleton. 
Stephen Mansur, '36. 

Ward 5. 
Tappan Wentworth, '36, '37. 
Lewis Mclntire, died Feb., 1840. 
Benjamin Wilde, '38. 
Garret J. Bradt, '38. 

Ward 6. 
Thomas L. Randlett, '38. 
Joseph S. Holt. 
John L. Fitts. 
Daniel Knapp. 

Albert Locke, Clerk. 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER 
18 40. 



in 



MAYOR : 

ELISHA HUNTINGTON, J '37, J '38, t '39. 
ALDERMEN : 



Jonathan Tyler, '36, '39. 
John R. Adams. 
Joseph Bedlow. 



Harlin Pillsbury, '39. 
Seth Ames, *'36, *'37. 
Stephen Mansur, '36, '39. 



Thomas Oedway, City Clerk. 



COMMON COUNCIL: 



Ward 1. 
Forrest Eaton, '39. 
Sylvanus Adams. 
Henry Patch. 
R. M. Hutchinson. 

Ward 2. 
Jefferson Bancroft, '39. 
John Nesmith, '39. 
Joseph G. Kittredge, *'37. 
Josiah Osgood, '37. 

Ward 3. 
Pelham W. Warren, President. 
Abner W. Buttrick. 
Asa Hall. 
Samuel Burbank. 

Albekt Locke, Clerk, cued October. 



Ward 4. 
Ferdinand Rodliff . 
Ethan Burnap. 
Edward F. Watson. 
B. Walker, *'36, '38, '39, died Sept. 

Ward 5. 

Tappan Wentworth, '36, '37, '39. 
Samuel W. Brown. 
John J. Crane. 
George Dane. 

Ward 6. 
Daniel Knapp, '39. 
George L. Fitts, '39. 
Joseph Battles. 
Joshua Converse. 

John G. Locke, elected October. 



184 1. 



MAYOR: 

ELISHA HUNTINGTON, J '37, J '38, f '39, t '40. 

j 
ALDERMEN : 

Seth Chellis, *'37, '38. George H. Carleton, *'38, *'39. 

Jefferson Bancroft, '39, '40. John R. Adams, *'40. 

Cyril French, '36. John Aiken, *'37. 

Thomas Oedway, City Clerk. 



Ward 1. 
Henry Patch, '40. 
George Bragdon. 
John W. Holland. 
Arnold Welch. 

Ward 2. 

William Fiske, '37, '38. 
Erasmus D. Leavitt. 
Jonathan White. 
Nathaniel Wilson. 

' Ward 3. 
Samuel Burbank, '40. 
Nathaniel Critchett. 
Royal South wick. 
Edward Winslow. 



COMMON COUNCIL: 

Ward 4. 
Ethan Burnap, '40. 
William Livingston. 
John Morrison. 
Edward F. Watson, '40, 

Ward 5. 

Tappan Wentworth, '36, '37, '39, '40, Pres. 
Samuel W. Brown, '40. 
John J. Crane, '40. 
Phineas Whiting. 

Ward 6. 

Francis H. Bowers. 
Isaac H. Cooper. 
William Potter. 
John Smith. 

John G. Locke, Clerk. 



112 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER 
1842. 



MAYOR : 

NATHANIEL WRIGHT. 



ALDERMEN: 

Nathaniel Thurston. 

Jefferson Bancroft, '39, '40, '41. 

Cyril French, '36, *'41. 

Thomas Obdway, City Clerk 



William Livingston, '41 . 
Ithamar A. Beard. 
John W. Graves. 



Ward 1. 
Jeremiah P. Jewett. 
John Hadley. 
James Townsend. 
Edward J. Payne. 

Ward 2 
John Nesmith, '39, '40. 
Erasmus D. Leavit, '41. 
Joseph W. Mansur, President. 
James Hopkins. 

Ward 3. 

Nathaniel Critchett, '41. 

Ira Spalding. 

John Mead. 

Asa W. Willoughby. 



COMMON COUNCIL: 

Ward 4. 
John Morrisou, '41. 
William Carlton. 
Oliver March. 
Josiah B. French, '36. 

Ward 5. 

James Patterson. 
Isaac Appleton. 
Josiah Seave} 7 . 
Roswell Douglass. 

Ward 6. 

James Russell, '36, '37. 
Jonathan Kendall. 
Varnum A. Shed. 
Isaac N. Fitts. 



John Gr. Locke, Clerk. 



1843. 



MAYOR : 

NATHANIEL WRIGHT, t '42. 

ALDERMEN: 

Harlin Pillsbury, '39, *'40, res'd June. S. Spalding, '36, res'd in June. 

Henrv C. Johnson. Joseph Griffin. 

Cyril' French, '36 *'41, *'42. Charles L. Tilden, *'38, '39. 

Thomas Obdway, City Clerk. 



COMMON COUNCIL: 



Ward 1. 

Daniel Bixby. 
Edward J. Payne, '42. 
Hugh Commiskev. 
Walter Wright, '37, '38, '39. 

Ward 2. 
Henry J. Baxter, '36, '38, '39. 
John P. Simonds. 
Pliny Lawton. 
Ben Osgood. 

Ward 3. 
John Mead, '42. 
Wlllard Brown. 
Ira Spalding, '42. 
Benjamin J. Gerrish. 



Ward 4. 



Otis Allen. 

Alfred Gilman. 

Oliver March, '42, President. 

William Carlton, '42. 

Ward 5. 

James Patterson, '42. 
David Bradt. 
John L. Tripp. 
Benjamin F. Holden. 

Ward 6. 

John B. McAlvin. 
Cyrus Battles. 
Sewall G. Mack. 
Charles F. Mitchell. 



John G. Locke, Clerk. 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER 
1844. 



113 



MAYOR: 

ELISHA HUNTINGTON, { '37, \ '38, f '39, t '40, f '41. 
ALDERMEN : 

Henry Smith. 

Selwin Bancroft, 

0. M. Whipple, *'36, *'38, *'39. 

Thomas Ordway, City Clerk. 



Edward F. Watson, '40, '41. 
Joseph Griffin, *'43. 
John Wright. 



Ward 1. 

Forrest Eaton, '39, '40. 
Gilman N. Nichols. 
Hugh Cummiskey, '43. 
David Healey. 

Ward 2. 

John P. Simonds, '43. 
Ben Osgood, '43. 
Amos Merriam. 

John Clark, J '36, *'39, President. 
Ward 3. 

Charles B. Coburn. 
George Choate. 
Isaac Scripture. 
William C. Gray. 



COMMON COUNCIL: 

Ward 4. 

Asa Wetherbee. 
Abner W. Buttrick, '40. 
Horatio G. F. Corliss. 
Charles H. Wilder, '37. 
Ward 5. 

John L. Tripp, '43. 
David Bradt, '43. 
John Wright. 
Nathaniel Wright, Jr. 

Ward 6. 

Sewall G. Mack, '43. 
James Russell, '36, '37, '42. 
Jonathan Kendall, 42. 
Gilman Gale. 

John G. Locke, Clerk. 



18 45. 



MAYOR: 

ELISHA HUNTINGTON, J '37, J '38, f '39, t '40, f '41, f '44. 

ALDERMEN : 

Henry Smith, *'44. Edward F. Watson, '40, '41, '44. 

Selwin Bancroft, *'44. John C. Dalton. 

O. M. Whipple, **36, *'38, *'39, *'44. Daniel Knapp, '39. 

Thomas Ordway, City Clerk. 



Ward 1. 

Gilman N. Nichols, '39. 
Danforth P. Brigham. 
Jonathan Adams. 
Willard C. Welch. 



Ward 2. 

John P. Simonds, '43, '44. 

Daniel Balch. 

William Brown. 

Daniel S. Richardson, President. 

Ward 3. 

Isaac Scripture, '44. 
William C. Gray, '44. 
George Choate, '44. 
Hapgood Wright. 



COMMON COUNCIL: 

Ward 4. 
Abner, W. Buttrick, '40 '44. 
Asa Wetherbee, '44. 
Charles H. Wilder, '37, '44. 
Josiah Sawtell. 

Ward 5. 
'44. 



John G. 



Nathaniel Wright, Jr., 
Amos Hyde. 
Edward Sherman. 
James Fenno. 

Ward 

Gilman Gale, '44. 
John B. McAlvin, '43. 
Samuel Fay, Jr. 
Lorenzo P. Wright. 

Locke, Clerk. 



ii 4 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER 
1846. 



MAYOR : 

JEFFERSON BANCROFT, 



39, '40, *'41, *'42. 



Henry Smith, *'44, *',45. 
Sehvin Bancroft, *'44, *'45. 
William C. Gray, '44, '45. 
Joseph Butterfield. 



ALDERMEN: 

John C. Dalton, '45. 

D. Knapp, '39, *'45, resigned in July 

Isaac Corper, '41, elected in August. 



Thomas Ordway, City Clerk. 



COMMON COUNCIL 



Ward 1. 
Gilman N. Nichols, '39, '45. 
Danforth P. Brigham, '45. 
Willard C. Welch, '45. 
Thomas S. Hutchinson. 

Ward 2. 

Daniel Balch, '45. 

William Brown, 45 

Daniel S. Richardson, J '45, President. 

Zadock Rogers. 

Ward 3. 

Hapgood W right, '45. 
Isaac Farrington. 
Joel Powers. 
Franklin Mead. 



Ward 4. 



Josiah Sawtell, '45. 
Solon Stevens. 
David J. Moody. 
William Fletcher. 

Ward 5. 

Amos Hyde, '45. 
Horatio G. F. Corliss, '44. 
Jonathan Bowers, '36. 
Charles M. Short. 

Ward 6. 

Lorenzo P. Wright, '45. 
John L. Fitts, '39, '40. 
Lewis Packard. 
Columbus J. Hubbard. 



John G. Locke, Clerk 



18 47 



MAYOE: 

JEFFERSON BANCROFT, '39, '40, * '41, * '42, f '46. 

ALDERMEN: 

George Bragdon. Elisha Huntington, + '37, t '38, f'39, f'4a 

Joseph Butterfield, *'46. t '41, f '44, f '45. 

Linus Child. Sewall G. Mack, '43, '44. 

James Fenno, '45. Stephen Mansur, '36, '39, **40. 

Josiah Sawtell, '45, '46. 

Thomas Ordway, City Clerk. 



COMMON COUNCIL: 



Ward 1. 

William Conihe. 
James C. Crombie. 
David S. Bachelder, 
Jesse Huse. 

Ward 2. 

Samuel W. Brown, '40, '41. 
Hannibal Powers. 
William Newman. 
Otis L. Allen. 

Ward 3. 

Joel Powers, '46. 
Franklin Mead, '46. 
Isaac Farrington, '46. 
Samuel G. Davis. 



Ward 4. 

Joel Adams, President. 
Horatio Fletcher. 
Solon Stevens, '46. 
Stephen A. Coburn. 

Ward 5. 

Ignatius Tyler. 
Edward C. Johnson. 
Elihu Gates. 
Charles M. Short, '46. 

Ward 6. 
Thomas Wentworth. 
Isaac N. Parker. 
John R. Southwick. 
Isaiah Morse. 



John G. Locke, Clerk. 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER 
1848. 



115 



MAYOR: 

JEFFERSON BANCROFT, '39, '40, * '41, *'42, t '46, f '47. 

ALDERMEN: 
David Dana, '36, '38. Gilman N. Nichols, '39, '45, '46. 

Erastus Douglass, '36, '38. Daniel S. Richardson, +'45, % '46. 

Jacob Graves, resigned in June. Josiah Sawtell, '45, '46, *'47. 

William Newman, '47. O. M. Whipple, *'36, *'38, *'39, *'45. 

Thomas Ordavay, City Clerk. 



Ward 1. 

William Conihe, '47. 
James C. Crombie, '47. 
Jesse Huse, '47. 
Gerry Wilson. 

Ward 2. 

Otis L. Allen, '47. 
William H. Fla<™. 
John Nesmith, '39, '40, '42. 
Hannibal Powers, '47. 

Ward 3. 

Alfred Gilman, '43. 
Thomas Hopkinson, '38, '39, 
Ransom Reed. 
Nathaniel Critchett, '41, '42. 



COMMON COUNCIL: 

Ward 4. 

John Avery. 

Otis Allen, '43. 

Abiel Rolfe. 

Horace Howard, '36, '38. 

Ward 5. 

Ignatius Tyler, '47. 
Elihu Gates. '47. 
Edward C. Johnson, '47. 
Charles M. Short, '46, '47. 
Ward 6. 

Thomas Wentworth, '47. 
President. Isaac N. Parker, '47. 

Jeremiah M. Currier. 
Horace Parmenter. 

John G. Locke, Clerk. 



18 49. 



MAYOR : 

JOSIAH B. FRENCH, '36, '42. 



James B. Francis. 

Cyril French, '36, *'41, *'42, *'43. 

James H. B. Ayer. 

Daniel D. Crombie. 



ALDERMEN : 

Daniel Carter. 

George Brownell, '36, '37, *'38. 

Artemas L. Brooks. 

Joseph Bedlow, *'40. 



Thomas Okdway, City Clerk. 



COMMON COUNCIL 



Ward 1. 



Ward 4. 



Jesse Huse, '47, '48, resigned in February. 
William A. Richardson, elected in March. 
Gerry Wilson, '48. 
John W. Smith. 
Alfred S. Saunders. 

Ward 2. 

William H. Flagg, '48. 
Ivers Taylor. 
Isaac S. Morse, resigned. 
Ambrose Lawrence. 

Ward 3. 
Alfred Gilman, '43, '48. 
Elisha Davis. 
James Dinsmoor. 
Andrew C. Wheelock. 



Nathaniel B. Favor. 
Caleb Crosby. 
Ezekiel Wright. 
Waldo A. Fisher. 

Ward 5. 
Maynard Bragg. 
Joshua Decatur. 
Abram T. Melvin. 
W. W. Morse. 

Ward 6. 
William Lamson, Jr. 
Jeremiah M. Currier, '48. 
George S. Wright. 
John Aiken, *'37, *'41, President. 



George A. Btjtterfeld, Clerk. 



Tl6 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER 
18 50. 



James H. B. Ayer, *'49. 
Joseph Bedlow, *'40, *'49. 
Daniel D. Crombie, *'49. 
James B. Francis, *'49. 



MAYOR : 

JOSIAH B. FRENCH, '36, '42, t '49. 

ALDERMEN: 

Philip Hardy. 
John Mixer, '36, '38. 
Josiah G. Peabody. 
James Townsend, '42. 



Thomas Ordway, City Clerk. 



COMMON COUNCIL: 



Ward 1. 
John W. Smith, '49. 
Daniel R. Kimball. 
James Watson. 
Jonathan Smothers. 

Ward 2= 
Ivers Taylor, '49, President. 
George Gardner. 
Samuel Lawrence, 2d. 
Samuel J. Varney. 

Ward 3. 

Jonathan Page. 
John Tripp. 
Fordyce Coburn. 
Joshua Merrill. 

Geo. A. Butterfield, Clerk, 



Ward 4, 



Abner W. Buttrick, '40, '44. '45. 
Caleb Crosby, '49. 
Benjamin Goddard. 
Nathaniel B. Favor, '49. 
Ward 5. 

George P. Elliot. 

William Fiske, '37, '38, '41. , 

George W. Worthen. 

Maynard Bragg, '49. 

Ward 6 t 

Albert Mallard. 

Stephen P. Sargent. 

George S. Wright, '49. 

Wm. Lampson, Jr., '49, resigned in May 

res'd May. Wm. Lamson, Jr., elected May. 



18 5 1. 



MAYOR: 

JAMES H. B. AYER, * '49, * '50. 

ALDERMEN: 

William Fiske, '37, '38, '41, '50. William North, '37. 

Ambrose Lawrence, '49. Abiel Rolfe, '48. 

James Townsend, '42, *'50. Lucius A. Cutler. 

Philip Hardy, *'50. Joshua Converse, 40. 

Thomas Ordway, City Clerk. 



COMMON COUNCIL: 



Ward 1. 
James Watson, '50, 
Jonathan Smothers, '50. 
Charles B. Coburn, '44. 
Stephen Moar. 

Ward 2. 

Linus Child, *'47. 
George Gardner, '50, President. 
Samuel J. Varney, '50. 
Zachariah B. Caverly. 

Ward 3. 

Fordyce Coburn, '50. 
William Twichell. 
Darius C. Brown. 
Benjamin C. Sargeant. 



Ward 4. 

Benjamin Goddard, '50. 
Ilichard Dennis. 
Holland Streeter. 
Solomon D. Emerson. 

Ward 5. 
George P. Elliot, '50. 
Edward Fifield. 
John N. Ford. 
Theodore H. Sweetser. 



Ward 6. 
George W. Worthen, '50. 
George W. Jones, died in September. 
Stephen P. Sargent, '50. 
Albert Mallard, '50. 

William Lamson, Jr., Clerk, 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER 
18 52. 



117 



MAYOR: 

ELISHA HUNTINGTON, J '37, J '38, t '39, t '40, t '41, t '44, t '45, »'47. 

ALDERMEN: 

Joseph Bedlow, *'40, *'49, *'50. Win. Fiske, '37, '38, '41, '50, *'51. 

Joseph M. Bullens. William North, '37, *'51. 

Samuel Burbank, '40, '41. Alpha Stevens. 

Joseph B. V. Coburn. Samuel J. Varney, '50, '51. 

Thomas Ordway, City Clerk. 



COMMON COUNCIL 



Ward 1. 



Rufus Rogers. 
John C. Smith. 
Jeremiah Clark. 
Paul Hill. 

Ward 2. 

Paul Perkins. 
Milton Bonney. 
William Hovey. 
Zachariah B. Caverly, '51. 
Ward 3. 

Darius C. Brown, '51. 

William Twichell, '51. 

Benjamin C. Sargeant, '51, President. 

Michael B. Caswell. 



Ward 4. 

Holland Streeter, '51. 
Elbridge Livingston. 
Abram French. 
Willard Minot. 

Ward 5. 
Edward Fifield, '51. 
Phineas Whiting, '41. 
George W. Patterson. 
Jonathan Kendall, '42, '44. 

Ward 6. 

Leonard W. Jaquith. 
Seth Pooler. 
Caleb G. Weaver. 
William C. Parker. 



William Lamson, Jr., Clerk, 



18 53. 



MAYOR : 

SEW ALL G. MACK, '43, '44, *'47. 

ALDERMEN: 

Elisha Huntington, % '37, % '38, t '39, f '40, Ira Spalding, '42, '43. 



f41, f'44, f'45, *'47, t'52 
Samuel K. Hutchinson. 
Stephen Mansur, '36, '39, *'40, *'47 
Joseph B. V. Coburn, *'52. 

Thomas Oedway, City Clerk 



Joseph M. Bullens, *'52. 
Alpha Stevens, *'52. 
Joseph White. 



COMMON COUNCIL 



Ward 1. 

Rufus Rogers, '52. 
John C. Smith, '52. 
Marcus A. Thomas. 
James Cook, '36. 

Ward 2. 

Paul Perkins, '52. 
Milton Bonney, '52. 
George G. Bumpus. 
George W. Stanley. 

Ward 3. 

Michael B. Caswell, '52. 
Calvin Philbrick. 
Leonard Brown. 
Henry H. Wilder. 



Ward 4. 



Abram French, '52. 
Henry C. Howe. 
Joseph S. Grush. 
Samuel K. Pickering. 

Ward 5. 
George W. Patterson, '52. 
William A. Richardson, '49, President. 
Patrick Con Ian. 
Jonathan Bowers. 

Ward 6. 
Caleb G. Weaver, '52. 
William C. Parker, '52. 
George F. Woods. 
C. F. Blanchard. 



William Lamsox, Jr., Clerk. 



n8 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER 
IS 54. 



MAYOR : 

SEWALL G. MACK, '43, '44, * '47, t '53. 
ALDERMEN: 

Elisha Huntington, t '37, % '38, f '39, f '40, Joseph White, *'53. 

f'41, f'44, f'45, *'47, f'52, *'53. 
J. B. V. Coburn, *'52, *'53, res'd in Jan. 
Samuel K. Hutchinson, *'53. 
Ira Spalding, '42, '43, *'53. 

William Lamson, Jr. City Clerk. 



Horatio Fletcher, 47. 
C. F. Blanchard, '53. 
Charles Sperry. 



COMMON COUNCIL: 



Ward 1. 

John C. Smith, '52, '53. 
Paul Hill, '52. 
Marcus A. Thomas, '53. 
Thomas Lennon. 

Ward 2. 

George W. Stanley, '53. 
William H. Gage. 
Amos A. Taylor. 
William H. Bradley. 

Ward 3. 

Calvin Philbrick, '53. 
Leonard Brown, '53, declined. 
Darius C. Brown, '51, '52, elected. 
Henry H. Wilder, '53. 
Peter 0. C. Frawley. 



Ward 4. 

Henry C. Howe, '53. 
Joseph S. Grush, '53. 
Samuel K. Pickering, '53. 
Hubbard Wilson. 

Ward 5. 

Wm. A. Richardson, '49, + '53, President 
Jonathan Bowers, '53. 
Patrick Conlan, '53. 
John C. Woodward. 

Ward 6. 

George F. Woods, '53. 
Charles S. Eastman. 
Levi H. Straw. 
William P. Webster. 



Leonard Brown, Clerk. 
18 5 5. 



MAYOR : 

AMBROSE LAWRENCE, '49, '51. 
ALDERMEN: 



Wm. Fiske, '37, '38, '41, '50, *'51, '*52. 
Artemas L. Brooks, *'49. 
Daniel Woodward. 
Lorenzo G. Howe. 

William Lamson, 



Andrew T. Nute. 
Abner Frost. 
William S. Johnson. 
Shadrach R. Brackett. 

Jr., City Clerk. 



Ward 1. 
Maynard Bragg, '49, '50. 
Aaron B. Young. 
Augustus B. Roby. 
George L. Harris. 

Ward 2. 

William G. Morse. 
George K. Paul. 
Mark H. Cook. 
Joseph A. Patten. 

Ward 3. 

Alfred Gilman, '43, '48, '49, 
Daniel Hurd. 
Theodore Warren. 
Stephen K. Fielding. 



COMMON COUNCIL: 

Ward 4. 

Joshua W. Daniels. 
John Bennett. 
Alanson Folsom. 
Francis H. Nourse. 

Ward 5. 
John C. Woodward, '54. 
Stephen Bartlett. 
Jonathan Johnson. 
Oliver P. Rand. 

Ward 6. 

President. Levi H. Straw, '54. 

William T. Whitten. 
Lucien P. Stacy, 
James M. Moore. 

Leonard Brown, Clerk. 






MUNICIPAL REGISTER 
18 56. 



119 



MAYOR: 

ELISHA HUNTINGTON, J '37, J '38, t '39, t '40, t '41, t '44, t '45, * '47, 

t '52, *'53, *'54. 
ALDERMEN: 
Edward Tuck. Charles H. Wilder, '37, '44, '45. 

Samuel Burbank, '40, '41, *'52. O. J. Conant, resigned in March. 

Charles B. Coburn, '44. James H. Rand. 

William P. Webster, '54. Jonathan Johnson, elected in June. 

Hapgood, Wright, '45, '46. 

William Lamson, Jr., City Clerk. 



COMMON COUNCIL 



Ward 1. 

Enos 0. Kingsley. 
Abiel Pevey. 
David M. Collins. 
Marshall E. Thompson. 

Ward 2. 

Isaac Hinckley. 
Seth Gas?e. 
Peter Flanders, Jr. 
Leonard F. Jewell. 

Ward 3. 

David Rogers. 

Benj. C. Sargeant, '51, t'52, President. 

Henry H. Carroll. 

Peter Powers. 



Ward 4. 

Francis H. Nourse, '55. 
Alden B. Buttrick. 
Holland Streeter, '51, '52. 
James Sands. 

Ward 5. 
Frederick Holton. 
Isaac Place. 
Albert Wheeler. 
Abiel Rolfe, '48, *'51. 

Ward 6. 
Eliphalet Hills. 
Jonathan P. Folsom. 
James K. Fellows, '37. 
John K. Chase. 



James J. Maguire, Clerk. 
18 57. 



MAYOR : 

STEPHEN MANSUR, '36, '39, * '40, * '47, * '53. 
ALDERMEN: 

Andrew T. Nute, *'55. John B. Turtle. 

John C. Woodward, '54, '55. Francis H. Nourse, '55, '56. 

Jonathan Smothers, '50, '51. Jonathan Johnson, '55, *'56. 

Samuel W. Stickney. John Nesmith, '39, '40, '42, '48. 

William Lamson, Jr., City Clerk. 



COMMON COUNCIL 



Ward 1. 
Abiel Pevev. 
Stephen T.* Stan ley. 
Charles A. Welch. 
George F. Scribner. 

Ward 2. 

William G. Morse, '55. 
William D. Vinall. 
Temple Tebbetts. 
James M. Howe. 

Ward 3. 

Benjamin C. Sargeant, '51, J '52, J '56. 
David Roeers, '56. 
Henry H. Carroll, '56. 
Nathan Allen. 



Ward 4. 

Caleb Crosby, '49, '50. 
John F. Howe. 
John C. Jepson. 
Alanson Nichols. 

Ward 5. 

Frederick Holton, '56, President. 
William H. Wiggin. 
William Goodale. 
Charles Hubbard. 

Ward 6. 
Erastus Boyden. 
Jonathan Kimball. 
Robert J. Garrett. 
William Nichols. 



Henry A. Lord, Clerk. 



120 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER 
1 8 58. 



MAYOR: 

ELISHA HUNTINGTON, % '37, \ '38. t '39, t '40, t '41, t '44, f '45, * '47, 

t'52, *'53, *'54, t'56. 
ALDERMEN: 

Sewall G. Mack, '43, '44, *'47, t '53, f'54. Joseph M. Dodge, '37. 
Samuel W. Sticknev, *'57. Harvey Silver. 

Abiel Pevey, '56, '57. Albert' Wheeler, '56. 

Jeremiah P. Jewett, 42. Edwin A. Alger. 

John H. McAlvin, City Clerk. 



COMMON COUNCIL: 



Ward 1. 
Charles Wilkins. 
John M. Mavaard. 
John E. Webb. 
William Barnard. 

Ward 2. 
Edward Tuck, *'56. 
William P. Webster, '54, *'56. 
Andrew Blood. 
W'illiam F. Salmon. 

Ward 3. 

Benjamin C. Sargeant, '51, J '52, J '56, 

'57, President. 
Hanover Dickey. 
Joseph A. Brabrook. 
Benjamin S. Butterworth. 



Ward 
Enoch P. Young. 
Zephaniah Goward. 
Jesse Blake. 
John F. Howe, '57. 

Ward 
Willard Dudley. 
Samuel T. Manahan. 
Isaac Page. 
John Avery, 2d. 

Ward 



6. 



William Nichols, '57. 

Alpha B. Farr, resigned in January. 

Leonard Brown, '53, '54, elected in Feb. 

Erastus Boyden, '57. 

James H. Rand, *'56, resigned in May. 

Eben'r Burgess, elected in June. 



Lorenzo G. Howe, *'55. 

Samuel J. Varnev, '50, 51, *'52. 

Paul Hill, '52, '54. 

Ambrose Lawrence, '49, '51, f'55, re 

signed in April. 
Darius C. Brown, '51, '52. 



George Gardner, Clerk. 
18 59. 

MAYOR : 

JAMES COOK, '36, '53. 
ALDERMEN : 

John F. Howe, '57, '58. 
Joshua Converse, '40, *'51, res'd in April. 
J. P. Folsom, '56, resigned in April. 
Edward Tuck, *\56, '58, elected in May. 
Samuel T. Manahan, '58, elected in May. 
Jonathan Ladd, elected in May. 



John H. McAlvin, City Clerk. 



Ward 1. 
John E. Webb, '58. 
Charles Wilkins, '58. 
William Barnard, '58. 
William D. Blanchard. 

Ward 2. 

W. P. Webster, '54, *'56, 
William F. Salmon, '58. 
James M. Howe, '57. 
David Nichols. 

Ward 3. 
George Hobson. 
Asahel D. Puffer. 
John Willoughby. 
Benjamin S. Butterworth, 



COMMON COUNCIL: 

Ward 4. 

Caleb Crosby, '49, '50, '57. 
Jesse Blake, '58. 
George W. Partridge. 
George W. Young. 

Ward 5. 

'58, President. Horatio G. F. Corliss, '44, '46. 

Luther B. Morse. 

Josiah G. Peabody. *'50. 

William Goodale, '57. 

Ward 6. 

Charles A. Stott. 

Levi Sprague. 

Ebenezer Burgess, '58. 
'58. Leonard Brown, '53, '54, '58. 

George Gardner, Clerk. 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER 
I860. 



121 



MAYOR: 

BENJAMIN C. SARGEANT, »51, \ '52, J '56, '57, J '58. 

ALDERMEN : 

Edward F. Watson, '40, '41, *'44, *'45. Henry H. Wilder, '53, '54. 

Lorenzo G. Howe, *'55, *'59. Abner Frost, *'55. 

James Watson, '50, '51. Samuel T. Manahan, '58, *'59. 

William G. Morse, '55, '57. William S. Gardner. 

John H. McAlvin, City Clerk. 



Ward 1. 
Benjamin S. Ireson. 
Enoch Quimby. 
John P. Slocum. 
Amos H. Foster. 

Ward 2. 

Henry P. Clough. 

Alfred S. Saunders, '49. 

Wm. F. Salmon, '58, '59, President 

Joseph L. Sargent. 

Ward 3. 

George Hobson, '59. 
Josiah B. Fielding. 
Henry P. Perkins. 
Hocum Hosford. 



COMMON COUNCIL: 

Ward 4. 

George W. Partridge, '59. 
George W. Young, '59. 
Morrill M. Bohonan. 
Caleb Crosby, '49, '50, '57, '59. 
Ward 5. 

Josiah G. Peabody, *'50, '59. 
Sullivan L. Ward. 
George F. Morey. 
William H. Lamson. 

Ward 6. 

William Nichols, '57, '58. 
Samuel T. Lancaster. 
Charles A. Stott, '59. 
Foster Nowell. 

George Gardner, Clerk. 



18 6 1. 



MAYOR: 

BENJAMIN C. SARGEANT, '51, { '52, \ '56, '57, J '58, t '60. 

ALDERMEN: 



Samuel T. Manahan, '58, *'59. *'60. 
Jonathan P. Folsom, '56, *'59. 
James Watson, '50, '51, *'60. 
William G. Morse, '55, '57, *'60. 
Hocum Hosford, '60. 

John H. McAlvin, City Clerk 



Aldis L. Waite. 

David Whitney, declined acceptance. 
Sager Ashworth, elected in May. 
William S. Gardner, *'60. 



COMMON COUNCIL 



Ward 1. 
Frank E. Jewett. 
M. Gilbert Perkins. 
Jacob Baron. 
William D. Blanchard, '59. 

Ward 2. 

Alfred S. Saunders, '49, '60. 
Joseph L. Sargent, '60. 
Henry P. Clough, '60. 
Henry S. Orange. 

Ward 3. 

William L. North, President. 
George W. Norris. 
Henry P. Perkins, '60. 
James G. Morrison. 

George 



Ward 4. 
Joseph Cater. 
Joseph B. Keyes. 
Morrill M. Bohonan, '60. 
Abel M. Ayer. 

Ward 5. 
Sullivan L. Ward, '60. 
Samuel Beck. 
William H. Parker. 
George F. Morey, '60. 

Ward 6. 

Samuel T. Lancaster, '60. 
Foster, Nowell, '60. 
\ Elon A. Sanborn. 
George E. Dana. 

Gardner, Clerk. 



122 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER 
18 6 2. 



MAYOR: 

HOCUM HOSFORD, '60, *'61. 
ALDERMEN: 

Mertoun C. Bryant. Isaac F. Scripture. 

Edwin A. Alger, *'58. Aldis L. Waite, *'61. 

James B. Francis, *'49, *'50. Albert Wheeler, '56, *'58. 

William A. Burke. Jona. P. Folsom, '56, *'59, *'61. 

John- H. McAlvin, City Clerk. 



COMMON COUNCIL,: 



1 



2. 



Ward 
Amos D. Wright. 
Frank E. Jewett, '61. 
Horatio G. Burgess. 
Charles F. Hard. 

Ward 

Benedict 0. Carpenter. 
William T. McNeill. 
Lorenzo G. Howe, *'55, *'58, *'60. 
Henry S. Orange, '61. 

Ward 3. 

George W. Norris, '61. 
Edmund D. Fletcher. 
Everett W. French. 
John Quinn. 



Ward 4. 
Joseph B. Keyes, 61. 
George Runels. 
John Pettingell. 
Hubbard Willson, '54.^ 

Ward 5. 
Rollin C. Downs. 
Albert Mallard, '50, '51. 
Edward Fitield, '51, '52. 
Cleveland J. Cheney. 

Ward 6. 

George F. Richardson, President 
Albion J. Dudley. 
Elon A. Sanborn, '61. 
Frederick Frve. 



George Gardner, Clerk. 



1863. 



MAYOR: 

HOCUM HOSFORD, '60, *'61, t '62. 



James B. Francis, *'49, *'50. *'62. 
Edwin A. Alger, *'58, *'62. 
Abiel Pevey, '56, '57, *-58. 
William A. Burke, *'62. 



John H. 



ALDERMEN : 

Isaac F. Scripture. *'62. 
Otis Allen, '43, '48. 
Albert Wheeler, '56, *'58, *'62. 
William Nichols, '57, '58, '60. 

McAlvin, City Clerk. 



COMMON COUNCIL 



Ward 1. 

Charles F. Hard, '62. 
Amos D. Wright, '62. 
John Cosgrove. 
William A. Wright. 

Ward 2. 

George F. Sawtell. 
Henry S. Orange, '61, '62. 
Hugh McEvoy. 
Nathaniel Stearns. 

Ward 3. 

Everett W. French, '62. 
Fordvce Coburn, '50, '51. 
Edmund D. Fletcher, '62. 
John Quinn, 62. 



Ward 4. 



Atwell F. Wright. 
Josiah Gates. 
William Stafford. 
John McCann. 

Ward 5. 
James C. Ayer. > 

Charles W. Saunders. 
Cyrus H. Latham. 
John E. Downs. 

Ward 6. 

George F. Richardson, X '62, President. 
Albion J. Dudley, '62. 
Benedict O. Carpenter, '62. 
Frederick Frye, '62. 

George Gardner, Clerk. 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER 
18 6 4. 



123 



MAYOR: 

HOCUM HOSFORD, '60, * '61, t '62, t '63. 

ALDERMEN : 

Wihiani S. Southworth. George W. Norris, '61, '62. 

James B. Francis, *'49, *'50, *'62, *'63. George Runels, '62. 

Dana B. Gove. Cyrus H. Latham, '63. 

William T. McNeill, '62. George F. Richardson, +'62, +'63. 

John H. McAlvin, City Clerk. 



Ward 1. 
Alden B. Watson. 
Lewis L. Perrin. 
Frederick S. Tukey. 
John Cosgrove, '63. 

Ward 2. 

George Ripley, President. 
Andrew F. Jewett. 
Artemas S. Young. 
Hoyt W. Hilton. 

Ward 3. 

Samuel N. Wood. 
Charles W. Dodge. 
'Joseph S. Pollard. 
James G. Morrison, '61. 



COMMON COUNCIL: 



Ward 4. 



Atwell F. Wright, '63. 
Daniel Churchill. 
William W. Sherman. 
Francis Jewett. 

Ward 5. 

John E. Downs, '63. 
'1 homas G. Gerrish, resigned June 14. 
Charles Hubbard, '57. 
Cleveland J. Cheney, '62. 
Ward P 

Levi Sprague, '59. 
Tobias L. P. Lamson. 
Addison Putnam. 
Albion J. Dudley, '62, '63. 

George Gardner. Clerk. 



1 S 6 5. 



MAYOR : 

JOSIAH G. PEABODY, * '50, '59, '60. 

ALDERMEN: 

Ew'dF. Watson, '40, '41, *'44, *'45, *'60. Henry H. Wilder, '53, '54, *'60. 

Josiah Gates. '63. 
Cyrus H. Lathan, '63, *'64. 
William Brown, '45, '46. 

John H. McAlvin, City Clerk. 



George W. Norris, '61, "62. *'64. 

Dana B. Gove, *'64. 

William T. McNeill, '62, *'64. 



COMMON COUNCIL: 



Ward 1. 

Alden B. Watson, '64. 
Lewis L. Perrin, '64. 
George N. Osgood. 
John R. Southwick, '47. 
Ward 2. 

George Ripley, J '64, President 
Andrew F. Jewett, '64. 
Julian V. Keyes. 
Chester W. Rugg. 

Ward 3. 

Joseph S. Pollard, '64. 
Charles W. Dodge, '64. 
Edward C. Rice. 
Frederick T. North. 



Ward 4. 



Francis Jewett, '64. 
Benjamin Walker. 
Benjamin L. Googins. 
John Pearson. 

Ward 5. 

Charles Hubbard, '57, '64. 
James Kent. 
Simeon D. Osterhoudt. 
James Foster. 

Ward 6. 

Tobias L. P. Lamson, '64. 
Luke C. Dodge. 
Gustavus A. Gerry. 
James M. Moore, '55. 

George Gardner, Clerk. 



124 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER 
1866. 



MAYOR: 

JOSIAH G. PEABODY, *'50, '59, '60, f '65. 
ALDERMEN: 



Samuel A. Brown. 
Albert B. Plimpton. 
John R. Southwick, '47, '65. 
Joseph L. Sargent, '60, '61. 

John 



H. 



Charles W. Dodge, '64, '65. 
Josiah Gates, '63, *'65. 
Henry M. Hooke. 
Albion J. Dudley, '62, '63, '64. 

McAlvin, City Clerk. 



Ward 1. 

William A. Hodge. 
William A. Wright, '63. 
Jacob Baron, '61. 
Rollin C. Downs, '62. 

Ward 2. 
Andrew F. Jewett, '64, '65. 
George H. Whitmore. 
Julian V. Keyes, '65. 
Chester W. Rugg, '65. 

• Ward 3. 

Edward C. Rice, '65. 
Frederick T. North, '65. 
James N. Pinkham. 
Oliver W. Smith. 



COMMON COUNCIL: 

Ward 4. 
Benjamin L. Googins, '65. 
Alfred Scott. 
Thomas F. Burgess. 
Benjamin Walker, '65. 

Ward 5. 
Robert H. Butcher. 
John T. Lee. 
George L. Huntoon. 
Jonathan Johnson, '55, *'56, *'57. 

Ward 6. 

Gustavus A. Gerry, '65, President. 
Luke C. Dodge, '65. 
Charles A. Kimball. 
Alfred H. Chase. 



Geokge Gardner, Clerk. 
186 7 . 



MAYOR: 

GEORGE F. RICHARDSON, J '62, | '63, *'64. 
ALDERMEN: 



Charles B. Coburn, '44, '51, *'56. 
Hocum Hosford, '60, *'61, f '62, t '63, f '64, 
John R. Southwick, '47, '65, *'66. 
Joseph L. Sargent, '60, '61, *'66. 
Edward C. Rice, '65, '66. 



Abner W. Buttrick, '40, '44, '45, '50; 

died June 29, '67. 
Wm. E. Livingston, elected Sept. 9, '67. 
William H. Parker, '61. 
Albion J. Dudley, '62, '63, '64, *'66. 



John H. McAlvin, City Clerk. 



COMMON COUNCIL: 



Ward 1. 
John Shepard. 
Calvin Sawtell. 
Foster Wilson. 
M. Gilbert Perkins, '61. 

Ward 2. 
Gustavus A. Gerry, '65, J ' 66 » President. 
Ruel J. Walker. 
William Dobbins. 
Silas Tyler, Jr. 

Ward 3. 

Jona. P. Folsom, '56, *'59, *'61, *'62. 
Frederick T. North, '65, '66. 
Samuel D. Prescott. 
Nathan M. Wright. 



Ward 4. 
John B. Hunt. 
John Q. A. Hubbard. 
Alfred Scott, '66. 
Thomas F. Burgess, '66. 

Ward 5. 

George L. Huntoon, '66. 
George S. Cheney. 
James Foster, '65. 
John T. Lee, '66. 

Ward 6. 

Alfred H. Chase, '66. 

James Lawton. 

John N. Pierce, Jr. 

Foster Nowell, '60, '61, res'd May 14, '67. 

William Kittredge, elected Sept. 9, '67. 



George Gardner, Clerk. 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER 
1868. 



125 



MAYOR: 

GEORGE F. RICHARDSON, % '62, % '63, *'64, t '67. 
\ ALDERMEN : 



Charles B. Coburn, '44, '51, *'56, *'67. 
Francis Jewett, '64, '65. 
John M. Pevey, resigned in July. 
Charles L. Hildreth, elected in September 
Silas Tyler, Jr., '67. 

John H. McAlvin, City Clerk. 



Edward C. Rice, '65, '66, *'67. 
William E. Livingston, *'67. 
Frederic Frve, '62, '63. 
Albion J. Dudley, '62, '63, '64, *'66, *'67. 



COMMON COUNCIL 



Ward 1. 

Calvin Sawtell, '67. 
John Shepard, '67. 
John F. Merrill. 
Frederic T. Greenhalge. 

Ward 2. 
Francis D. Munn. 
Joseph A. Patten, '55. 
Ruel J. Walker, '67. 
Henry S. Orange, '61, '62, '63. 

Ward 3. 

George W. Badger. 
Samuel D. Prescott, '67. 
William Walker. 
Albert A. Haggett. 



George 



Ward 4. 

William H. Anderson. 
John Q. A. Hubbard, '67. 
Charles T. Crane. 
John B. Hunt, '67. 

Ward 5. 
Edwin Lamson. 
George S. Cheney, '67. 
William Kelley. 
Ethan N. Spencer. 

Ward 6. 

John N. Pierce, Jr., '67. 

James Lawton, '67. 

Francis Brown. 

Alfred H. Chase, '66, '67, President. 

Gardner, Clerk. 



1869. 



MAYOR: 

JONATHAN P. FOLSOM, '56, * '59, * '61, * '62, '67. 
ALDERMEN: 

Francis Jewett. '64, '65, *'68. Hapgood Wright, '45, '46, *'56. 

Henry H. Wilder, '53, '54, *'60, '65. John Q. A. Hubbard, '67, '68. 

Charles L. Hildreth, *'68. George S. Cheney, '67, '68. 

Cyrus H. Latham, '63, *'64, *'65. Charles A. Stott, '59, '60. 

John H. McAlvin, City Clerk. Resigned March 15, 1869. 
Samuel A. McPhetres, City Clerk. Elected March 15, 1869. 



COMMON COUNCIL 



Ward 1. 

Frederic T. Greenhalge, '68. 
John H. Durgin, Jr. 
Patrick Keyes. 
Benjamin Patch. 

Ward 2. 
Joseph A. Patten, '55, '68. 
Phineas Jones. 
Francis D. Munn, '68. 
Amos Sanborn. 

Ward 3. 



Ward 4. 



William H. Anderson, '68, President. 
Simeon G. Lyford. 
Henry P. Carter. 
Epaphras A. Hill. 

Ward 5. 

William Kelley, '68. . 
Willard A. Brown. 
William 0. Fiske. 
Edwin Lamson, '68. 

Ward 6. 



George W. Badger, '68. 
Albert A. Haggett, '68. 
William Walker, '68. 
George E. Pinkham. 



Francis Brown, '68. 
Alpha B. Farr, '58. 
Lucian P. Stacy, '55. 
William Kittredge, '67. 

George Gardner, Clerk. 



126 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER 

18 70. 



MAYOR : 

JONATHAN P. FOLSOM, '56, * '59, *'61, * '62, '67, t '69. 

ALDERMEN: 

Edward F. Sherman. Hapgood Wright, '45, '46, *'56, *'69. 

Frank F. Battles. John Q. A. Hubbard, '67, '68, *'69.~ 

Charles L. Hildreth, *'68, *'69. Addison Putnam, 64. 

Amos B. French. Charles A. Stott, '59, '60, *'69. 

Samuel A. McPhetres, City Clerk. 



COMMON COUNCIL: 



Ward 1. 

John H. Durgin, Jr., '69. 
Benjamin Patch, '69. 
Patrick Keyes, '69 . 
Samuel G. Ladd. 

Ward 2. 
Phineas Jones, '69. 
John L. Moulton. 
Patrick Cummiskev. 
David G. Skillingsl 

Ward 3. 

Albert A. Haggett, '68, '69, President. 

Henrv P. Perkins, '60, '61. 

Hocum Hosford, '60, *'61, f'62, f'63, 

f'64, *'67, declined. 
Matthew Donovan. 
John L. Meadowcroft, elected Jan. 24. 



Ward 4. 



Epaphras A. Hill, '69. 
Henrv P. Carter, '69. 
Simeon G. Lyford, '69. 
Michael Corbett. 

Ward 5. 

William 0. Fiske, '69. 
WillardA. Brown, '69. 
James D. liartwell. 
Jeremiah Crowley. 

Ward 6. 
Alpha B. Farr, '58, '69. 
William Kittredge, '67, '69. 
Lucian P. Stacy, '55, '69. 
John Stott. 



Geokge Gardner, Clerk. 
18 7 1. 



MAYOR: 

EDWARD F. SHERMAN, * '70. 
ALDERMEN: 

Frank F. Battles, *'70. Albert A. Haggett, '68, '69, i ,0. 

William F. Salmon, '58, '59, + '60. Henry C. Howe, '53, '54. 

John W. Smith, '49, '50. Frederick Ayer. 

Amos B. French, *'70. Addison Putnam, '64, *'70. 

Samuel A. McPhetres, City Clerk. 



Ward 1. 
John H. Durgin, Jr., '69, ' 
Samuel G. Ladd, 70. 
Francis N. J. Haviland. 
Joel Knapp. 

Ward 2. 

William Dobbins, '67. 
John L. Moulton, '70. 
Patrick Cummiskey, 70. 
Amos A. Blanchard. 

Ward 3. 
Henry P. Perkins, '60, '61 
John L. Meadowcroft, 70. 
Horace Ela. 
Julius C. Jockow. 



70. 



COMMON COUNCIL: 

Ward 4. 

Benjamin Walker, '65, '66. 
Michael Corbett, 70. 
Francis H. Chandler. 
Charles T. Goddard. 

Ward 5. 

Jeremiah Crowley, 70. 
Crawford Burnham. 
Henry C. Church. 
Patrick Lynch. 

Ward 6. 

, 70, President. Leonard Brown, '53, '54, '58, '59. 
John Stott, 70. 
Abel T. Atherton. 
Nathaniel C. Sanborn. 

George Gardner, Clerk. 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER 
1 8 7 2. 

MAYOR: 

JOSIAH G. PEABODY, *'50, '59, '60, t '65, t '66. 
ALDERMEN: 

Henry C. Howe, '53, '54, *71. Frederick T. North, '65, '66, '67. 

Alexander G. Cumnock. Benjamin Walker, '65, '66, 71. 

Benjamin Patch, '69, 70. William Kelley, '68, '69. 

Gustavus A. Gerry, '65, J '66, + '67. Alpha B. Farr, '58, '69, 70. 

Samuel, A. McPhetres, City Clerk. 



127 



Ward 1. 

John E. Webb, '58, '59. 
Alonzo F. Caswell. 
Southwell Farrington. 
True P. Jordan. 

Ward 2. 
Leonard Brown, '53, '54, 
Amos A. Blanchard, 71. 
Joseph S. Brown. 
Earl A. Thissell. 

Ward 3. 
Henry P. Perkins, '60, '61 
Horace Ela, 71. 
Julius C. Jockow, 71. 
Charles F. Tilton. 



COMMON COUNCIL: 

Ward 4. 

Nathaniel P. Favor. 
Nathan W. Frye. 
Henry A. Lord. 
Alonzo L. Russell. 

Ward 5. 

'58, '59, 71. Crawford Burnham, 71. 

Charles F. Belden. 
Luther J. Fames. 
William Shepard. 

Ward 6. 

, 70, X 71, Pres. Abel T. Atherton, 71. 

Nathaniel C. Sanborn, 71. 
Samuel M. Chase. 
Julian Talbot. 

George Gardner, Clerk. 



1 8 7 3. 

MAYOR: 

FRANCIS JEWETT, '64, '65, *'68, * '69. 
ALDERMEN : 

Jonathan P. Folsom, '56, *'59, *'61, *'62, 

'67, t '69, f 70. 
George Runels, '62, *'64. 
Edward Tuck, *'56, '58, *'59, declined. 
Isaac Farrington, '46, '47, declined. 
William Dobbins, '67, 71, elected Jan. 14. 

Samuel A. McPhetres, City Clerk. 



Charles A. F. Swan, elected January 14. 
Jacob H. Sawyer. 
Jeremiah Crowlev, 70, 71. 
Alpha B. Farr, '58, '69, 70, *72. 
George Stevens. 



COMMON COUNCIL: 



Ward 1. 

John E. Webb, '58, '59, 72. 
Alonzo F. Caswell, 72. 
Frank Brady. 
Stephen J. Smiley. 

Ward 2. 

Joseph S. Brown, 72. 
Earl A. Thissell, 72. 
Daniel Stickney. 
Edward P. Woods. 

Ward 3. 
Albert A. Haggett, '68, '69, +70, *71, Pres. 
Charles F. Tilton, 72, resigned March 1. 
William Bass. 
James Owens. 
James A. Loughlin, elected April 8. 



Ward 4. 
Atwell F. Wright, '63, '64. 
Nathaniel P. Favor, 72. 
Nathan W. Frye, 72. 
Henry A. Lord, 72. 

Ward 5. 

Robert H. Butcher, '66. 
Charles F. Belden, 72. 
Jared P. Maxfield. 
George Smith. 

Ward 6. 
Nathaniel C. Sanborn, 71, 72. 
Samuel M. Chase, 72. 
George W. S. Hurd. 
Artemas S. Tyler. 



George Gardner, CleTk. 



128 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER 
18 7 4. 



MAYOR: 

FRANCIS JEWETT, '64, '65, * '68, * '69, t '73. 

ALDERMEN: 
Jeremiah Crowley, 70, 71, *73. Jonathan Kendall, '42, '44, '52.. 

Benjamin Walker, '65, '66, 71, *72. George L. Huntoon. '66, '67. 

Nathaniel C. Sanborn, 71, 72, 73. 

George Stevens, *73. 

McPhetres, City Clerk. 



Alonzo F. Caswell, 72, 73. 
Joseph S. Brown, 72, 73. 

Samuel 



A. 



COMMON COUNCIL: 



Ward 1. 

Charles A. Welch, '57. 
Frank Brady, 73. 
Stephen J. Smiley, 73. 
Charles H. Harvey. 

Ward 2. 

Daniel Stickney, 73. 
Edward P. Woods, 73. 
Charles J. Eastman. 
Edward E. Reed. 

Ward 3. 
Julius C. Jockow, 71, 72. 
James Owens, 73. 
James A. Loughlin, 73. 
George W. Tilton. 



Ward 4. 
Charles T. Goddard, 71. 
Nathan W. Frye, 72, 73, President. 
Jacob H. Sawyer, *73. 
Julian A. Richardson. 

Ward 5. 

Jared P. Maxfield, 73. 
John B. Lyt'ord, 
Samuel P. Marin. 
John Scott. 

Ward 6. 

George W. S. Hurd, 73. 
Joel A. Abbott. 
Thomas Carolin. 
Jason Fuller. 



George Gardner, Clerk, died May 29. 
David Chase, Cierk, elected June 4. 

18 7 5. 



MAYOR: 

FRANCIS JEWETT, '64, '65, * '68, * '69, t '73, t ,74. 

ALDERMEN: 

Benjamin Walker, '65, '66, 71, *72, *74. Hapgood Wright, '45, '46, *'56, *'69. 



Jacob Rogers 

John A. Goodwin. 

Joseph S. Brown, 72, 73, *74 

Samuel A. McPhetres, City Clerk 



James Owens, 73, 74. 
Alden B. Richardson. 
Samuel A. Chase. 



COMMON COUNCIL: 



Ward 1. 

Charles A. Welch, '57, 74. 
Charles H. Harvey, 74. 
John F. Howard. 
John W. Welch. 

Ward 2. 

Earl A. Thissell, 72, 73. 
Edward E. Reed, 74. 
William A. Read. 
Leavitt R. J. Varnum. 

Ward 3. 

Albert A. Haggett, '68, '69, J 
George W. Tilton, 74. 
Charles Cowley. 
Thomas R. Garity. 



Ward 4. 



Josiah Butler. 
Francis Carll. 
Edward P. Dennis. 
Edward Stockman. 

Ward 5. 

James D. Hartwell, 70. 
John B. Lvford, 74. 
Orford R. Blood. 
Charles W. Sleeper. 

Ward 6. 

70, *71. Joel A. 4bbott, 74. 

[X 73, Pres. Thomas oarolin, 74. 

Jason Fuller, 74. 

Albert D. Wright. 

David Chase, Clerk. 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER 
1876. 



129 



CHARLES 



'70. 



MAYOR: 

A. STOTT, '59, '60, * '69, 
ALDERMEN: 

Jacob Rogers, *75. Henry A. Hildreth. 

John A. Goodwin, *75. [J 73, + 75. George E. Stanley. 

Albert A. Haggett, '68, '69, +70, *71, Francis Carll, 75. 
Charles F. Belden, 72, 73. William H. Wiggin, '57. 

Samuel. A. McPhetres, City Clerk. 



COMMON COUNCIL: 



Ward 1. 



John W. Welch, 75. 
Lewis Stiles. 
Daniel W. Manning. 
David M. Collins, '56, declined. 
John F. Howard, 75, elected January 
Ward 2. 

Leavitt R. J. Varnum, 75. 
Charles E. Hallowell. 
Charles Callahan. 
William A. Read, 75. 

Ward 3. 

Charles Cowley, 75. 

Charles H. Kimball. 

Charles Runels. 

James Howard, died after election. 

William H. Grady, elected January 11, 

David 



Ward 4. 

Edward Stockman, 75, resigned May 23. 
Gardner W. King. 
Stephen H. Jones. 
Charles D. Starbird. 
11. James W. Bennett, elected June 22. 

Ward 5. 
Orford R. Blood 75. 

John F. Kimball, President from May 23. 
Charles H. Hanson. 
M. Gilbert Perkins, '61, '67. 

Ward 6. 
Edwin Sanborn. 

Benjamin C. Dean, Pres., resig'd May 28. 
Charles H. Walker. 
John J. Pickman. 
Willis Farrington, elected June 22. 

Chase, Clerk. 



18 7 7. 



MAYOR : 

CHARLES A. STOTT, '59, '60, * '69, * '70, t '76. 
ALDERMEN:, 

Jeremiah Crowley, 70, 71, *73, *74. Orford R. Blood, 75, 76, seat vacated. 

Horace R. Barker. Stephen B. Puffer, declined el. January 2. 

George E. Stanley, *76. Robert Park. 

Charles H. Kimball 76. George E. Pinkham, '69. 

George P. Walker. 

Samuel A. McPhetres, City .Clerk. 



COMMON COUNCIL: 



Ward 1. 



Daniel W. Manning, 76. 

Lewis Stiles, 76. 

John Courtney. 

Frank Bradv, 73, 74, resig'ed March 27. 

Jared P. Maxfield, 73, 74, elected May 8. 

Ward 2. 

Charles E. Hallowell, 76. 
Francis D. Munn, '68, 69. 
Charles H. Robbins. 
Oliver M. Harding. 

Ward 3. 

William H. Grady, 76. 
Patrick Lynch. 
Simon Kelly. 
George E. Davis. 



David Chase. Clerk. 



Ward 4. 
Gardner W. King, 76. 
James W. Bennett, 76. 
Irving K. Goodale. 
Orlnado Blodgett. 

Ward 5. 
John F. Kimball, J 76. 
Charles H. Hanson 76. 
Peter S. Coburn. 
Robert Goulding. 

Ward 6. 
Edwin Sanborn, 76. 
John J. Pickman, 76. 
Charles H. Walker, 76. 
Augustus E. Spaulding, dec. January 10 
George S. Cushing, elected February 6. 



130 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER 
18 7 8. 



Stephen B. Puffer, *77. 
Robert Park, *77. 
Horace R. Barker, *77. 
George F. Scribner, '57. 



MAYOR: 

JOHN A. G. RICHARDSON. 

ALDERMEN: 

George E. Scripture. 

Joseph S. Pollard, '64, '65, [*77. 

Jeremiah Crowlev, 70, 71, *73, *74, 
Nathaniel C. Sanborn, 71, 72, 73, *74. 



Samuel A. McPhetres, City Clerk. 



Ward 1. 

John Courtney, 77. 
John J. Mealey. 
Joseph M. Ambrose. 
Charles H. Harvey, 74, 75. 
Ward 2. 

Oramel A. Brigham. 
Edward M. Tucke. 
William W. Clark. 
Albert W. Monty. 

Ward 3. 

Simon Kelly, 77. 
Edward Cawley. 
Henry P. Morris. 
Samuel D. Buttenvorth. 



._). 



COMMON COUNCIL: 

Ward 

Irving K. Goodale, 77. 
Orlando Blodgett, 77. 
Robert G. Bartlett. 
Stephen H. Jones, 76. 

Ward 

Robert Goulding, 77. 

Peter 8. Coburn, 77. 

John F. Kimhall, J 76, % '77, President 

Enos 0. Kingsley, '56. 

Ward 6. 

• George S. Cushimr, 77. 
Eli W. Hoyt. 
Luke B. Taylor. 

Miles F. Brennan, to January 22. 
Thomas Nesmith, from January 22. 

David Chase, Clerk. 



18 7 9. 



Horace R. Barker, *77, *78. 
Charles A. R. Dimon. 
Joseph S. Pollard, '64, '65, *78. 
Charles S. Lilley. 

Samvel A. 



MAYOR: 

JOHN A. G. RICHARDSON, 178. 
ALDERMEN: 

George E. Scripture, *78. 



.>< 



George F. Scribner, 
Charles F. Howe. 
Robert Goulding, 77, 78. 

McPhetres, City Clerk. 



*78. 



COMMON COUNCIL; 



Ward 1. 

Joseph M. Ambrose, 78. 
John O'Donnell. 
James Kelly. 
Richard J. Noonan. 

Ward 2. 

Albert W. Monty, 78. 
Charles H. Richardson. 
William K. Chase, resigned November 
Edwin A. Robinson- 
Edward M. Tucke, 78, elected Dec. 9. 
Ward 3. 

Edward Cawley, 78. 
Henry P. Morris, 78. 
William T. Benson. 
Patrick A. Rogers. 

David 



Ward 4. 
Robert G. Bartlett, 78. 
Fred Woodies. 
Charles F. Yarnum. 
Charles E. Farrington. 

Ward 5. 
Albert W. Burnham. 
Ambrose L. Ready. 
Joseph M. Wilson. 
Edward B. Peirce. President. 

Ward 6. 

Eli W. Hoyt, 78. 
Luke B. Tavlor, 78. 
Major A. Shaw. 
Miles F. Brennan, 78. 

Chase, Clerk. 



25. 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER 
18 8 0. 



131 



MAYOR: 

FREDERIC T. GREENHALGE, '68, '69. 

ALDERMEN: 

James D. Hartwell, 70, 75. Isaac F. Scripture, *'62, *'63. 

Atvvill F. Wright, '63, '64. Robert Wood. 

Charles H. Richardson. Charles H. Coburn. 

Edwin Lamson, '68, '69. James C. Abbott. 

Samuel A. McPhetres, City Clerk. 



Ward 1. 

James Kelly, 79. 
Richard J. Noonan, 79. 
Thomas J. Flynn. 
Lawrence Cummings. 

Ward 2. 
Edwin A. Robinson, 79. 
Wilbur L. Bates. 
Samuel W. Foster. 
Earl A. Thissell, 72, 73, 

Ward 3. 

Peter H. Donohoe. 
William T. Benson, 79. 
Patrick A. Rogers, 79. 
Frank Wood. 



COMMON COUNCIL: 



Ward 4. 



75, President. 



Fred Woodies, 79. 
Charles F. Varnum, 79. 
Charles E. Farrington, 79. 
Charles D. Starbird, 76. 

Ward 5. 

Joseph M. Wilson, 79. 
Ambrose L. Ready, 79. 
Samuel Hosmer. 
Edward B. Peirce, % 79. 

Ward 6. 



Benjamin F. Freeman. 
J. Tyler Stevens. 
Charles C. Hutchinson. 
Henry C. Cooper. 

David Chase, Clerk. 



18 8 1. 



FREDERIC T. 



MAYOR : 

GREENHALGE, 
ALDERMEN: 



'68, '69, t '80. 



Charles H. Richardson, *'80. 
Isaac F. Scripture, *'62, *'63, *'80. 
Robert Wood, *'80. 
Ambroso L. Ready, 79, '80. 

Samuel A. 



Levi Sprague, '59, '64. 
Julius A. Stiles. 
Samuel D. Butterworth, 78. 
Thomas R. Garity, 75. 

McPhetres, City Clerk. 



COMMON COUNCIL: 



Ward 1. 
Thomas J. Flynn, '80. 
Lawrence Cummings, '80. 
Robert J. Thomas. 
Jeremiah J. Hayes. 

Ward 2. 

Zachariah D. Hall. 
James M. Howe, '57, '59. 
Hubert M. Potter. 
Moses Gibson. 

Ward 3. 

Frank Wood, '80. 
Peter H. Donohoe, '80. 
John E. Maguire. 
D. Moody Prescott. 



Ward 4. 



Julius C. Johnson. 
Stephen C. Davis. 
Edward Garner. 
William N. Osgood. 

Ward 5. 
Atkinson C. Varnum. 
Samuel Hosmer, '80. 
Samuel P. Marin, 74. 
Albert W. Burnham, 79. 

Ward 6. 

Charles C. Hutchinson, '80. 
Albert G. Thompson. 
Thomas Nesmith, 78. 
Lawrence J. Smith. 



David Chase, Clerk. 



132 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER 
1882. 

MAY OB: 

GEORGE RUNELS, '62, *'64. 
ALDERMEN: 



D. Moody Prescott, '81. 
George S. Cushing, 77, 78. 
John F. Phillips, 
f John Welch. 



Thomas R. Garity, 75, *'81, Chairman. 

* Charles W. Sleeper. 
George B. Smith. 
William A. Wright, '63, '66. 
David Whitaker. 

% Samuel A. McPhetees, City Clerk. § David W 

* Resigned, May 23; special election to fill vacancy, June 20. 
t Elected June 20, to fill vacancy. J Died Sept. 29, 1882 



O'Brien, City Clerk. 
§ Elected Oct. 4, 1882. 



Ward 1. 
Robert J. Thomas, '81. 
Jeremiah J. Hayes, '81. 
Dennis J. Crowley. 
John A. Walsh. 

Ward 2. 
Zachariah D. Hall, '81. 
James M. Howe, '57, '59, '81, 
Moses Gibson, '81. 
James F. Puffer, Jr. 

Ward 3. 

Frank Wood, '80, '81. 
John E. Maguire, '81. 
John J. Mead. 
James Grady. 



COMMON COUNCIL: 

Ward 4. 

Julius C. Johnson, '81. 
Stephen C. Davis. '81. 
Edward Garner. • 

William N. Osgood, '81, President. 
Ward 5. 

Atkinson C. Varnum, '81. 
Albert W. Burnham, 79, '81. 
Artemas B. Woodworth. 
Horace B. Barnes. 

Ward 6. 

Albert G. Thompson, '81. 
Lawrence J. Smith, '81. 
Thaddeus S. Cobb. 
Miles J. Fletcher. 

David Chase, Clerk. 



1 8 83. 

MAYOR : 

JOHN J. DONOVAN. 



John F. Phillips, *'82, Chairman. 
George B. Smith,, *'82. 
Robert J. Thomas, '81, '82. 
David Whitaker, *'82. 

David \Y 



ALDERMEN: 

D. Moody Prescott, '81, *'82. 
George W. Fifield. 
John Welch, *'82. 
Miles J. Fletcher, '82. 

. O'Brien, City Clerk. 



Ward 1. 

Dennis J. Crowley, '82. 
John J. Hogan. 
James H. Cahill. 
Daniel Murphy. 

Ward 2. 

Samuel Lawrence, '50. 
Joseph S. Brown, 72, 73, 
Albert W. Monty, 78, 79. 
John F. Thissell. 

Ward 3. 
James Grady, '82. 
John J. Mead, '82. 
Patrick J. Smith. 
Frank J. Donohue. 



COMMON COUNCIL: 

Ward 4. 
James G. Elliott. 
Solomon K. Dexter. 
Alonzo L. Russell, 72. 
Geo. A. Bennett. 

Ward 5. 
Edward B. Pierce, +79, '80. 
*74 *75. Artemas B. Woodworth, '82. 

John P. Mahoney. 
George L. Ash worth. 

Ward 6. 

Lawrence J. Smith, '81, '82* 
Thaddens S. Cobb, '82- 
J. Frank Page. 
Michael F. Clark. 

David Chase, Clerk. 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER 

18 8 4:. 



133 



MAYOR : 

JOHN J. DONOVAN, t '33. 
ALDERMEN : 

Robert J. Thomas, '81, '82, *'83, Chair'n, Jeremiah Crowley, 70, 71, *73, *74, 



Miles J. Fletcher, '82, *'83. 
George W. Fiheld, '83. 
Thaddeus S. Cobb, '82, '83. 
Edward B. Quinn. 



*'77 *'78 

Peter H.' Donohoe, '80, '81. 
Freeman B. Shedd. 



David W. O'Brien, City Clerk. 



COMMON COUNCIL : 



Ward 1. 

John J. Hogan, '83, President. 
James H. Cahiil, '83. 
Daniel Murphy, '83. 
James H. Morrison. 

Ward 2. 

Joseph S. Brown, 72, 73, *74, *75, ' 
Albert W. Monty, 78, 79, '83. 
Earl A. Thissell, 72, 73, 75, t'80. 
John R. Pike. 

Ward 3. 
Patrick J. Smith, '83. 
Peter J. Brady. 
Thomas J. Sparks. 
John Nolan. 

David 



Ward 4. 

James G. Elliott, '83. 
Solomon K. Dexter, '83. 
Alonzo L. Russell, 72, '83. 
George A. Bennett, '83. 

Ward 5. 

83. Edward B. Peirce, % 79, '80, % '83. 
George L. Ashworth, 
Joseph M. Wilson, 79, '80. 
James S. Hanson. 

Ward 6. 

J. Frank Page, '83. 
Michael F. Clark, '83. 
Alfred M. Chadwick. 
Marcellus H. Fletcher. 

Chase, Clerk. 



18 8 5. 



MAYOR : 

EDWARD J. NOYES. 

ALDERMEN: 

John F. Phillips, *'82, *'83, Chairman. James D. Hartwell, 70, 75, *'80. 

John F. Howe, '57, '58, *'59. George F. Penniman. 

William D. Brown. Oliver E. Cushing. 

George E. Stanley, *76, *77. James Francis. 

Samuel M. Chase, City Clerk. 



Ward 1. 

Patrick H. Plunkett. 
James H. Morrison, '84. 
Thomas J. Enright. 
Henry F. Keyes. 

Ward 2. 

George W. Brothers. 
Walter M. Sawyer. 
James R. Fulton. 
Francis D. Munn, Jr. 

Ward 3. 

Peter J. Brady, '84. 
Patrick J. Smith, '83, '84. 
John Nolan, '84. 
Thomas J. Sparks, '84. 



COMMON COUNCIL: 



Ward 4. 



Arnold S. Welch. 
George A. Roper. 
William A. Lang. 
Frank W. Howe. 

Ward 5. 

Wilson W. Carey. 
James S. Hanson, '84. 
Henry L. Newhall. 
Elwyn W. Lovejoy. 

Ward 6. 

Alfred M. Chadwick, '84, President. 
George R. Richardson. 
Luke B. Taylor, 78, 79. 
William H. White. 



David Chase, Clerk. 



134 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER 
18 86. 



MAYOR: 

JAMES C. ABBOTT. 
ALDERMEN: 

Jeremiah Crowley, 70, 71, *73, *74, Daniel Wright. 



*77, *78, *'84, Chairman 
John F. Phillips, *'82, *'83, *'85. 
Stephen B. Puffer, *77, *78. 
George E. Stanley, *76, *77, *'85. 

Samuel M. Chase, City Clerk 



Samuel D. Lutterworth, *78, *'81. 
George F. Penniman, *'85. 
James Francis, *'85. 



Ward 1. 
Peter B. Sherlock. 
Patrick 11. Plunkett, '85. 
Thomas J. Enright, '85. 
Timothy H. Brennan. 

Ward 2. 

Walter M. Sawyer, '85, President 
Charles H. Richardson, 79. 
James R. Fulton, '85. 
Francis D. Munn, Jr., '85. 
Ward 3. 

Daniel Cleary. 
Patrick J. Mahan. 
Edward D. McVey. 
Thomas J. Sparks, '84, '85. 



COMMON COUNCIL: 

Ward 4. 
Arnold S. Welch, '85. 
George A. Roper, '85. 
Frank W. Howe, '85. 
William A. Lang, '85. 

Ward 5. 

Henry L. Newhall, '85. 
Elwyn W. Lovejoy, '85. 
Wilson W. Carev, '85. 
Roswell M. Boutwell, '85. 

Ward 6. 

Lawrence J. Smith, '81, '82, '83. 
John E. Drury. 
Charles H. Hobson. 
Marcellus H. Fletcher, '84. 

David Chase, Clerk. 



18 8 7. 



MAYOR: 

JAMES C. ABBOTT, t '86. 
ALDERMEN: 

Stephen B. Puffer, *77, *78, *'86, Chai'n. Peter H. Donohoe, '80, 81, *'84. 



Nathan D. Pratt. 
Francis C. Plunkett. 
August Fels. 



Miles J. Fletcher, '82, *'83, *'84. 
Frederick Frve, '62, '63, *'68. 
Marcellus H. Fletcher, '84, '86. 

David W. O'Obeien, City Clerk. 



COMMON COUNCIL 



Ward 1. 

Michael J. Garvey. 
Dennis A. Sullivan. 
Daniel Murphy, '83, '84. 
Dennis J. Leary. 

Ward 2. 

Walter M. Sawyer, + '86. 
Charles H. Richardson, 79, '86. 
George C. Evans. 
Horace P. Beals. 

Ward 3. 

George B. McKenna. 
John Nolan, '84, '85. 
Daniel Cleary, '86. 
Patrick J. Smith, '83, '84, '85. 

William J. 



Ward 4. 



Millard F. Wright. 
Edmund B. Conant. 
Jesse H. Shepard. 
Richard Dobbins. 

Ward 5. 

Roswell M. Boutwell, '86. 
George W. Brothers, '85. 
Clarence G. Coburn. 
James H. Carmichael, President. 
Ward 6. 

Richard B. Allen. 
John E% Drury, '86. 
Patrick Conlon. 
Edward Gallagher. 

Coughlin, Clerk. 



George A. Scribner. 
George E. Putnam. 
Charles Runels, 76. 
Charles E. Carter. 
Edward D. Holden. 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER 135 

1 8 88. 

MAYOR: 

CHARLES D. PALMER. 
ALDERMEN: 

Arthur Staples. 

Roswell M. Boutwell, '86, '87. 

Alfred M. Chadwick, '84, + '85, Chairm'B. 

Gikakd P. Dadman, City Clerk. 



"Ward 1. 

Dennis A. Sullivan. '87. 
Dennis J. Leary, '87. 
Daniel Murphy, '83, '84, 
Michael J. Garvey, '87. 
Ward 2, 

Frank J. Sherwood. 
Horace 1'. Beals, 'fc7- 
Harry E. Shaw. 
Pierre A. Brousseau. 

Ward 3 



Jo, 



John F. Rogers. 
Owen M. Donohoe. 
Thomas J. Sparks, '84, ' 
*John F. Roane, 
t Patrick H. Brosnahan. 

^Resigned Aug. 9. Special Election to 
fill vacancy Sept. 18. 

t Elected Sept. 18 to fill vacancy 



COMMON COUNCIL.: 

Ward 4. 

*Millard F. Wright, '87. 
Edmund B. Conant, '87, President. 
'87. Jesse H. Shepard, '87. 

Richard Dobbins. '87. 
t AlonzoG. Wa.'sh. 

*Resigned April 24. Special Election to 
111! vacancy June 5". 
• , f Elected June 5 to fill vacancy. 

Ward 5. 

Charles C. Hartwell. 
Clarence G. Cobum, '87. 
Georsre W. Brothers, '85. 
Joseph S. Lapierre. 

Ward 6. 

William E. Westall. 
Frank Brown. 
Richard B. Allen, '87. 
Abbott Lawrence. 



David Chase, Clerk 
18 8 9. 



MAYOR : 

CHARLES D. PALMER, 
ALDERMEN : 



'88. 



George A. Scribner, *'88. 
Walter M. Sawyer, '85, +'86, '87-. 
George E. Putnam, ^''i'S. 
Edward D. Holden. 

GlRARD 



P. 



Roswdl M. Boutwell, '86, '87, *'f 
John H. Fuller. 
William F. Senter. 
John E. Drury, '86, '87. 
Dadman, City Clerk. 



Ch'n. 



1. 



COMMON COUNCIL: 



Ward 
Patrick J. Savage. 
Joseph H. Callahan. 
Daniel H. Courtney. 
William J. Johnson. 

Ward 2. 

*Samuel C. Georg°. 
Pierre A. Brousseau, '88. 
Arthur H. Cluer. 
Frank J. Sherwood, '88. 
t James Stuart Murphy. 
*Res'd June 9. fEle. July 2, to fill vacancy 
Ward 3. 

Owen M. Donohoe, '88. 

Stephen Garrity. 

Patrick H. Brosnahan, '88. 

Thomas J. Sparks, '84, '85, '86, '88. 

David Chase, 



W 7 ARD 4, 

B. Frank Hale. 
Edwards Chenev. 
Alonzo G. Walsh, '88. 
Frank Gray. 

Ward 5. 

Orford R. Blood, '75, 76 
Charles C. Hartwell, '88. 
Henry W. Ladd. 
Henry J. Draper. 

Ward 6 

William E. Westall, '88, 
Abbott Lawrence, '88. 
Albert Crowell. 
Frank Brown, '88. 



Clerk. 



President. 



136 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER 
18 9 0. 



MAYOR : 

CHARLES D. PALMER, '88, t '89. 
ALDERMEN: 

Albert D. Carter. John H. Fuller, *'89, Chairman, 

Watson A. Dickinson. Walter M. Sawyer, '85, J '86, '87, *'89. 

John E. Drury, '86, '87, *'89. Samuel E. Snow. 

Edmund D. Fletcher. Joseph M. Wilson, '79, '80, '84. 

Giraed P. Dadman, City Clerk. 



Ward 1. 
Joseph H. Callahan, '89. 
Daniel H. Courtney, '89. 
William J. Johnson, '89. 
Patrick J. Savage, '89. 

Ward 2. 
Newell Abare. 
Arthur H. Cluer, '89. 
Walter C. Coburn. 
James Stuart Murphy, '89. 

Ward 3. 

Patrick H. Brosnahan, '88, '89. 

Robert C. Gallagher. 

Charles L. Marren. 

Thomas J. Sparks, '84, '85, '86, 



COMMON COUNCIL: 

Ward 4. 

Edwards Cheney, '89. 
Frank Grav, '89. 
B. Frank Hale, '89. 
Alonzo G. Walsh, '88, '89, President 
Ward 5. 

Orford R. Blood, '75, '76, '89. 
Herbert M. Jacobs. 
Henry W. Ladd, '89. 
Louis P. Turcotte. 

Ward 6. 
Albert Crowell, '89. 
Daniel D. Driscoll. 
James Gookin. 
'88, '89. Edward F. Spalding. 



David Chase Clerk. 



189 1. 



MAYOR: 

GEORGE W. FIFIELD, *'83, * '84. 

ALDERMEN: 

Richard B. Allen, '86, '87. Thomas J. Enright, '85, '86. 

James W. Cassidy. George H. Frye. 

Jeremiah Crowlev, '70, 71', *73, *74, *77, Stephen B. Puffer, *77, *78, *'86, *'* 

*78, *'84, *'86, Chairman. George F. Tilton. 

Watson A. Dickinson, *'90. 

Michael J. Dowd, City Clerk. 



1. 



Ward 
Patrick H. Barry. 
Jh tries F. Doherty. 
John J. Sullivan. 
Peter F. Garrity. 

Ward 2 



COMMON COUNCIL: 

Ward 
Edwin L. Giles. 
Fred Home. 
Wallace G. Parkin. 
Eugene C. Wallace. 

Ward 



Newell Abare, '90. 
Auolphe Benard. 
Walter C. Coburn, '90. 
George H. Marston. 

Ward 3. 
Patrick J. Baxter. 
John J. Gilbride. 
Charles H. Marren, '90. 
Thomas J. Sparks, '84, '85, '86, '88, '89, 
't>0, President. 



Herbet M. Jacobs, '90. 
George D. Kimball. 
John A. Speirs. 
Louis P. Turcotte, '90. 

Ward & 
James A. Cawley. 
James J. Dolan. 
Daniel D. Driscoll, '90. 
James Gookin, '90. 



David Chase, Clerk. 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER 
1892. 



137 



MAYOR : 

GEORGE W. FIFIELD, *'83, *'84, t '91. 

ALDERMEN: 

Samuel D. Butterworth, *78, *'81, *'86. Stephen J. Johnson. 
James W. Cassidy, *'91. Freeman W. Puffer. 

William J. Coughlin. Frank E. Stowell. 

Albert A. Haggett, '68, '69, +70, *'71, Charles F. Varnum, 79, '80. 
*76, Chairman. 

Michael J. Dowd, City Clerk. 



Ward 1. 
John Brunette. 
James O'Neill, 
Joseph O'Rourke. 
John J. Sullivan, '91. 

Ward 2. 

Adolphe Benard, '91. 
George H. Marston, '91. 
Frank Scott. 
Hugh A. Thompson. 

Ward 3. 

Patrick J. Baxter, '91. 

John J. Gilbride, '91. 

Thomas J. Sparks, '84, '85, '86, '88, '89, 

'90, +'91, President. 
William H. Stafford. 

David Chase, Clerk 



COMMON COUNCIL 

Ward 4. 

Edwin L. Giles, '91. 
Fred Home, '91. 
Wallace G. Parkin, '91. 
Moses Wyman. 

Ward 5. 
Constant Henotte. 
Patrick H. Kehoe. 
Joseph A. McDonald. 
Charles W. Swan. 

Ward 6. 
William T. Benson, 79, '80. 
James J. Dolan, '91. 
Thomas F. Hoban. 
Michael F. McCarthy. 



18 93. 



MAYOR : 

JOHN J. PICKMAN, '76, '77. 
ALDERMEN : 

George R. Choate. Freeman W. Puffer, *'92. 

George C. Evans, '87. Stephen B. Puffer, *77, *78, *'86, *'87, 

Stephen J. Johnson, *'92. *'91. 

Elwyn W. Lovejoy, '85, '86. William E. Westall, '88, + '89, Chairman. 

Joseph A. McDonald, '92. 

Michael J. Dowd, City Clerk. 



Ward 1. 
John Brunette, '92. 
Patrick J. O'Brien. 
James O'Neil, '92. 
Fred H. Rourke. 

Ward 2. 

Charles H. Boisvert. 
Frank Scott, '92. 
Hugh A. Thompson, '92. 
George H. Tryder. 

Ward 3. 

Frank Dunlap. 

John J. Grady. 

John Joseph O'Connor. 

William H. Stafford, '92. 



COMMON COUNCIL: 

Ward 4. 
George E. Barclay. 
William J. Hills. 
Charles T. Killpartrick. 
Moses Wyman, '92. 

Ward 5. 

Cyrille Constantineau. 
Patrick J. Custy. 
Charles H. Noble. 
James O'Sullivan. 

Ward 6. 

William T. Benson, 79, '80, '92,Pre8. 
James J. Dolan, '91, '92. 
Thomas F. Hoban, '92. 
Anthony Robinson. 

Frank J. Simonds, Clerk. 



138 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER 
18 9 4. 



MAYOR : 

JOHN J. PICKMAN, '76, '77, t '93. 
ALDERMEN: 

Charles N. Bagley. Elwyn W. Lovejoy, '85, '86, *'93, Chair- 

Watson A. Dickinson, *'90, *'91. man. 

Frank Dunlap, '93. George E. Stanley, *76, *'77, *'85, *'86. 

Coolid^e R. Johnson. William E. Westall, '88, + '89, *'93. 

Stephen J. Johnson, *'92, *'93. 

Michael, J. Dowd, City Clerk. 



Ward 1. 
Matthew M. Mansfield. 
Patrick J. O'Brien, '93. 
Fred H. Rourke, '93. 
John J. Ryan. 

Ward 2. 
J. Henry Collins. 
John G. Gordon. 
Fred W. Sanborn. 
George H. Tryder, '93. 

Ward 3. 

Joseph H. Gormley. 
John J. O'Connell. 
John Joseph O'Connor, *93. 
Thomas J. Sparks, '84, '85, '86, '88, '89, 
'90, + '91, + '92, President. 



COMMON COUNCIL: 



Ward 4. 



George E. Barclay, '93. 
William L. Hills, '93. 
Charles T. Killpartrick, '93. 
Luther F. Kittredge. \ 

Ward 5. 

Patrick J. *asty, '93. 
Frederick E. Labarge. 
Charles H. Noble, '93. 
John Oliver. 

Ward 6. 

William T. Benson, '79, '80, '92, +'93, 

Died May 21,1894. 
William F. Curtin. 
Charles Riley. 
Anthony Robinson, '93. 
Thomas O'Day, Elected July 17, '94. 



Frank J. Simonds, Clerk. 



189 5. 



MAYOR : 

WILLIAM F. COURTNEY. 
ALDERMEN: 

Frank B. Dow. George H. Tryder, '93, '94. 

Frederic J. Flemings. Daniel H. Varnum, Chairman. 

William L. Hills, '93, '94. John C. Wilson. 

Charles E. Howe. Moses Wyman, '92, '93. 

Girard P. Dadmax, City Clerk. 



V 



Ward 1. 

Patrick H. Barry, '91. 
Thomas F. Garvey. 
Hugh Maguire, Jr., 
Matthew M. Mansfield. 

AVard 2. 
Edwin S. Eastman. 
William Hounsell. 
Willis E. Morse. 
Fred W. Sauborn, '94. 

Ward 3. 

Patrick F. Delehanty. 
Joseph H. Gormley, '94. 
James F. Miskella. 
Timothy J. Reynolds. 



CO 31 M ON COUNCIL: 

Ward 4. 
David Dickson. 
Edward T. Goward. 
Jonathan G. Hunton. 
Herbert E. Webster. 

Ward 5. 

Eugene E. Dennison. 
George W. Hartwell. 
John Oliver. 
Francis P. Rivet. 

Ward 6. 

William F. Curtin, '94, President. 
Thomas O'Dav, '94. 
Charles Riley, '94. 
John E. Sullivan. 

Frank J. Simond?, Clerk. 






MUNICIFAL REGISTER 

1896. 

MAYOR: 

WILLIAM F. COURTNEY, t '95. 
ALDERMEN: 

Jeremiah Crowley, 70, 71, *73, *74, John H. McAlvin. 



139' 



*77, *78, *'84, *'86, Chairman. 
Frank B. Dow, *'95. 
Frederic J. Flemings, *'95. 
Charles E. Howe, *'95. 



James A. Pevey. 

George H. Tryder, '93, '94, *'9«. 

Edward M. Tucke. 

John C. Wilson, *'95. 



Girard P. Dadman, City Clerk. 



COMMON COUNCIL: 

' Ward 1. 

William Hounsell, '95, ward 2. 
Jonathan G. Hunton, '95, ward 4. 
Homer B. Nay. 

Ward 2. 

William J. Dunn. 

Hugh Maguire, Jr., '95, ward 1. 

Dennis J. Pendergast. 

Ward 3. 

David Dickson, '95, ward 4. 
Frank H. Hallett. 

Herbert M. Jacobs, '90, '91, ward 5. 
Ward 4. 

James F. Miskella, 95, ward 3. 

Stephen O'Hare. 

Timothy J. Reynolds, '95, ward 3. 



Charles A. Eveleth. 



Ward 5. 

John P. O'Hare. 

John E. Sullivan, '95, ward 6. 

Charles E. Thornton. 

Ward 6. 

William E. Badger. 
Sidney Drewett. 
Edwin S. Eastman. 

Ward 7. 
George W. Hartwell, '95, ward 5. 
Francis P. Rivet, '95, ward 5. 
Lorenzo E. Smith. 

Ward 8. 

Fred A. George. 

William H. Perm. 

Herbert E. Webster, '95, ward 4, Pie8% 

Ward S. 

Henry K. White. 



Carl G. A. F. W. E. Pihl. 
Frank N. Owen, Clerk. 

1897. 



MAYOR : 

WILLIAM F. COURTNEY, f '95, t '96. 

ALDERMEN : 

Charles H. Cosgrove. Charles E. Howe, *'95, *'96, Chairman. 

Lucius A. Derby. Abbott Lawrence, '88, '89» 

Edwin S. Eastman, '95, '96. Edward B. Pierce, £79, '80, +'83, '84. 

Edward T. Goward, '95« Fred A. Tuttle. 

George L. Hooper. 

Girard P. Dadman, City Clerk. 



Ward 1. 
Anadore B. Bosca. 
Clarence W. Dana. 
Samuel Scott. 

Ward 2. 
William J. Dunn, '96. 
James Kennedy. 
Dennis J. Pendergast, '96. 

Ward 3. 
William H. Brown. 
James Smith. 
Oliver D. Wilder. 

Ward 4. 
Francis M. Facran. 
James F. Miskella. '95, '96 
Stephen O'Hare, '96. 



COMMON COUNCIL: 

Ward 5. 
George Farley. 
Michael E. Sullivan. 
Charles E. Thornton, '96. 

Ward 6. 
John H. Beaulieu. 
Walter F. Leighton. 
George H. Taylor. 

Ward 7. 
Clovis Belanger. 
Lorenzo E. Smith, '96. 
Lincoln R. Welch. 

Ward 8. 
Arthur W. Lang. 
Charles F. Libby. 
William H. Penn, '96, President 

Ward 9. 

Butler Ames. Louis B. Sykes. 

Henry K. White, '96. 

Frank N. Owen, Clerk. 



14-0 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER 
1 8 9 8. 



MAY OK: 

JAMES W. BENNETT, '76, '77. 

ALDERMEN : 

Charles H. Cosgrove, *'97. Oliver A. Libby. 

Lucius A. Derby, *'97. Edward B. Peirce, +'79, '80, J'83, '84, *»97. 

Charles A. R. Dimon, *'79, Chairman. Francis P. Rivet, '95, '96. 

Edward T. Goward, '95, *'97. Fred A. Tuttle, *'97. 

Guy Holbrook. 

Girard P. Dadman, City Clerk. 



Ward l. 
Anadore B. Bosca, '97. 
Clarence W. Dana, '97. 
Charles D. Paige. 

Ward 2. 

Thomas F. Garvey, '95. 

James Kennedy, '97. 
Frank McMahon. 

Ward 3. 

James Smith, '07. 
Burton H. Wigsin. 
Oliver D. Wilder, '97. 

Ward 4. 



COMMON COUNCIL: 

Ward 5. 

George A. Farley, '97. 
William J. McCluskey. 
Michael Sullivan, '97. 

Ward 6. 

John H. Beaulieu, '97. 
Walter F. Leighton, '97. 
George H. Taylor, '97, President. 
Ward 7. 

Alfred J. Howe. 
Charles H. Merrill. 
Eben B. Stafford. 

Ward 8. 



Francis M. Fagan, '97 
Michael J. Markhain. 
John J. Roark. 



Arthur W. Lang, '97. 
Charles F. Libby, '97. 
Anthony D. Mitten. 

Ward 9. 

Walter E. Murkland. Louis B. Sykes, '97. 

William D. Whittet. 

Frank M. Dowling, Clerk. 



18 9 9. 



MAYOR : 

JEREMIAH CROWLEY, '70, '71, *'73, *'74, *'77, *'78, *»84, *'86, *>91, *>96 

ALDERMEN : 



Sam Chapin. 

Lucius A. Derby, *'97, *'98. 
Charles A. R. Dimon, *'79, *'98. 
Oliver A. Libby, *'98. 
Philip McNulty. 

Girard P. Dadman, City Clerk 



James F. Miskella, '95, '96, '97. 

Edward B. Peirce, +'79, '80, J'88, '84, *'97, *'9& 

George H. Tavlor, '97, +'98. 

Oliver D. Wilder, '97, '98. 



COMMON COlINC:i: 



Ward 1. 

Herbert R. Baker. 

Charles D. Paige, '98, President. 

Francis E. Saunders. 

Ward 2. 

Patrick H. Barry, '91, '95. 
Frank McMahon, '98. 
John J. Mullaney. 

Ward 3. 

William H. Brown. 
Chas. H. Flanders. 
Burton H. Wiggin, '98. 

Ward 4. 

Timothy F. Donohoe. 
Michael J. Markham, '98. 
John J. Roark, '98. 



Frank S. Clark. 
John F. Dillon. 
John J. O'Brien. 



Ward 5. 



Ward 6. 



William E. Badger, '9^. 
George E. Burns. 
James F. Walker. 

Ward 7. 
Philip Desmarais. 
Lewis Lebrun. 
Eben B. Stafford, '98. 

Ward 8. 

Fred E. Bean. 
Ralph B. Lyman. 
Anthony D. Mitten, '98. 

Ward 9. 
Henry Hatch. Walter E. Murkland, '98. 

William D. Whittet, '98. 
Frank M. Dowling, Clerk. 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER 

1000. 

MAYOR. 

JEREMIAH CROWLEY, '70, '71, **73, *'74, *'77, *'78, *'84, *'86, *'91,*'96, t'99. 



i 4 r 



William E. Badger, '96, 99. 
Cyrus Barton. 
John H. Beaulieu, '97, '98. 
William H. Brown, '99. 
James H. Carmichael, $'87. 



ALDERMEN. 

Edward S. Howe. 

Charles D. Paige, '98, $'99. 

George H. Taylor, '97, $'98, *'99, Chairman, 

William D. Whittet, '98, '99. 

Girard P. Dadman, City Clerk. 



Ward 1. 

Herbert R. Baker, '99. 
James G. Hill. 
Francis E. Saunders, '99. 
Ward 2. 

Patrick H. Barry, '91, '95, '99. 
Bernard F. Lee. 
John J. Mullaney, '99. 

Ward 3. 

Otto Jensen. 

Ephraim D. Livingston. 

George McElroy. 

Ward 4. 

James B. Casey. 
Timothy F. Donohoe, '99. 
Michael J. Markham, '98, '99. 



COMMON COUNCIL. 

Ward 5. 

T. Prank Clark. 
John F. Dillon, '99. 
Thomas J. McCaffrey. 

Ward 6. 

Pierre A. Brousseau, '88, '89. 
George E. Burns, '99. 
James F. Walker, '99, President. 
Ward 7. 

Alfred J. Howe, '98. 
Louis Lebrun, '99. 
Eben B. Stafford, '98, '99. 

Ward 8. 
Fred E. Bean, '99. 
Anthony D. Mitten, '98, '99. 
Charles E. Tilton. 
Ward 9. 

George Emsley. Henry Hatch, '99. 

Daniel N. Pickering. 

Frank M. Dowling, Clerk. 



1901. 

MAYOR. 
CHARLES A. R. DIMON, -'79, *'98, *'99. 



William E. Badger, '96, '99, *1900. 
James H. Carmichael $'87, *1900. 
Patrick Conlon, '8?. 
Philip Desmarais, '99. 
Richard J. McCluskey. 

Girard P. Dadman, City Clerk 



ALDERMEN 

James F. Miskella, '95, '96, '97,*'99, Chairman, 
Joseph Mullin. 
Gardner W. Pearson. 
John J. Sullivan, '91, '92. 



COMMON COUNCIL. 
Ward l. Wabd 5. 

Herbert R. Baker, '99, 1900. T. Frank Clark, 1900. 

James G. Hill ,1900. Elected Pres. July 2, 1901. Thomas J. McCaffrey, 1900. 



Mark D. Taylor. 

Ward 2. 

Peter Daley. 
Patrick J. O'Rourke. 
John H. Spillane. Died April 16. 
John J. Pinder. Elected June 4. 
Ward 3. 

Otto Jensen, 1900. 

Ephraim D. Livingston, 1900. 

George McElroy, 1900. 

Ward 4. 

James B. Casey, 1900. 
Timothy Donohoe, '99, 1900. 
Michael J. Markham, '98, '99, 1900. 



Charles H. Clough. 



George B. Roche. 

Ward 6. 

Pierre A. Brousseau, '88, '88, 2988, Pft6ftt8Bt> 

Resigned July 2, 1901. 
John A. Henderson. 
Harry Swann. 

Wabd 7. 

Louis Lebrun, '99, 1900. 
Joseph A. Legare. 
Albert S. Park. 

WABD& 

James P. Dugdale. 
Albert F. Grant. 
Charles E. Tilton, 1908. ' 
Ward 9. 

George Bmaltf , ' 
Frank G. Lundberg. 

Frank M. Dowling. Clerk. 



142 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER 
1902. 



MAYOR. 

CHARLES A. R. DIMON,*' 7 9, *'o8, *'gg. t 01. (Died May 21, igoa.) 
WILLIAM E. BADGER, (Acting Mayor.) 
ALDERMEN. 

William E. Badger, '96, '99, *'oo, *'oi, Chairman. Lucius A. Derby, *'97, **98, *'99. 
Cyrus Barton, *'oo. Char.es H. Moiloy. 

William H. Brown, '99, *'oo. James O'Sullivan, '93. 

George E. Burns, '99, '00. George F. Stiles. 

James H. Carmichael, t '87, *'oo, *'oi. 

Girard P. Dadman, City Clerk. 



Ward i. 

Cecil L. Adams. 

James G. Hill, '00, '01, President. 

Mark D. Taylor, '01. 

Wa*rd 2. 
Frederick Cror.an. 
Peter Daley, 'oi. 
John J. Pinder, '01. 

Ward 3. 
Asa B. Hilliard. 
Thomas G. Little. 
Charles H. Worcester. 

Ward 4. 
James B. Casey, '00, '01. 
Timothy Donohoe, '99, '00, '01. 
Patrick F. Welch. 

William G. Brown. 



COMMON COUNCIL. 

Ward 5. 
John F. Dillon, '99. '00. 
Hugh Finner^y. 
George B. Roche, '01 

Ward 6; 

John A. Henderson, '01. 
Elie C. Laporte 
Harry Swan, '01. 

Ward 7. 
Edmond P. Fontaine. 
Joseph A. Legare, '01. 
Albert S. Park, »oi. 

Ward 8. 

William Fairweather 
Albert F. Grant, '01. . 
Hamlet S. Greenwood. 

Ward 9. 
Daniel N. Pickering, '00. 

Frank M. Dowling, Clerk. 



John S. Palm. 



1903. 



MAYOR. 

CHARLES E. HOWE, *' 95 , 
ALDERMEN. 



'96, *' 97 



George E. Burns, '99, '00, *'o2 

James B. Casey, '00, '01. 

Lucius A. Derby, *'97, *'98, *'99,*'o2. 

James J. Gallagher. 

David Gerow. 

Girard P. Dadman, City Clerk. 



James G. Hill, 'oo ; '01, $'02. 

Richard J. McCluskey, *'oi. 

James F. Miskella, '95, '96, '97, *'99, *'oi, Chn. 

Charles H. Moiloy, *'o2. 



Ward i. 
Cecil L. Adams", '02, President. 
James W. Barry. 
James J. Hayes. 

Ward 2. 
Thomas J. Conners, 
Frederick Gronan, '02. 
John J. Pinder, '01, '02. 

Ward 3. 
Thomas H. Braden. 
Asa B. Hilliard, '02. 
Charles H Worcester, '02. 

Ward 4. 
Dennis J. Cooney. 
Timothy Donohoe, '99, '00, '01, 
Patrick F. Welch^ '02. 

William G. 



COMMON COUNCIL. 

Ward 5. 
Hugh Finnerty, '02' 
Frank A. McLaughlin. 
George B. Roche, '01, '02. 

Ward 6. 
Frederick G. Baldwin. 
Samuel Fleming. 
C. Fred Hard. 

Ward 7. 
Edmond P. Fontaine, '02. 
William J. Hayes 
Andrew Livingston. 

Ward 8. 

William H. Dodge. 
'02. William Fairweather, '02. 

Hamlet S. Greenwood, '02. 

Ward 9. 

Brown, '02. John W. Daly. 

John S. Palm, '02. 
Frank M. Dowling, Clerk. 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER 
1904. 



1 43 



MAYOR. 

CHARLES E. HOWE, * '95, * '96, * '97, t '03. 
ALDERMEN. 

Tames H. Carmichael, % '87, *'oo, *'oi, *'o2. James G. Hill, 'oo, 



William Fairweather, '02, '03. 
James J. Gallagher, *'o3. 
David Gerow, * '03. 
Albert F. Grant, '01, '02. 



Ward i. 



03- 



James F. Miskella, '95, '96, '97, * '99, * '01, *'o 3 

[Chairman. 
Albion C. Taylor. 
William H. Wilson. 



Girard P. Dadman, City Clerk. 



COMMON COUNCIL. 



James W. Barry, '03. 
James H. Fleming. 
James J. Hayes, '03. 

Ward 2. 

Thomas J. Connors, '03. 
Frederick Cronan, '02, '03. 
Michael J. Quinn. 

Ward 3. 

Thomas H. Braden, '03, President. 

Edmund J*. Cheney. 

Charles H. Worcester, '02, '03. 

Ward 4. 

Daniel Cosgrove. 
John P. Mahohey. 
Patrick F. Welch, '02, '03. 



Burton H. Crosby 



Ward 5. 
John Donohue. 
Andrew McAloon, 
Frank A. McLaughlin. '03 

Ward 6. 
Frederick G. Baldwin, '03. 
John H. Blake. 
Samuel Fleming, '03. 

Ward 7. 
William J. Hayes, '03. 
Charles H. May. 
William G. Mclntyre. 

Ward 8. 
William H Dodge, '03. 
Solomon S. Mayberry. 
George W. Peterson. 



Ward 9. 



Charles W. Stott. 
Frank M. Dowling, Clerk 



John S. Palm, '02, '03. 



SEVENTY-NINTH ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



School Committee 



OF THE 



CITY OF LOWELL, MASS. 



AND THE 



FORTY-FIRST ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Superintendent of Public Schools 



1904 



LOWELL, MASS. 

BUTTERFIELD PRINTING COMPANY. 
I905 



CITY OF LOWELL 



Office of the School Committee, 

Lowell, Mass., January 2, 1905. 

At a meeting of the School Committee, held January 2, 1905, it was voted 
that the Committee on Reports and the Superintendent of Schools have leave to 
print their annual reports for the year 1904, 

In accordance with this vote the reports are herewith submitted. 

A. K. WHITCOMB, Secretary. 



ORGANIZATION 



OF THE 



School Committee 



1904 



WILLIAM W. DUNCAN, President. 
ARTHUR K. WHITCOMB, Secretary. 



Ward 1— WILLIAM W. DUNCAN, 56 Hildreth Bldg. 

" .2— JOHN J, HANLON, 169 Broadway 

" 3— OTIS ALLEN, 226 Meirimack St. 

" 4—WILLIAM F. REGAN, 79 Kinsman St, 

" 5— DENNIS J. MURPHY, 33 Tyler St. 

" 6— JOSEPH N. MARSTON, Runels Bldg. 

« 7— ANDREW G. SWAPP, 307 Pawtucket St. 

" 8— CHARLES W. TAYLOR, 17 Kirk St. 

" 9— HUGH WALKER, 3 Wyman's Exchange 



Term expires 1905 

1905 
1904 

1905 
1904 
1904 

1905 
1904 

1905 



4 ORGANIZATION OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE, 1904 

STANDING COMMITTEES 

On Teachers and Salaries — Messrs. Swapp, Duncan, Murphy. 

On Books and Supplies — Messrs. Marston, Taylor, Allen, Regan, Walker. 

On Evening Schools — Messrs. Allen, Swapp, Marston, Taylor, Hanlon. 

On High School — Messrs. Duncan, Swapp, Marston, Murphy, Regan. 

On Evening Drawing Schools — Messrs. Taylor, Duncan, Hanlon. 

On Music — Messrs. Murphy, Allen, Walker. 

On Reports and Printing — Messrs. Hanlon, Regan, Allen. 

On Accounts — Messrs. Taylor, Duncan, Walker: 

On School Houses and Hygiene — Messrs. Walker, Hanlon, Marston. 

On Rules — Messrs. Regan, Murphy, Swapp. 



ASSIGNMENT OF SCHOOLS 

Mr. Duncan — High, Edson, Kirk street, Cottage street. 

Mr. Hanlon — Green, Worthen street, Cheever street, Morrill, Worthen 
street Kindergarten. 

Mr. Allen — Lincoln, Howard street, Grand street, Plain street, Lincoln and 
Plain street Kindergartens. 

Mr. Regan — High, Butler, London street, Weed street, Agawam street, Carter 
street, Lyon street, Agawam street and Chapel street Kindergartens. 

Mr. Murphy — High, Charles street, Central street, Ames street, Fayette 
street, Charles street Kindergarten. 

Mr. 'Marston — High, Varnum, West Sixth street, Tenth street, Lakeview 
Avenue, Billings street, Varnum Kindergarten. 

Mr. Swapp — High, Bartlett, Pawtucket, Training, Cross street, Cabot street, 
New Moody street, Lexington Avenue, Pawtucket, and Bartlett 
Kindergartens. 

Mr. Taylor — Highland, Franklin, Dover street, Powell street, Pine street, 
Middlesex Village, Franklin, Dover and Pine street Kindergartens. 

Mr. Walker — Moody, Pond street, High street, Sycamore street, Moody 
Kindergarten. 



ASSIGNMENT OF EVENING SCHOOLS 

Mr. Allen — High, Edson, Howard street. 

Mr. Swapp — Bartlett, Green, Pawtucket, Cheever. 

Mr. Marston — Varnum, Aiken avenue, Colburn, Old Moody. 

Mr. Taylor — Mann, Worthen. 

Mr. Hanlon — Butler, Franklin. 



ARTHUR K. WHITCOMB, Superintendent of Public Schools. 
Office in City Hall. 

Office Hours — One hour after the forenoon session of schools, and from 
2 to 3 o'clock on Saturday afternoon. Telephone 566-4. 



School Supply Room. 

Open 8 a. m. to 12,30 p. m., and 1 to 5 p. m. 

Telephone 506-2. 



/ 



TRUANT COMMISSIONERS 

GEO. F. STURTEVANT, JAMES KELLY, WM, F. THORNTON, 

CAMILLE ROUSSIN. 

Office in City Hall, Third Floor. 

Office Hours — Saturday, 2 to 3 o'clock p. m. Other days, 4 to 5 o'clock 
p. m., except during the summer vacation, when the office will be open from 9 
to 10 o'clock a. m. 



ORGANIZATION 



OF THE 



School Committee 



1905 



WILLIAM W. DUNCAN, President. 
ARTHUR K. WHITCOMB, Secretary. 



Ward 1— WILLIAM W. DUNCAN, 21 Hildreth Bldg. 

" 2— JOHN J, HANLON, 1(69 Broadway 

" 3— ANDREW S. WOOD, 598 School St. 

" 4— WILLIAM F. REGAN, 79 Kinsman St. 

" 5— EUGENE C. QUEENAN, 54 Pond St. 

" 6— HARRY SWANN, 94 Beech St. 

" 7— ANDREW G. SWAPP, 307 Pawtucket St. 

" 8— CHARLES W. TAYLOR, M. D., 17 Kirk St. 

" 9— HUGH WALKER, D. D. S., 3 Wyman's Exchange 



Term expires 1905 

1905 
1906 

!905 
1906 
1906 

1905 
1906 

i9°5 



8 ORGANIZATION OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE, I905 

STANDING COMMITTEES 

On Teachers and Salaries — Messrs. Swapp, Duncan, Regan. 

On Books and Supplies — Messrs. Hanlon, Taylor, Swann, Wood, Walker. 

On Evening Schools — Messrs. Wood, Swapp, Taylor, Swann, Hanlon. • 

On High School — Messrs. Duncan, Swapp, Taylor, Queenan, Regan. 

On Evening Drawing Schools — Messrs. Taylor, Duncan, Walker. 

On Music — Messrs, Queenan, Wood, Hanlon. 

On Reports and Private Schools — Messrs. Walker, Wood, Hanlon. 

On Accounts, — Messrs. Swann, Duncan, Queenan. 

On School Houses and Hygiene — Messrs. Walker, Regan, Swann. 

On Rules — Messrs. Regan, Queenan, Swapp. 



ASSIGNMENT OF SCHOOLS 

Mr. Duncan — High, Edson, Kirk street, Cottage street. 

Mr. Hanlon — Green, Worthen street, Cheever street, Morrill, Morrill 
Kindergarten. 

Mr. Wood — Lincoln, Howard street, Grand street, Plain street, Lincoln and 
Plain street Kindergartens. 

Mr. Regan — High, Butler, London street, Weed street, Agawam street, Carter 
street, Lyon street, Agawam street and Chapel street Kindergartens. 

Mr. Queenan — High, Charles street, Central street, Ames street, Fayette 
street, Charles street Kindergarten. 

Mr. Swann — Varnum, West Sixth street, Tenth street, Lakeview Avenue, 
Billings street, Varnum Kindergarten. 

Mr. Swapp — High, Bartlett, Pawtucket, Training, Cross street, Cabot street, 
New Moody street, Lexington Avenue, Pawtucket and Bartlett 
Kindergartens. 

Mr. Taylor — High, Highland, Franklin, Dover street, Powell street, Pine 
street, Middlesex Village, Franklin, Dover and Pine street Kinder- 
gartens. 

Mr. Walker — Moody. Pond street, High street, Sycamore street, Moody 
Kindergarten. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE, 1905 

ASSIGNMENT OF EVENING SCHOOLS 

Mr. Wood — High, Edson, Railroad street. 

Mr. Swapp — Bartlett, Green, Cheever, Pawtucket. 

Mr. Swann — Varnum, Aiken avenue, Old Moody, Colburn. 

Mr. Taylor — Mann, Worthen street. 

Mr. Hanlon — Butler, Franklin. 



ARTHUR K. WHITCOMB, Superintendent of Public Schools. 

Office in City Hall. 

Office Hours — One hour after the forenoon session of schools and from 2 to 
3 o'clock on Saturday afternoon. Telephone 566-4. 

School Supply Room. 

Open 8 a. m. to 12.30 p. m. and 1 to 5 p. m. Telephone 506-2. 



TRUANT COMMISSIONERS 

GEO. F. STURTEVANT, JAMES KELLY, WM. F. THORNTON, 

CAMILLE ROUSSIN. 

Office in City Hall, Third Floor. 

Office Hours — Saturday, 2 to 3 o'clock p. m. Other days, 4 to 5 o'clock 
p. m., except during the summer vacation, when the office will be open from 
9 to 10 o'clock a. m. 



REGULAR MEETINGS OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

January 31. February 28. March 28. April 25. 

May 31. June 27. July 25. August 29. 

September 26. October 31. November 28. December 26. 



REPORTS 



Report of the School Committee 



Gentlemen of the Board : 

The law which imposes upon school committees the 
duty of making- annually a full report upon the condition 
of the schools is a very old one, and in our opinion a 
very good one. The children and youth of a city are 
beyond all comparison its most important possession, 
and the schools in which these children are being edu- 
cated are, or ought to be, a matter of the greatest in- 
terest to every citizen. The public, therefore, has a 
right to a report on the work of the year, and on present 
conditions, as full and as frank as can be made. To 
meet these requirements as fully and as frankly as pos- 
sible is certainly the wish of the present committee. 

Before the appointment of superintendents of schools 
(that is, so far as Lowell is concerned, until within the 
last forty years), the duty of attending to all details, 
collecting all statistics, and writing the whole report, 
rested on the members of the committee ; but in more 
recent years the larger part of this work has very prop- 
erly been turned over to the Superintendent. In most 
cities, indeed, if we may judge from the reports we have 



14 SCHOOL COMMITTEE S REPORT. 

examined, the committee has retired from the report- 
making business altogether, and has satisfied the statu- 
tory requirement by simply adopting as its own the 
report of the Superintendent. This has, indeed, been 
done in Lowell once or twice, the committee on reports 
only taking the space required to refer readers to the 
fuller report of the Superintendent, but generally com- 
mittees have had something of their own to say, and 
have said it well. 

Financial conditions, for instance, were discussed 
by the committee on reports in 1901 in considerable de- 
tail, and with a clearness which left nothing to be misun- 
derstood by any one who would give the report fair 
consideration. The need of new school houses has been 
emphasized by nearly all committees in recent years, 
and that only real needs were presented is well shown 
by the makeshift structures now adorning the yards of 
the Lakeviev Avenue and Highland schools. The com- 
mittee of 1899 asked that janitors of school buildings be 
placed in the charge of the school committee ; a change 
which would undoubtedly be for the good of both jani- 
tors and schools, whatever might be its effect upon the 
committee, and the report of 1903 spoke what was be- 
lieved to be the final word on the subjects of penmanship 
and music. 

Of this custom of Lowell committees in the past 
the present committee on reports desires to express its 
unqualified approval. However full and excellent the 
report of the Superintendent may be, there are often 



SCHOOL COMMITTEES REPORT. 1 5 

subjects to be discussed on which the committee can 
speak more appropriately than anyone else. This is not 
to suggest the possibility of differences of opinion be- 
tween the Superintendent and the committee. If we 
assume that the former says neither more nor less than 
just what should be said, there would still be left topics 
on which the committee could speak with an authority 
which the Superintendent does not possess, and on these, 
vigorous and pointed opinions are greatly to be com- 
mended. 

The work of the school committee in the past year, 
and, indeed, in all recent years, has been very pleasant 
in that mutual courtesy and kindly consideration has 
prevailed between members, and honest differences of 
opinion have been so harmonized by informal discussion 
that minority reports of standing committees have been 
unknown, and the action of the full board has been 
unanimous on all matters of importance during the year, 
except, perhaps, the question of increase of salaries in 
June. On this all members were agreed in wishing that 
it were possible to make many advances, but they dif- 
fered on the way or place in which an increase should 
be made. The result was a report from the committee 
on salaries recommending that all salaries remain as be- 
fore except a few rewards of long service in the High 
School, and that the report was accepted by a large ma- 
jority, though not by a unanimous vote. That a committee 
so diverse in its personality, representing nine different 
wards, and divided almost equally between two great 



1 6 school committee's report. 

political parties, should be able to have so nearly unani- 
mous action through the year certainly speaks well for 
the spirit of fairness which has actuated all its members, 
and ought to be a strong recommendation to the confi- 
dence of the public. 

We note with regret that the term of office of three 
members has expired, and that, not having been candi- 
dates for re-election, their membership in the committee 
ends with the year. Mr. Murphy has served six years, 
Dr. Marston four, and Dr. Allen two. All have been 
intelligent and active public servants, and all deserve the 
thanks of the public for their services. Members of the 
School Committee receive no pay, and the work they do 
is much greater than is generally supposed. The board 
has a regular meeting each month, in addition to special 
meetings which may be called at any time, and there are 
also at least fifty meetings of standing committees to be 
attended. Schools are to be visited, conferences with 
the Superintendent, with parents, and with teachers are 
frequent, and altogether the amount of time given to 
the work is very considerable. That men are willing to 
give so much of their time, and to face the possibility of 
loss through fidelity to duty, is certainly a matter of 
commendation, which comes all too rarely. 

The schools of the city are all, so far as we know, 
in good condition and doing good work. To the teach- 
ers the thanks of the committee, and the public, are due 
for a zeal, a fidelity, and a success, which are almost uni- 
versal. For statistics of the work done, discussion of 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE'S REPORT. 1 7 

present conditions, and suggestions for future action, 
see the report of the Superintendent. 



Respectfully submitted. 



JOHN J. HANLON. 
WM. F. REGAN. 
OTIS ALLEN. 



REPORT OF THE 

Superintendent of Schools. 



Office of the Superintendent of Schools, 
December 31, 1904. 

Gentlemen of the School Committee : 

In accordance with your rules, I have the honor to 
submit the following as my report for the year 1904: 

SUMMARY OF STATISTICS. 

Value of real and personal property $71,614,907 

Population by census of 1900 94,969 

Number of polls 25,555 

Increase for the year 996 

Number of children between five and fifteen years of 

age, September 1, 1904 14,290 

Ward One, 876 Ward Six, 2010 

11 Two, 1059 " Seven, 2859 

Three, 1407 " Eight, 1724 

Four, 161 2 " Nine, 1640 
Five, 1 103 



< 1 



1 < 



20 SUPERINTENDENT S REPORT. 

/ 

Number of public schools 59 

One High, nine Grammar, thirty-three Primary, 
two Mixed, one Training, thirteen Kindergartens. 

Number of public school buildings 53 

Number of school rooms in actual use 286 

High 34 ; Grammar, 117 ; Primary, 117; Mixed, 
4 ; Kindergarten, 14. 

Number of elected teachers December 31, 1904 307 

Absent on leave, 2 ; in actual service 305 

High School, nine men, twenty-four women. 

Grammar Schools, nine men, one hundred seven 
women. 

Primary schools, one hundred eleven women. 

Training School, ten women. 

Mixed Schools, three women. 

Kindergartens, twenty-five women. 

One supervisor of kindergartens. 

Two teachers of drawing. 

Two teachers of music. 

One teacher of sewing. 

One military instructor. 

Number of teachers of Evening Schools, term of 

i903-'o4 • 192 

Whole number enrolled in Evening Schools, term 

I 9°3-'o4 4826 

Whole number enrolled in Day Schools 12,223 



SUPERINTENDENT S REPORT. 21 

Average number belonging to Day Schools 10,401 

High, 890 ; Grammar, 4539 ; Primary, 4406 ; 
Mixed, 120 ; Kindergarten, 436. 

Average attendance 9479 

High, 847 ; Grammar, 4226 ; Primary, 3941 ; 
Mixed, 121 ; Kindergartens, 344. 

Average number belonging to each teacher 34 

High, 28 ; Grammar, 36 ; Primary, 37 ; Mixed, 
33 ; Kindergarten, 17. 

Average belonging to each room 37 

High 26 ; Grammar, 39 ; Primary, 38 ; Mixed, 
33 ; Kindergarten, 31. 

Average per cent, of attendance 91 

High, 95 ; Grammar, 93 ; Primary, 89 ; Mixed, 
93 ; Kindergarten, 79. 

Average cost of each pupil, for .tuition only, based on 

the average number belonging $20.84 

High, $39.19; Grammar, $19.35 I Primary and 
Mixed, $16.35 ; Kindergartens, $28.65. 



22 SUPERINTENDENT S REPORT. 

RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES. 

RECEIPTS. 

Appropriated and assessed in 1904 $300,000.00 

EXPENDITURES. 

Paid to teachers of day schools : — 

High School $ 34,883.35 

Grammar Schools — Bartlett School, $ 8,574.18 

Butler " 12,663.88 

Edson " 8,633.08 

Green " 8,438.69 

Highland " 11,818.06 

A.Lincoln " 7,718.58 

Moody " 6,957.15 

Pawtucket" 5,699.77 

Varnum il 12,116.37 

82,619.76 

Primary and Mixed Schools 71,246.47 

Training School 11,451.81 

Kindergartens 12,493.50 

Special Teachers 4,085.00 

Total paid for instruction in day schools, 216,779.89 

Evening Schools ; — 

Teachers $15,808.00 

Janitors 1,902.75 

17,7*0.75 

Drawing Schools : — 

Teachers $3,922,00 

Janitor 87.00 

4,009.00 

Amount carried forward $238,499.64 



SUPERINTENDENT S REPORT 23 

Amount brought forward $238,499.64 

Cost of supervision : — 

Salary of Superintendent of Schools $3,000.00 

Office Assistant '. 540.00 

Truant officers ( four ) 4,100.00 

Assistant in supply room 599. 00 

$8,239.00 

Total of Salaries $246,738.64 

Fuel $20,491.94 

Water 1,195.11 

Gas for day schools 475*53 

Gas for evening schools 892.53 

Bills of Superintendent of Public Build- 
ings for repairs 1,801.39 

Repairs, furniture, curtains, etc 1,071.47 

Electrical repairs and maintenance. ... 851. 12 

Text books 5>939-69 

Writing and drawing books, etc 4,632.26 

Supplementary reading 2,215.07 

Bills of Middlesex County, board of 

truants 2,794.62 

Manual training equipment, etc 431.41 

Printing, including annual report .... 1,695.21 

Kindergarten equipment and supplies . 418.29 

Supplies, Manual Training School .... 129. 10 

Janitors' supplies 1,490.05 

Amounts carried forward $46,424.79 $246,738.64 



24 SUPERINTENDENT S REPORT 

Amounts brought forward $46,524.79 $246,738.64 

Board of horses, repairs of wagons, etc. . 935-32 

Power for ventilating purposes 1,612.21 

Electric lighting 79 I -37 

Material for sewing classes 269.35 

Apparatus for High School 1 ^>SA1 

High School Regiment 325.50 

Graduations 389. 13 

Rent of Room and Land 341.00 

Equipment of Commercial Dept 294.70 

Miscellaneous 1,125.31 

Total of bills $52,794. 15 

Total expenditures $299,532.79 

Balance to Treasury Fund 467.21 

SCHOOL HOUSES 

RECEIPTS 

Appropriated and assessed $66,750.58 

Received from other sources 2,239.45 

Total 68,990.03 

EXPENDITURES 

Janitors . 40,606.73 

General Repairs and Labor 28,383.30 

Total 68,990.03 



Temporary house in Highland school yard 

Appropriation $2,700.00 

Expenditures 2,699.57 



Returned to Treasury Fund .43 



SUPERINTENDENT S REPORT. 25 



SCHOOL CENSUS AND ATTENDANCE 

The number of children between five and fifteen years of age 
in the city in September last, as shown by the census, was 
14,290, a number differing but slightly from that of last year. 
The polls, after falling off 2021 in the three years ending with 
1903, showed an increase of 996 in 1904, and a similar increase 
in the number of children of school age was anticipated, but did 
not occur. The reason why it did not is probably found in the 
changed personnel of our immigration. The natives of central and 
western Europe and of Canada who have until recently formed the 
mass of new arrivals have usually had families of good size, and an 
increase in the number of men meant an equal or greater increase 
in the number of children. The Greeks and other peoples from 
southeastern Europe and from Asia, however, who have been 
coming to us so rapidly in recent years, rarely have children with 
them, or at least children not old enough to work in the mills, and 
there is therefore a much more rapid increase of adult population 
than of children. 

The average number of children belonging to the schools in 
the school year ending in June, 1904, as stated in the foregoing 
tables of statistics, was 10,401, and the average attendance 9,479, 
an increase over the previous year, small it is true, only 71 in 
number attending, but yet gratifying when made in the face of an 
actual decrease in the number of children in the city. The opening 
of the schools for a new school year last September showed a still 
further gain in number belonging, from 10,373 m I 9 3> to 10,666 
in 1904, an increase of 293. 



26 superintendent's report. 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 

The expenditures of the school department in 1904, 
$299,532.79, were less than in IQ03 by $12,989.95. In salaries 
there was an increase of $2,813.22, an increase due in part to 
higher salaries for a few teachers, and in part to an increase in the 
number of teachers employed, but this was much more than offset 
by the decrease in the cost of fuel from $34,871.04 in 1903 to 
$20,491.94 in 1904, a gain of $14,379. 10. 

In the preceding tables the salaries of teachers and janitors of 
evening school's are given separately, but no attempt is made to 
separate other expenses of the evening schools from those of the 
day schools. It would, indeed, be very difficult to do this with 
absolute accuracy. Most evening schools are kept in houses which 
are used in the day time for day schools; the coal for heating is 
taken from the same bin for both, and gas for lighting is drawn 
through the same meter. The charge of $791.37 for electric 
lighting is mainly for evening schools, but not wholly. Books and 
supplies are purchased in wholesale quantities as far as possible, in 
order to get the advantage of wholesale rates in prices, and are 
distributed to schools as needed. Our system of bookkeeping, 
however, makes it a matter of no great difficulty to find the cost of 
supplies sent to any class of schools, or to any individual school for 
that matter, so that an accurate separation here is possible, and 
when made it shows expenses for evening schools alone to be as 
follows: Text books, $521.88; writing books, $298.99; other 
supplies $214,47, an d a close approximation of the cost of fuel and 
light is $625.61 for the former and $1600 for the latter, a total of 
$3,261.95, or, including salaries as previously noted, $21,719.75, 
a final total of $24,981.70. The average number of pupils belong- 
ing in the evening schools, including 318 in the evening drawing 
schools, was 2876, and the average expense per pupil $8.69, a sum 



SUPERINTENDENT S REPORT. 27 

far larger for the hours spent in school than is the expense per 
pupil in the day schools. The expense per pupil in the evening 
drawing schools is largest of all, $12.61. 

The expense of the schools per pupil for instruction only, — 
that is the quotient obtained by dividing the total of salaries of 
teachers by the average number of pupils belonging to the schools, 
is easily obtained, and is given in detail in this report on page 21. 
The average expense per pupil for books and supplies is an equal 
matter of interest, but the question as to just what constitutes 
"supplies" is less easily settled, and the difference of opinion 
among school officers on this point is so great that the comparisons 
which are often made have little value unless the basis of each is 
carefully explained. All would agree, probably, that text books, 
stationery, etc., come under this head, but how about scissors 
and cloth for sewing classes, lumber and paint for manual training 
classes, or chemicals for laboratories? The distinction between 
supplies and equipment is also a very close one at times. In the 
course of ten years several kindergarten chairs and tables are out 
of commission, for instance; if new ones are purchased is the cost 
to be charged to equipment or supplies? Those who wish to make 
it appear that they are economical in the matter of supplies can 
easily vary the final totals by pretty large sums each year by 
putting such items into equipment. In Lowell, however, the 
custom has always been to charge all purchase of new furniture or 
material which is to replace that which is no longer usable to 
supplies, and to charge to equipment only that which marks a 
distinct advance on previous work. Bearing this fact in mind the 
following figures may be of interest : 

Average cost per day school pupil (kindergartners who use no 
books omitted) for text books and supplementary reading, $0.77 ; 
average per pupil for text books, writing and drawing books, paper,, 
pens, pencils, etc., etc., $1.20; average per pupil, kindergartners 
included, for all possible supplies, including with the foregoing 



28 superintendent's report. 

sewing supplies $269.35, kindergarten supplies, one-half of which 
is equipment, $418.29, manual training supplies $129.10, and 
laboratory supplies, $185.47, $1.23. This sum is, I think, some- 
what below the usual average in Lowell, and is certainly a good 
deal below the average expense in most cities in the country. 

The schools earned in 1904 $6086 in tuitions. Deducting 
this sum, with $2794.62 paid for board of truants, from the total 
expenses of the whole school department for day schools, and 
dividing by the average number of pupils belonging through the 
year we get an average per pupil of $25.64. This sum is very low 
indeed as compared with most cities of the size of Lowell, partly 
because our schools are managed economically but also quite 
largely because in most cities janitors of day schools are paid by 
the school department, making a very material item of expense 
from which the Lowell school department is spared. 

Expenses in 1905 will inevitably be somewhat larger than in 
1904. We begin the year with one more special teacher and four 
more teachers in grammar schools than one year ago, a matter of 
some $2400, and the increase of salary voted to high school 
teachers last June amounts to $2800 annually. Changes and 
additions in the high school annex now under consideration and 
likely to be voted will amount to $1000 or more. The addition of 
these sums to the amount actually expended in 1904 will make 
$306,000, in round numbers, and this sum will be the estimate to 
be presented to the committee on appropriations in January, 1905. 



SCHOOL HOUSES 

In the school year ending in June, 1904, the Green and 
Varnum schools were each forced by overcrowding to place a 
teacher and class of pupils in their assembly hall, and the Butler 
and Highland schools were each obliged to locate two teachers and 
two classes in the same inappropriate place. In the Butler the 



SUPERINTENDENT S REPORT. 2Q. 

shape of the hall made it possible to have these so-called ' ' rooms ' ' 
of pupils quite far apart, in corners of the hall diagonally opposite, 
and the two did not very seriously disturb each other. At the 
Highland, however, conditions did not permit of a similar arrange- 
ment, and the two ' ' rooms ' ' were necessarily side by side. They . 
were separated by a cloth screen, which was a complete enough 
barrier to vision but a very slight interruption to sound, and the 
work of the teachers and pupils could only be carried on at a great 
disadvantage. Anticipating, too, the necessity of placing still a 
third class in the same hall in the fall a petition was presented to 
the city council for the finishing off during the vacation of two new 
school rooms in the open attic which is over the rear of the build- 
ing. This attic is large enough and is sufficiently well lighted to 
provide space and other needed conditions for two thoroughly 
good rooms, and the only objection to them is that they would be 
on the third floor, a common enough thing in most cities but 
happily rare in Lowell. A largely signed petition of citizens was 
also presented to the city council asking for better school accom- 
modations at the Highlands either by the building of a large 
addition to the present schoolhouse or by the erection of a new 
house further south. Such a building, however, would probably 
require two years to secure an appropriation and erect, and the 
need of some increased accommodation was so imminent that it was 
thought best to press the request for the two rooms to be finished 
at once without regard to possible action on the demand for a new 
house. 

The council, however, did nothing with either petition, and 
when the school reopened in September it was found necessary to 
place in the hall not only one but two more classes with three 
teachers, making four classes and five teachers in one open hall. 
Conditions were then, of course, simply intolerable, and to relieve 
them a temporary building of four rooms was hastily erected in the 
school yard. This building cost but $2700 equipped for use. Its 



30 superintendent's report. 

flat roof makes it, architecturally, a most unpleasing blot on the 
landscape, but its rooms are well arranged and comfortable. It is 
doubtless making the best of an unendurably bad condition, but 
should be considered only as the temporary substitute for the 
• larger and better building which is needed. 

In Centralville where land for a new house was purchased in 
1903 it was expected that a new building would be begun in 1904, 
but the city council could not agree on the kind of house to erect, 
and nothing has been done. Probably a new house will be built in 
1905. In the meantime the master of the Varnum school is using 
one of the two kindergarten rooms in his house for a class of his 
pupils, and will be forced in February next to place a second 
"room" in his assembly hall. For his school it is evident, 
therefore, that relief cannot come too soon. 

The Pawtucket school, long overcrowded, has been obliged 
this year to accept what seems to be the fashionable method of 
relief in Lowell, and has located a class of pupils and teacher in its 
assembly hall. The Moody has expanded to the extent of one 
room, but, happily, had an unoccupied room in which to locate the 
new teacher with her class. Would that all our grammar schools 
were equally fortunate. 

The Butler school still lacks the land for a school yard for 
which a plea has been made annually for several years, and a new 
building would already be a great convenience and will be an 
absolute necessity in the immediate future. 

Of the primary schools none are overcrowded except Lyon 
Street, and this could be relieved at once if parents were willing 
to send their children, as they might easily do, to Carter Street, 
Agawam Street and Chapel Street schools which are on the 
three sides of the one in question. 



SUPERINTENDENT S REPORT. 3 1 



SCHOOLS AND TEACHERS 

Four additional school rooms were opened during the year, 
and four new teachers were employed, one each at the Moody and 
Pawtucket schools and two at the Highland. The work of 
Mr. Ketchum who taught drawing in the high school one day a 
week in 1903 was extended to enable him to give also two days 
per week to the supervision and teaching of drawing in the grade 
schools, thus increasing the number of special teachers by one. 
Rooms and teachers in the primary schools and the kindergartens 
remain as before, though one kindergarten has been transferred 
from the Worthen street to the Morrill school building, a change 
which seems a benefit to all concerned. The kindergarten itself 
has increased in numbers in its new quarters, it occupies a room 
which would otherwise remain unused, while at Worthen street its 
absence has permitted the bringing of one class of children from the 
third to the first floor, and has added a much needed room for the 
use of the evening school. 

Changes in the roll of teachers have been as follows : 



DIED. 

Term of 
Service 

Lizzie M. Hadley of the Ames Street School. ...... 35 years 



RESIGNED. 

Bertha J. Curtis of the Bartlett School 5 years 

Lizzie A. Molloy of the Cottage Street School 17 " 

Elizabeth Worthley of the High Street School. ... 13 " 

Mary A. Meehan of the Fayette Street School 9 " 

Fred W. Putnam of the High School 5 " 



32 SUPERINTENDENT S REPORT. 

TRANSFERRED. 

Maude E. Green, from Middlesex Village to High Street. 
Frances Clark, from the Bartlett Primary to the Bartlett 
Grammar. 

ELECTED. 

Anna T. Coburn, to the Central Street School. 
Mary G. Courtney, to the Lakeview Avenue School. 
Annie V. Donoghue, to the Varnum School. 
Esther M. Downing, to the Lincoln School. 
Katherine G. Egan, to the Middlesex Village School. 
Margaret S. Jamieson, to the Howard Street School. 
Eva G. Magoon, to the Agawam Street School. 
Margaret G. McDonald, to the Lincoln School. 
Jennie E. Rogers, to the Highland School. 
Helen D. Swain, to the Pine Street School. 
Edwin M. Roberts, to the High School. 
Bridget K. Smith, to the Bartlett Primary School. 



In the death of Miss Hadley the city loses one of its ablest and 
most successful teachers. Visiting her room the last week in 
October ten years or so ago I found a class of little ones who had 
entered school the previous month, reading and writing many short 
words. From the ease and readiness with which they recognized 
these words I jumped to the conclusion that the class had received 
special drill on a limited list which they had memorized, and I 
asked Miss Hadley how many words the class had mastered. My 
question was so foreign to her method of teaching that she did not 
at first understand it, but when she did her answer was to assert 
that the list included all monosyllables in the English language 
which do not contain silent letters. Further testing seemed to 
show that she was not claiming too much. I did not, indeed, give 



SUPERINTENDENT S REPORT. 33 

her class all the short words in the language, but a great many 
were given, and all pronounced at once. A few years later I 
recalled this incident to Miss Hadley, confessing the surprise I felt, 
and was told in return that she hoped I did not think the case was 
unusual in her room. To prove that it was not she tested a class 
at once, with much the same result as before. After this each year 
she made a point of showing me the work of her five-year-olds 
some time in the fall or early winter when they had been her pupils 
seven or eight weeks, and they were always able to do work of 
about the same sort as that I had first noted. This was, of course, 
because of their mastery of phonics, and their ability to apply to 
any word the sounds which are common in all. In the application 
of this principle I have never seen Miss Hadley' s equal, and if any- 
body, anywhere has ever been able to do more I have never heard 
of it. Miss Hadley was, doubtless, one of the teachers who are 
" born, not made," but her zeal and fidelity were at least the 
equal of her natural ability, and she remained an eager student of 
education to the very end of her life. Few teachers have her 
ability, but all can exemplify her spirit if they will. Most teachers 
of her class, indeed, in Lowell or elsewhere, are constantly reading, 
studying, investigating, experimenting, and so trying to make 
their good work better still, just as Miss Hadley did, and it is only 
the very poor teachers who are sure that they already know so 
much that there is no use to learn more. To such the example of 
Miss Hadley is commended. 



HIGH SCHOOL 

The average number of pupils belonging in the High School 
increased from 839 in 1903 to 890 in the year ending in June, 1904, 
and in September last there was a further increase to 933. No 
addition, however has been made to the teaching force. 

In an earlier paragraph attention was called to the fact that 



34 SUPERINTENDENT S REPORT. 

the city received $6086 in tuitions in 1904. Of this sum $6000 in 
round numbers should stand to the credit of the High School, and 
would make a very material reduction in its expenses. 

The commercial department, established in 1900, graduated 
its first class in a full four years course last June. The class 
numbered 46, 12 boys and 34 girls, and several others who might 
have graduated, were tempted away from the school in the last 
half of their fourth year by the offer of desirable positions. The 
number of graduates in this department, by the way, measures but 
a small part of its work. Many students in other courses have 
taken either the bookkeeping or the shorthand as an elective, and 
many others graduated in 1903 on a three years course. Almost 
all graduates either of last year or of this year who desired posi- 
tions have secured them, and all these, so far as their teachers can 
learn, are doing well and are giving good satisfaction. The 
department has acquired a high reputation abroad, and the large 
number of students in it testifies to the appreciation in which it is 
held at home. 

The graduation exercises of the school were held in Hunting- 
ton Hall, June 21, the principal address of the evening being by 
President Faunce of Brown University. The number of graduates 
was 176, a class not larger than usual, but presenting, as compared 
with classes of a decade ago, one feature of interest which is also a 
subject for congratulations. Less than ten years ago, indeed, the 
proportion of students graduating in the three years' course to that 
of the four years' course was more than three to one. The class of 
1896, for instance, had in it 27 in the four years' course and 94 in 
the three years' course, while in the class of 1904 the conditions 
were nearly reversed, their being 120 in the five and four year 
courses and but 56 in the three years' course. The building in 
which the exercises were held has since been destroyed by fire and 
is not likely to be rebuilt, so that the class of 1904 bids fair to be 
the last to graduate in the old historic hall. 



SUPERINTENDENT S REPORT. 35 

In accordance with custom the program, the names of the 
graduates, the names of the Carney Medal winners, and of the 
honorable mention students ( those holding an average of 90% or 
more ) are given herewith. 



ORDER OF EXERCISES 



1 CONCERT OVERTURE Turandot . . . Lachner 

American Orchestra 



2 MARCH Under One Flag . . . . . Von Blou 

American Orchestra 



3 CHORUS The Heavens Are Telling, from "The Creation" Hayde 



4] [SALUTATORY Flowers in Song and Story 

Elsie Farson Bradt 



5 DOUBLE QUARTET 

First Soprano: Miss Hart '04, Miss Moody '04 
Second Soprano : Miss White '04, Miss Hunking '05 
First Alto: Miss Libby '07, Miss Cove '05 
Second Alto: Miss O'Brien '05, Miss Donnelly '04 

(a) When? ...... Carl Bus ch 

(6) A Little Dog Barked at the Big Round Moon Grace Wilbur Conant 

♦ 

6 REMARKS AND INTRODUCTION OF SPEAKER 

Mr. William W. Duncan, President of School Board 



36 superintendent's report. 

7 ADDRESS 

President William H. P. Faunce of Brown Uniyersity 

8 MALE QUARTET A Moonlight Sail .... Geibl 

First Tenor: Buckle '05 
Second Tenor: Whipple '05 
First Bass: Chase '04 
Second Bass: Gookin '04 

9 PRESENTATION OF PICTURE by Class of 1904 

Melvin Freeman Master, Class President, 1904 

ACCEPTANCE FOR THE SCHOOL 

Mr. Dennis J. Murphy, of the High School Committee 

10 VALEDICTORY Competition 

Denis Augustine O'Brien 



11 SOPRANO SOLO AND MALE CHORUS Wynken, Blynken, and Nod 

Ethelbert Nevin, Op. 9 

Soprano: Miss Moody '04 
First Tenor: Messrs. Buckle '05, O'Brien '04, Barton '04, 

Whipple '05 
Second Tenor : Messps. McDaniels '05, Leith '07, 

Sanders '07, Haggerty '05 
First Bass ; Messrs. Chase '04, Parker '04, Hatch '04, 

Corcoran '04 
Second Bass: Messrs. Gookin '04, Varnum '04 

Keables '05, Shaw '05 

12 PRESENTATION OF CARNEY MEDALS 

Honorable mention of those who have attained a scholarship 
rank of 90 per cent. 

Mr. Arthur K. Whitcomb, Superintendent of Schools 



SUPERINTENDENT S REPORT. 37 

H CHORUS The Lake ..... Franz Abt 



14 PRESENTATION OF DIPLOMAS 

His Honor, the Mayor, Charles E. Howe 



15 SINGING OF THE CLASS ODE Music by F M. A. Venua 

Words by Alice Emily Manning 

With hearts aglow, we're gathered here, 
To sing farewell with parting cheer ; 
The time too soon is drawing nigh 
For classmates all to say Good-bye. 

Farewell to friends and teachers all, 
Whom oft with love we shall recall ; 
Farewell to all our schoolmates dear, 
The parting time at last is here. 

But the future seems so fair and bright 
As we stand here on this parting night, 
That with a brave and hopeful heart 
We each may on life's journey start. 



16 FINALE On Emancipation Day ..... Cook 

American Orchestra 



38 



superintendent's report. 



GRADUATES 



FIVE YEARS' COURSE 



Denis Augustine O'Brien 



FOUR YEARS' COURSE 



Arthur Bradley Barnes 
Charles Leland Batchelder 
Karl Bicknell 
Mitchell Joseph Brosnan 
John Harry Byrne 
Abel Robert Campbell 
Lee Howard Campbell 
Burton Wolcott Cary 
George Ezekiel Coburn 
Marcus Johnson Cole 
Thomas Callaghan Corcoran 
William Andrew Dacey 
Paul Augustine Davis 
Leroy Frederick Fuller 
Edward Joseph Garrity 
William Leonard Gookin 
Ray Bragdon Gordon 
Maurice Ernest Harris 
Lester Raymond Hayward 
Willard Roswell Henderson 
Charles William Henry Hoyt 
Sidney Hewes Hunking 
John Francis LeCam 
Howard Alvord Leland 
Edward Joseph Lynch 
Melvin Freeman Master 
Frank Leslie Miles 
Guy Darrel McVicker 
Thomas Benedict O'Hearn 
Joseph Francis O'Neil 
Robert Butcher Parker 
William Woodward Rawlinson 
Joseph Leonard Sargent 
Albert Terence Scannell 
Joseph Eugene Shanley, Jr. 
Robert Watson 



Daisy Odiorne Abbott 
Elena Marelyn Abbott 
Blanche Estelle Atkinson 
Mertie May Bachelder 
Ruth Merrill Bailey 
Josephine Irene Boyle 
Elsie Farson Bradt 
Ruberta Marie Bramhall 
Annie Leslie Brown 
Carrie Louise Brown 
Ethel Marie Burns 
Margaret Mabel Cassidy 
Emma Sophia Claus 
Anna Theresa Coffey 
Caroline Vaile Cooke 
Mary Christina Frances Curran 
Theresa Belle Darling 
Frances Louise Donovan 
Bessie Durston 
Ruth Lane Eaton 
Marion Faulkner 
Mary Agnes Flynn 
Alma Evelyn Fowler 
Eugenie Viola Frappier 
Mary Margaret Furlong 
Helen Burt Gegenheimer 
Elizabeth Anna Gilinson 
Hazel Sophia Gilmore 
Ida Belle Gray 
Alice Thompson Greene 
Florence Chase Greenlaw 
Rose Verecunda Grennan 
Helen Rose Halloran 
Ivy Lillian Hands 
Loretta Alice Hannifin 
Mae Lillian Hart 



SUPERINTENDENT S REPORT. 



39 



Anna Margaret Higgins 
Alice Mary Hill 
Florence Maud Holgate 
Elizabeth Anna Johnson 
Mary Helen Kelley 
Myrtle Killpartrick 
Jennie Frances Kirwin 
Louise Agnes Beatrice Lennon 
May Ella Patricia Lowney 
Charlotte Rosalyn Macrae 
Alice Emily Manning 
Ella Edith Marshall 
Mary Frances Helen Mollahan 
Lenore Vera Moody 
Evelyn Carrie. Ober 
Anna Madeline O'Neil 
Ethel Noyes Parker 
Jennie May Powell 
Mabel Bertha Purdy 
Elizabeth Munroe Reed 
Julia Frances Richardson 
Mary Emma Richardson 
Mary Estelle Richardson 
Gertrude Katherine Roach 



Ethel Abigail Sargent 
Millie Alice Severance 
Margaret Anna Shanley 
Dora Blanche Sherburne 
Margaret Mitchell Snow 
Mary Spalding 
Ethel May Stevens 
May Davenport Stone 
Marie Regina Sullivan 
Sadie May Sweatt 
Gertrude Katherine Teague 
Margaret Annabelle Teague 
Alice Mabel Unwin 
Regina Vigeant 
Elizabeth Morse Walsh 
Katherine Mary Walsh 
Leone Edith Welts 
Helen May Whitcomb 
Isabelle Eliza Wiggin 
Maud May Willett 
Julia Belle Wing 
Vera Mildred Wood 
Pearl Luella Woodward 



THREE YEARS' COURSE 



Sidney Cyrus Barton 
William Baxter 
Fred Albert Berry 
Harry Warren Bickford 
Wesley Edward Brow 
Leo Waldemar Chase 
James Robie Cove 
Joseph Leo Cunningham 
Earl Voter Daggett 
William Alexander Driscoll 
Thomas Graham Farrell 
Everett Lincoln Field 
John Henry Finnegan 
Clinton Russell Hanson 
Harry Augustus Hatch 
Constant Clement Hinerth 



Alice Rundlett Barclay 
Edith May Beane 
Marion Morse Bill 
Annie Veronica Brodley 
Susie Veracunda Burns 
Marion Alice Doherty 
Alice Louise Donnelly 
Estelle May Drury 
Ethel Evangeline Hall 
Ellen Wilson Jenkins 
Alice Theresa Kane 
Helen Frances Keefe 
Ada Clayton Kitchen 
Honora Hildergarde Madigan 
Ella Mae Martel 
Katherine Louise Morris 



4Q 



SUPERINTENDENT S REPORT. 



Warren Frank Howell 
Charles Augustine Mahoney 
Felton Lord Moody 
Allan Douglas Parker 
Herbert Lang Parker 
Albert Warren Pease 
Arthur Lewis Putnam 
George Freeman Severance 
Thomas Shaw 
Ralph Lewis Sheppard 
Paul Samuel Stephens 
Arthur James Teague 
Thomas Howard Varnum 
Ralph Albertus Wilson 



*Mary Anna McArdell 
Mary Cecelia McLaughlin 
Katharine Philomena O'Brien 
Florence Ardella Oke 
Mabelle Alice Parker 
Alice Magdalen Roach 
Ethel Pearl Trueworthy 
Sophie May White 
Maude Ethel Whitney 
Alma Luella Wright 



Denis Augustine O'Brien 
Ray Bragdon Gordon 
Arthur Bradley Barnes 



CARNEY MEDALS 



Elsie Farson Bradt 
Ethel Noyes Parker 
Elena Marelyn Abbott 



HONORABLE MENTION 



Dora Blanche Sherburne 
Helen May Whitcomb 
Evelyn Carrie Ober 
Caroline Vaile Cooke 
Millie Alice Severance 
Ruth Merrill Bailey 
Elizabeth Anna Gilinson 
Alma Evelyn Fowler 
Anna Theresa Coffey 
Mary Frances Helen Mollahan 
Annie Leslie Brown 



May Davenport Stone 
Hazel Sophia Gilmore 
Margaret Mitchell Snow 
Margaret Mabel Cassidy 
Gertrude Katherine Teague 
*Mary Anna McArdell 
Mary Ella Patricia Lowney 
Mertie May Bachelder 
Alice Emily Manning 
Mary Spalding 



* Deceased 



SUPERINTENDENT S REPORT. 41 

ATHLETICS 

Athletics are at least as old as the times of the Persians among 
whose nobility, according to Herodotus, education for the youth 
consisted of training in courtesy, in telling the truth, and in athletic 
exercises, and of the Greeks among whom sound bodies were 
given honor at least equal to that accorded to sound minds, but the 
problems connected with the subject in the public schools of this 
country are decidedly new. Boat racing between universities like 
Harvard and Yale does indeed go back for a generation or more, 
but football and track meets are much more recent, and in the 
public schools it is only within five years or less that the subject 
has become prominent enough to really force attention upon it. 
Today, however, no problem connected with the schools is arous- 
ing greater interest, and upon none is opinion more divided. 
School committees everywhere realize that they have an elephant 
on their hands, and they do not know what to do with it. That 
its possibilities for good are as great as are its certainties of evil if 
left uncared for only adds to the seriousness of the problem, and if 
a committee seeks to learn wisdom from the experiences and the 
conclusions of others it faces chaos, for no two cities have had the 
same experience, and scarcely any two have come to the same 
conclusion. 

In general it may be said that the subject has been forced to 
the front by the students, their parents, and the public, in the face 
of distrust and possibly opposition on the part of teachers, and 
indifference on the part of committees. Boys and girls have 
organized ' ' teams ' ' of various kinds, or have formed athletic 
associations, sometimes with the sympathetic co-operation of 
teachers but oftener with a reluctant half-hearted support, if 
indeed, with any support at all. Then they have played games. 
If they won the school and the city became proud of them, and 
interest in their doings was increased ; if they lost the school and 



42 SUPERINTENDENT S REPORT. 

the public alleged that failure was due to lack of support, lack of 
training, lack of efficient management, etc., and their teachers had 
to bear the blame so that either victory or defeat brought pressure 
upon school authorities to take the matter in hand. In some 
cases even worse things happened. A team from one city, after a 
game in another city, conducted itself in a way to bring, discredit 
not only upon the school it represented but upon the city in which 
it had its home. The master of the school made haste to disclaim 
all responsibility, but not one in a hundred of those who knew of 
the conduct of the team ever read the excuse of the teacher, and 
those who did generally felt that if he really had no responsibility for 
what his boys were doing he was more rather than less at fault. 
This master, at least, was brought to the point where he must 
either take athletics under his supervision or forbid his pupils to 
engage in competitive contests at all. The latter alternative in 
most Massachusetts cities is already an impossible one. The name 
of the school is not copyrighted, and if it was, and if a master 
should force his pupils to drop athletics under penalty of expulsion, 
it is perfectly evident that the public would not sustain him^ The 
fact is athletics have come, and they have come to stay ; whether 
some of us like it or not 'makes little difference ; it is a situation 
and not a theory that confronts us. 

From the foregoing it is evident that I have no illusions as to 
the effect which my personal opinion will have upon conditions 
which already exist, but I have no desire to use this fact as a shield 
behind which to hide from a record. I am, indeed, perfectly 
willing to stand up and be counted as one who has a very 
thoroughgoing belief in the propriety and the value, value for 
character building even more than for physical development, of 
most forms of wisely directed athletics. I believe fully in basket 
ball for both boys and girls, in base ball, track meets, etc., for 
boys, if properly supervised and managed, and I do not like 
football for grammar or secondary schools. In colleges and 



SUPERINTENDENT S REPORT. 43 

universities the case is different; students there are older, more 
mature, with harder muscles, and always with more thorough train- 
img, but in teams from fitting schools the death roll each year is too 
appalling to allow me to endorse the game. Possibly if I had seen 
more of it I should like it better, but for me the frequent sight of a 
boy stretched upon the ground unable to rise, probably uninjured 
but possibly dead or dying, has in it much more of discomfort than 
of pleasure, and I do not like it. The fact, however, that all of the 
deaths this year, thirteen in number so far as reported, and nearly 
all the serious injuries, some 300 which are a matter of record, 
were in young and untrained teams, or in teams but poorly trained, 
emphasizes as nothing else can do the need of care and of proper 
training if the game is permitted to go on at all. 

But to return to the general proposition. Five years ago I 
should have said that in dealing with athletics in cities the size of 
Lowell there were three alternatives : First to forbid all competi- 
tive meets ; second, to permit the students to run the thing to suit 
themselves, only interfering when some wrong action occurs or 
seems imminent ; and, third, to take charge of athletics as the 
school takes charge of other school exercises, though allowing, of 
course, as much initiative to the players as is possible. Today I 
believe only the last is feasible or right. 

In Lowell, happily, the confidence of the students in the 
master has been so complete, and the master's co-operation 
in the work of the athletic association has been so sane and 
so sympathetic, that the relations of the two have always been in 
the highest degree harmonious and helpful. It is perfectly plain, 
however, that in some cases better results would have followed if 
the master and teachers of the school had had a closer relation to 
some of the teams. A good illustration of the benefit of the co- 
operation of a teacher may be seen in the present condition of the 
girls' basket ball team or of the boys' track team. For the latter 
the boys, after consultation between their executive committee and 



44 superintendent's report. 

Mr. Irish, have recently elected Mr. Woodward as manager. 
Mr. Woodward has never posed as an athlete, but he has good 
sense and the confidence of the boys. The latter are now sure that 
their business will be wisely managed, and that a fair show will be 
given to all. An excellent trainer is assisting them, and the zeal 
and good feeling with which they are taking hold of the work is 
delightful. Whether the team wins any meets or not is yet to be 
seen, and is, indeed, a secondary matter ; the mportant thing is 
that the boys are getting a very valuable physical training under 
conditions which tend to the development of good fellowship, good 
morals, and genuine manliness, qualities which give value to 
any exercise. 

And, indeed, the lact that these benefits reach only a limited 
number, and this the class which needs it least, is the thing about 
it which is most to be regretted. The swiftest runner in the 
school is trained to run still faster in order that he, and the team of 
which he is a member, may win victories, but the slowest runner, 
the boy who really needs this training most, gets none of it, for he 
knows, and all his mates know, that no amount of training will 
make him a record breaker, however much good it may do him as 
an individual. It is this phase of the question which gives interest 
to the announcement of one of our most progressive colleges that 
next year it will make training for all kinds of athletic games and 
competitions a part of its curr culum for all students, the slow and 
the weak as well as the swift and the strong, and that this training, 
through the summer months at least, shall be out of doors. I shall 
be glad if the Lowell High School can sometime offer as much, 
though I am sorry to say that I see no place for such work, cer- 
tainly such compulsory work, at present. In non-competitive 
physical culture exercises, though, the school is already doing 
more than most and about as well as the best. Military drill for 
boys and calisthenics for girls are required of all, and both are as 
good as ample equipment and expert teachers can make them. It 



SUPERINTENDENT S REPORT. 45 

should also, perhaps, be added that the training of the athletic 
association is equally open to all, though not, of course, compul- 
sory, and if those who are not athletic do not take it, it is because 
they do not choose to do so. The doors are always open, and 
Mr. Woodward gives assurance that all shall be welcome. 

In a letter of the headmaster of the High School to the 
school committee, Dec. 27, 1904, he called attention to the re- 
markable development of athletic sports and activities in the school 
in recent years, and expressed the opinion that it is the function 
and duty of school authorities to supervise the whole work, and 
especially to see that reasonable care and prudence are exercised in 
all athletic exercises and competitions to prevent injury to players, 
and he pertinently adds that he does not see how we can escape 
this responsibility even if we desire to do so. " Large numbers of 
pupils," he says "enter into active training either for the physical 
benefit of the exercise, for the sport of the competition, or for the 
honor of places on the class or school teams. These athletic com- 
petitions are, in my opinion, dangerous for young people of the 
high school age unless they are physically fit for them and are 
properly trained and prepared. Mr. Burtt and Mr. Woodward are 
spending all the time at their disposal in looking after the pupils 
who are taking part in athletics, but they do not feel that they 
have the expert knowledge to determine whether the players are 
in such condition physically that they may safely enter the com- 
petitive games, nor is it fair to ask them to take such a 
responsibility." 

In view of these facts Mr. Irish recommends that a physician 
who has had experience in college athletics, and is familiar with 
modern methods of physical training in the colleges, shall be em- 
ployed by the city as medical adviser ; that to him all questions of 
physical condition shall be referred, and that his decision shall be 
final. In this recommendation I most heartily concur. 

In its drill hall in the High School annex the city is lortunate 



46 superintendent's report. 

in possessing one of the very finest places in New England for 
athletic exercises and competitions. A hundred yard track can 
easity be had with oval ends, and the height of the hall is sufficient 
for basket ball or pole vaulting. That it should have a few shower 
baths goes without saying, and I am glad to concur in the further 
request of the headmaster that a couple be put in, as can easily be 
done at moderate expense. 



TRAINING school 

The Training School began the year with a teaching force of 
a principal and nine elected teachers, and thirteen other teachers 
who composed the so-called practice class. Of the latter eleven 
remained through the school year, and were given diplomas in 
June. This period of successful work in actual teaching is the last 
test required by the school committee for a certificate of qualifica- 
tion as teachers, and their graduation placed them on a preferred 
list of candidates from which all vacancies in the primary and 
grammar schools must be filled. This list, however, was already 
so large as to make it probable that there would not be work at 
once for all who were on it, and it was therefore thought wise to 
reduce the size of practice classes for a time. Classes for several 
years had averaged fifteen members, but for the class to begin 
work in September only nine were received. The method of 
selection was by an examination of the same general character as 
that employed in 1903. Of the accepted candidates three are 
graduates of colleges and six of normal schools. 

At the beginning of the year the number of graduates of the 
Training School who had not yet been elected to permanent 



SUPERINTENDENT S REPORT. 47 

positions was thirty-eight. Of these ten were elected in March, 
but their places were more than filled by the addition of the class 
of eleven in June. During the year three candidates have married, 
one was elected in September, one is doing advanced work at 
Radcliffe College, one has been forced to refrain from teaching on 
account of ill health, and eight have been teaching for the whole 
or a considerable part of the year in schools outside of Lowell. Of 
the remainder a considerable part have had permanent places or 
nearly continuous work all the time, but others, especially in the 
first part of the year, had many unwelcome resting spells between 
short and irregular services as substitutes. At this writing./ 
however, in the last week in December, every one is employed, 
and there have been a few times when no certificate holder was 
available to fill vacancies. In such cases others, known as 
emergency teachers, are pressed into service until a Training 
School graduate is available. All graduates who are teaching 
out of town are still candidates for positions in Lowell schools, 
and will return to us as soon as permanent work here is assured 
or even probable. 

The rules of the school committee provide that elections shall 
take place but twice a year, in June and December, and not at 
these times unless there are vacancies enough to permit the election 
of all the candidates who graduated from the Training School at 
the same time. There must, therefore, be ten or a dozen vacancies 
before there can be an election, vacancies less in number being 
filled in the meantime by appointment. This custom accounts for 
the fact that Lowell gives employment to many more substitute and 
temporary teachers than are needed in most cities. As the year 
closes there are four vacancies, one each at Cottage Street, Fayette 
Street, Ames Street and Middlesex Village, and five overflow rooms 
which could be made permanent if the committee should so choose, 
one each at the Moody and Pawtucket schools and three at the 
Highland. The class next in order for election has twelve 
members who are still candidates for positions. 



48 superintendent's report. 

The graduating exercises of the school were held in Colonial 
Hall, June 27, the principal address being delivered by 
Dr. A. E. Winship of Boston, and the diplomas being presented 
by Dennis J. Murphy, Esq., representing the committee on 
teachers. The names of the graduates will be found in the 
appendix, following the names of elected teachers. 



EVENING SCHOOLS 

Attendance in evening schools for the term of 1903-4 was the 
largest in several years, the average for twenty weeks being 2309. 
Several new rooms were opened, and several new teachers were 
employed. Attendance in October was not quite as great, but an 
average of 2338 has been maintained through the new term thus 
far, as against 2494 for the corresponding weeks in 1903. Numbers 
always decrease at and after the holidays of Christmas and New 
Year, and the final total of attendance for the whole term will 
probably be about two hundred less than for the previous term. 
In general policy no special change has been made, but the schools 
are all believed to be doing good work. 

At the request of Commissioner Gay the evening schools were 
represented in the educational exhibit of the state at the St. Louis 
fair last summer, and the collection of material brought to light 
some proofs of work which was even better than had been expected. 
For the exhibit no material was accepted which was not wholly the 
result of things learned in the evening schools, work of pupils who 
had previously attended a day school being rejected although it 
was, of course, much finer than that of those who had never had 
the privilege of previous schooling. Most of the papers selected, 
indeed, were from boys and girls who had been in the country but 



SUPERINTENDENT S REPORT. 49 

a few months, and in an evening school but one term. Many of 
them were unable to read and write in their own language, and all 
had learned all they knew of English in the evening schools. At 
least a dozen nationalities were represented. The work was crude 
and faulty, of course, but that such pupils could write intelligible 
English at all was certainly greatly to their credit, and to the credit 
of the schools in which they had been taught. Considering the 
circumstances their papers were surprisingly good, and while all 
pupils do not do as well, their presentation was conclusive proof of 
the possibilities at least of our evening schools. 

Following are the statistics of the last completed term, with 
names of the graduates of the high school. 



5° 



SUPERINTENDENT S REPORT. 



SUMMARY OF ATTENDANCE. 



For the Term of J903 - 1904. 





c 


c 




Whole Number 


Average 






V 




VI 


5 


V) 






Average 




a 




e , 


c 


o 


on 


Number 






T3 




o o 
o o 

C4' c 


1) H 


U „ 


Time Books 


Belonging 


Attendance 


<u 

< 

H-l 

o 


Schools 


s 

20 
2 


3h 

u 

,G 
u 

H 


-C O 
QJ 

H 












"3 
3 


w 
I) • 

el 

s 




VI 

<L> 

"3 

a 

252 

58 


u 

6 


"3 

O 

H 


VI 

V 

"3 

3 


VI 

O 

"3 

S 
o 


"3 



H 


G 
U 

u 
u 


High 


22 
9 


20 

7 


449 
90 


474 
93 


923 
183 


250 
65 


502 
123 


223 

54 


232 
61 


455 

115 


87 


Aiken Ave... 


92 


Bartlett 


5 


11 


9 




196 


196 




152 


152 




121 


121 


85 


(French) 




























Bartlett 


2 


4 


5 




106 


106 




82 


82 




70 


70 


86 


(Greek) 




























Butler 


6 
4 


9 
10 


8 
5 


161 
164 


60 
98 


221 

262 


78 
71 


40 
56 


118 
127 


61 
62 


39 
50 


100 

112 


85 


Colburn 


88 


CheeverSt... 


2 


8 


7 




154 


154 




101 


101 




98 


98 


97 


Edson 


6 
5 


8 
9 


10 
9 


139 
151 


111 
93 


250 
244 


89 

78 


76 
58 


165 
136 


71 
70 


68 
53 


139 

123 


84 


Franklin 


86 


Green 


10 
1 


21 

1 


17 
1 


593 

26 




593 

26 


317 
20 




317 

20 


279 
14 




279 
14 


90 


Hebrew 


70 


Mann 


13 

3 


38 
6 


31 
6 


640 
101 


95 


640 
.196 


460 
32 


36 


460 

68 


428 
42 


51 


428 
93 


90 


Old Moody.. 


73 


Pawtucket... 


2 


4 


2 


65 


24 


89 


35 


13 


48 


28 


11 


39 


81 


Varnum 


6 


6 
166 


7 
144 


101 


123 


224 


46 


93 
1022 


139 


42 


81 
935 


123 
2309 


90 


Totals 


2680 


1627 


4307 


1536 


2558 


1374 


86 







SUPERINTENDENT S REPORT. 



5 1 



GRADUATES J904 



REGULAR COURSE — Three Years. 



Allen, John Joseph 
Andrews, George Francis 
Burke, Francis Thomas 
Chapdelaine, Rudolph 
Coan, William Francis 
Dawson, Frederick Leroy 
Dean, Ernest 
Jennings, Thomas Joseph 
Kelley, John James 
Moss, Louis George 
McCarthy, John Joseph 
McDermott, Albert Leo 
McDermott, Joseph Francis 
McElroy, John Thomas 
O'Brien, Michael Francis 
O'Hara, Thomas Henry 
Power, Thomas Edward 
Rotheray, Alfred 
Sadlier, William Francis 



Sullivan, Charles Francis 
Winn, Michael Henry 
Burns, Mary Aloysius 
Callahan, Margaret Teresa 
Chalmers, Elizabeth 
Clowater, Georgie Bertha 
Connerton, Delia Ann Loretta 
Cryan, Norah Elizabeth 
Cutress, Mary Helen 
Dooley, Mary Elizabeth 
Greene, Helen Anastatia 
Henessey, Margaret Theresa 
Lincoln, Helen Madeline 
Martin, Mary Ann Elizabeth 
Riley, Margaret Mary 
Rolfe, Gertrude Mary Angeline 
Tarpey, Mary Anna 
Tully, Agnes Angela 
Whitley, Loretta Veronica 



STENOGRAPHY COURSE — Two Years. 



Beaumont, Herbert 
Donahoe, Thomas Patrick 
Edmonds, Robert John 
Maguire, Charles Joseph 
McNaughton, William John 
Riley, Thomas Raymond 
Brooks, Jennie 
Cotter, Hazel Ruth 
Coyne, Mary Frances 
Cox, Harriet Agnes 
Cullen, Jane Agnes 
Curtin, Norah Josephine 
Dowd, Mabel Mildred 



Glynn, Margaret Mary 
Gormley, Josephine Gertrude 
Hanlon, Mary Gertrude 
Harris, Addie 
MacAdam, Mattie Mills 
O'Reilly, Katherine Frances 
Quinn, Margaret Josephine 
Quinn, Mary Beatrice 
Robitaille, Bessie Josephine 
Roche, Annie Josephine Frances 
Sheehan, Katherine Mildred 
Trull, Ella 



52 



superintendent's report. 



EVENING DRAWING SCHOOL. 

Term of 1903- 1904. 



CLASSES 


be 
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a 

O £ 
u 

f. 

1) 

eg 

H 


V 

CO 



3p 

* J XI 

v- , 

x; 


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Whole Number 

of 

Time Books 


Average 

Number 

Belonging 


Average 
Attendance 


V 

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c 

C 
V 

+■> 
*■> 






e/3 

<U 

13 
M 

45 
153 

128 
84 

6 


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13 

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13 

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13 


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34 
113 

89 

72 

10 


in 

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13 


13 

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to 


13 

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c 

u 

a. 


Architecture 

Machine 

deling 

Free Hand .. 

Practical 
Design 


4 

11 

4 

5 

2 
26 




9 
3 
4 

1 


39 
52 

12 


45 
153 
167 

136 

18 


34 

113 

65 

34 

4 


24 

38 

6 


23 
84 
54 
25 

3 

189 


19 
29 

5 
53 


23 

84 
73 
54 

8 


68 
75 

78 
75 

80 


Totals 


20 


416 


103 


519 


250 


68 


318 


242 


75 







SUPERINTENDENT S REPORT. 53 

ENFORCEMENT OF SCHOOL AND 
LABOR LAWS 

The city employs four truant officers of whom one, 
Mr. Sturtevant, acts as supply agent for the school department. 
Two others, Messrs. Kelly and Roussin, are furnished with a 
horse and carriage, and are expected to visit each school in the 
city twice each week. To these schools they take supplies when 
any are to be sent, and at each they obtain from teachers the 
names of absentees or truants. These are looked for, and as far 
as possible returned to school at once. Their regular route takes 
them to all schools in the first two days of the week," and the same 
visitation is repeated in the last two, Wednesday being devoted to 
special cases, or investigations for which there was not time in 
other days. The fourth officer, Mr. Thornton, patrols the center 
of the city, and looks after newsboys and others unlawfully out of 
school. He also looks after special cases in all parts of the city; 
takes in charge the incorrigibles who do not prove amenable to 
the influences of the other officers, and prosecutes all cases in court. 
During the part of the year in which the evening schools are in 
session he looks up absentees from them, and does a large part of 
the work of examining applicants for exemptions from evening 
school on the claim of ability to read and write in English. The 
work of giving work certificates to those who have employment 
tickets is shared by all, though the most of it is done by Mr. Kelly 
and Mr. Roussin. For all there are, too, a thousand and one 
details to be attended to each week which it is impossible^ to 
catalog, and the whole is done with a regularity and effectiveness 
which is worthy of much co'mmendation. No city of which I 
know does more, and few do as much. 

Mr. Sturtevant orders, receipts for, and disburses all supplies, 
examines all bills and prepares them for presentation to the 
committee on accounts, keeps all books and accounts, and in 



54 SUPERINTENDENT S REPORT. 

general acts as the agent of the school committee in a large 
part of its business relations. He has installed a new and very 
excellent system of bookkeeping by which almost any detail of the 
school department business can be seen at a glance, and altogether 
does, and does admirably well, the work for which the agent of the 
school committee in Cambridge is paid $2400. 

The report of the truant commissioners follows my own, and 
to it attention is called for detailed statement of work done. 

In conclusion I have again to thank the school committee for 
continued confidence and support. I desire, too, to bear testimony 
to the ability and fidelity of the teachers of the city and of all with 
whom I have been associated in the work of the school department; 
and for many courtesies and much kindly consideration which has 
been shown me by all I desire to return more than formal thanks. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ARTHUR K. WHITCOMB, 

Superintendent of Schools. 



£ « 



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Absentees 



Truants 



Working without 
certificates 



"Wandering about 
the streets 



New scholars 



Juvenile offenders 



Violating the rules 
of school 



Total number cases 
investigated. 



Arrested 



Sent to the Middle- 
sex County Tru- 
ant School 



Placed on probation 



Prosecution of 
parents 



Visited second time 



Visited third time 



Working certificates 
issued — (14 to i6yrs 
of age) 



Working certificates 
approved — over 16 
years of age 



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COURSES OF STUDY 



Time Table, in Minutes per Week for the Primary 
and Grammar Schools 



Reading 

Arithmetic 

Algebra 

Grammar 

Comp. and Lang 

Geography 

History 

Spelling 

Writing 

Drawing 

Music :... 

Nature Study 

Physiology 

Sewing 

♦Manners, Morals.... 

Physical Culture 

JRecesses 

fOpening Exercises 

Totals 



ist 
Year 


2d 
Year 


755 


590 


150 


210 




75 


20 


20 


60 


90 


60 


60 


60 


60 


60 


60 


30 


30 


25 


25 


25 


25 


30 


80 


200 


200 


25 


25 


1500 


1500 



3d 
Year 



520 

240 



75 
30 
30 
90 
60 
60 
60 
30 
25 

25 

30 

200 

25 



4th 
Year 



1500 



300 
250 



150 
180 
40 
100 
60 
60 
60 
60 

60 
25 
30 
100 
25 



1500 



5th 

Year 



220 
280 



150 

180 
60 

100 
60 
60 
60 
60 
30 
60 
25 
30 

100 
25 



1500 



6th 
Year 



200 

280 



200 

180 
60 

100 
60 
60 
60 
30 
30 
60 
25 
30 

100 
25 



7* 
Year 



1500 



160 
280 

130 

100 

170 

140 

100 

60 

60 

60 

30 

30 

25 

80 

100 

25 



Sth 
Year 



150 

280 

150 

100 

150 

150 

100 

60 

60 

60 

30 

30 

25 

80 

100 

25 



9th 
Year 



1500 



1500 



150 

180 

120 

170 

100 

150 

150 

90 

60 

60 

60 

30 



25 

80 

100 

25 



1500 



* Required by State Law; time fixed at five minutes each day by vote of the 
School Committee. 

t See Sec. 21, Chap. Ill, of the Rules of the School Committee. 

J See Sec. 22, Chap. Ill, of the Rules. If for any reason a recess is shortened or 
omitted the time for the same should be given to physical exercises, and the Rules 
forbid that the hours for closing- school which have been prescribed by the School 
Committee should be changed. 

Book-keeping may receive one-half the time assigned to penmanship 
in the ninth year. 

The above table is intended as an approximate estimate of the 
relative importance of the different studies, and teachers are at liberty 
to vary the time for each study within such reasonable limits as 
circumstances may require. 



COURSES OF STUDY. 57 

FIRST YEAR. 

FIRST HALF. 

Reading. — Teach at first by the sentence or word method or 
by a combination of the two, beginning with script or print letters 
on the blackboard. As soon as a few words are learned use phonic 
analysis to secure distinct articulation and assist in the recognition 
of new words. On the subject of phonetics consult Ward's 
" Manual of Instruction," or Gordon's " Comprehensive Method 
of Teaching Reading." 

Writing. — Short sentences from blackboard copy, or from 
copy written by the" teacher. Make sure that no pupil acquires 
the filthy habit of putting his pencil in his mouth. 

Language. — Children should be led to talk freely about 
things with which they are familiar and to reproduce short stories 
told them by the teacher. Memory gems, brief maxims, and short 
selections of poetry should be learned and recited in this and all 
succeeding grades. History and literature in the form of short 
stories should have some place from the first, care being taken to 
have such stories very simple as well as short. 

Arithmetic. — Numbers objectively from one to five inclusive. 

Physiology. — Oral essons, teaching the names and uses of 
the external parts of the body, and the simplest rules of health. 
Teach the effect of the use of alcoholic stimulants and narcotics, as 
required by the laws of the state. 

Manners and Morals. — As required by the Statutes of 
the Commonwealth and printed on page 26 of the Rules of the 
School Committee in this and all succeeding grades. Mrs. 
Dewey's " How to Teach Manners," or Miss Wiggin's " Lessons 
on Manners," may serve as a manual. 



58 COURSES OF STUDY. 

Nature Study, Music and Drawing. — Throughout the 
course as directed by the supervisor of each of these branches. 

SECOND HALF. 

Reading. — Primers or First Readers of any of the dozen or 
more authorized series. Continue phonics with much drill on 
phonograms and their blending into words. See that every 
sentence is spoken as a whole. In this, as in all grades, the aim is 
to secure comprehension of thought, natural expression, distinct 
articulation, correct pronunciation and ready utterance. 

Writing. — Sentences from the blackboard, chart, and 
teacher's copy. The teaching of spelling should be included in 
the same exercise. See Ward's Manual, page 29. If all the 
letters of the alphabet have not been learned by the pupil by the 
end of the year, unconsciously, give a little special instruction to 
accomplish this object. 

Language. — Conversational lessons and story telling with 

reproduction by pupils, as in the first half. History and literature 

continued. Whenever possible make stories more interesting by 

showing objects and pictures. Begin writing short sentences and 

teach the capital at the beginning of the sentence, the capital I and 
the period and interrogation mark. 

Arithmetic. — Numbers, oral and written, to ten inclusive. 
Use objects at first, but discard them as soon as pupils can do 
without them. Arabic and Roman notation to ten. Teach and 
use the signs +, — , X, -f-, =. Teach objectively the fractions ^, 
}{; coins from one cent to 10 cents, pint, quart, inch. 

Physiology. — As in the first half. In connection with 
names and -uses teach the proper care of the hair, teeth, nails, etc. 
Show importance of cleanliness, exercise, proper clothing, good 
food, pure air, etc., in this and succeeding grades. 



COURSES OF STUDY. 59 

SECOND YEAR. 

FIRST HALF. 

Reading. — The first half of second readers with phonetic 
drill as before. The ideal in this and all succeeding grades of the 
primary course is to have thoughts given as wholes with no 
hesitating over or at the separate words. To enable pupils to do 
this all new and difficult words should be pronounced and their 
meaning explained before oral reading is begun. Then, by 
questioning, make sure that the pupil fully understands what he 
has seen in print, and allow him to read, orally, only when he is 
ready to do so without halt or break. 

Writing. — Sentences and words as in the first year, and 
from dictation. If any pupils have a habit of putting pencils in 
mouths, consider it an important duty to break it up. Use 
capitals, the period and the question mark. As before the same 
exercise should teach spelling. Oral spelling may also be 
practised at the option of the teacher. 

Language. — Teach the use of good English by illustration 
in readings and story telling, using for this purpose selections 
simple enough to be suited to the children and yet such as are in 
good literary form, and give much practice in very simple repro- 
ductions, both oral and written. The literature best adapted to 
this grade is that of fairy tales and folk lore stories, and the history 
is that of mythology and legend. Local history should receive 
attention, and such stories as those of Columbus, the Pilgrims, 
Washington, etc., are appropriate. Suit history to holidays, as 
"The First Thanksgiving" to November, etc. 



Arithmetic. — Numbers, oral and written, in separations, 
combinations and relations, to twenty. Objects may be used if 
necessary, but ought not to be greatly needed. Simple operations 
in small fractions and in denominate numbers also continued. 



60 COURSES OF STUDY. 

Physiology. — The senses ; the eye and sight ; the ear and 
hearing. Teach only the most general features, any thorough 
study of the anatomy of the eye or ear being wholly out of place. 
Temperance teaching as before. 

second half. 

Reading. — Second readers completed. Object and method 
as before. 

Writing. — On paper, from blackboard copy, from dictation, 
and from print as found in the reading book. 

Spelling. ; — Selected words, mainly from reading lessons, 
copied by pupils, either from the book or from dictation, or spelled 
orally, or both. Teach the spelling also of objects like articles of 
food or clothing with which children are familiar and in which they 
are interested. 

Language. — As in the first half. Oral and written exercises. 
Continue to give attention to capitals and the most common marks 
of punctuation. History and literature as in the first half. 

Arithmetic. — Numbers, oral and written, to fifty, with drill 
as in the first half: Roman notation to fifty. Coins and dollar 
sign; pint, quart, gallon; pint, quart, peck, bushel; inch, foot, yard; 
hour, day, week, month, year, dozen. Fractions, ^, }£, ^. 

Physiology. — The senses continued ; the nose and smell ; 
the tongue and taste ; touch. Show the use and value of all the 
senses, and the ill effects of abuse, including under the latter topic 
the effects of alcohol an.d tobacco. Be careful not to lessen 
influence by overstatements. 



COURSES OF STUDY. 6 1 

THIRD YEAR. 

FIRST HALF. 

Reading. — The first half of advanced second readers, and of 
easy third readers. The habit of reproducing that which has been 
read, usually orally but sometimes in writing, becomes in this and 
succeeding grades a matter of the greatest importance, and every 
reading lesson should have in connection with it some work of 
this kind. 

Writing. — On paper with pen or pencil, and in the writing 
book with pen. In all written work in language, nature study, 
etc., insist on order, neatness, and the very best penmanship of 
which the pupil is capable. Allow no pupil to use a pencil who 
puts it in his mouth ; such pupils, if any there are, should be 
required to do all written work with pen and ink. 

Spelling. — Words and sentences copied from books or from 
the blackboard, and afterward written from dictation. New words 
in the reading lesson spelled orally, and afterward written in 
sentences. Give much drill on familiar words which are often 
misspelled. 

Language. — Oral and written exercises. Review, continue 
and extend all work of previous grades. Teach different forms of 
sentences ; the use of is, are ; was, were ; did, done ; saw, seen, 
etc. ; the correct use in the sentence of some synonyms as big, 
large ; like, love, etc. ; and a few homonyms, as fore, four ; 
write, right ; no, know, etc. ; the use of capitals with proper 
names, some abbreviations, and such punctuation as is needed in 
the written work done by pupils. 

The work in history and literature may be extended some- 
what, both in use and in subjects. A little written reproduction 
may be added to the oral, and stories for literary culture may 



62 COURSES OF STUDY. 

include myths, fables and folk lore, such as are given by Haw- 
thorne in his "Wonder Book," or Scudder in his collection of folk 
lore tales. In myths, choose those of natural objects, as " Ulysses 
and the Bag of Winds," etc. History may include more stories of 
noted men and events. The history of Lowell is worthy of much 
attention, especially the story of its founding. Note use of Indian 
names, as Wamesit, Merrimack, Pawtucket, etc. Use pictures 
when possible. History readers or story books will be furnished 
as asked for. 

Arithmetic. — Numbers, oral and written, Arabic and 
Roman notation to one hundred. Emphasize the addition of 
numbers in columns, and the multiplication table. 

Geography. — Teach points of compass with application to 
many objects in and about the school house. At appropriate times 
give observation lessons on natural phenomena, as clouds, frost, 
snow, etc. Note temperature as warm, hot, or cold, and the 
weather as sunny, cloudy or rainy. Keep weather records. For 
further suggestions consult Frye's Primary Geography. 

Physiology. — The bones, teeth, skin and muscles. Teach 
few names, and only the most general features, giving special 
attention to the laws of health. Temperance teaching continued. 

SECOND HALF. 

Reading. — Advanced second readers completed, and sup- 
plementary readers. Continue phonics and enunciation exercises. 

Writing. — Copy book No. 2 with pen, and paper with pen 
or pencil, as before. 

Spelling.— As in first half. 

Language. — At the end of this year pupils should be able to 
write simple statements legibly and in correct form, and should 



COURSES OF STUDY. 63 

have such knowledge of punctuation marks, capital letters and 
common abbreviations as is needed in such writing. They should 
have had some practice in the simplest form of letter writing. The 
work to be done is indicated in the foregoing statement. 

Arithmetic. — Numbers to one hundred. Arabic and 
Roman notation to one thousand. Review and extend the work 
of all previous grades. To be ready for promotion to a grammar 
school, children should be able to add columns of figures to a total 
of 100 rapidly and accurately ; to know the multiplication table to 
ten times ten so as to be able to give products instantly ; to use all 
the common tables of denominate numbers in simple reductions ; 
and to add, multiply, subtract and divide small fractions like 
y 2i % and }i. 

Geography. — Have children read Carroll's Around the 
World, First Book, and add such comment and instruction as shall 
give to the subject the highest attainable degree of interest 

and value. 

» 
Physiology. — Circulation, respiration and digestion. As 

before avoid teaching too much, and make the instruction as 

practical as possible by relating each fact learned to some simple 

and easily followed law of health. 



GRAMMAR SCHOOLS. 



FOURTH YEAR. 



Reading. — Authorized third readers and supplementary 
reading of the same grade. Correlate history and geography with 
reading by the use of stories of heroes either real or mythological, 
and by books of travel or accounts of strange countries and unique 
productions in this and in all higher grades. 



64 COURSES OF STUDY. 

Spelling. — Words in common use, orally and in writing. 
Require definitions or the use of words in sentences to make sure 
that meanings are understood. Make every written exercise a les- 
son in spelling. Select words for practice from all text books used, 
and for supplementary drill use authorized text books as follows: 
Worcester, first half to page 29; second half to page 47; Reed, 
first half to page 24; second half to page 38; Morse, first half to 
page 10; second half to page 30. 

Arithmetic. — Numbers to 1000. Daily oral drill in num- 
bers to 100, as in the primary schools. Written work, with numbers 
usually small enough to be expressed by three figures, in addition, 
subtraction, multiplication and division, no multiplier or divisor to 
be larger than 9. Use terms sum, product, multiplier, etc., but do 
not require definitions. Give problems in dollars and cents, using 
the dollar sign and decimal point. Continue the drill of the pri- 
mary school in easy reductions of denominate numbers. Teach the 
reduction, addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division of the 
fractions j^, %, x /%, y$, j4, illustrating all processes by objects, but 
using the written expression from the first. Second half, continue 
and extend all work of the first half. Notation and numeration to 
1,000,000. Multiplication with multipliers large enough to be ex- 
pressed by two or three figures; and long division, no divisor 
larger than 25. Decimals to thousandths in addition and subtrac- 
tion, and in multtplicands and dividends in multiplication and 
division. 

Language. — The expression of thought, orally and in writing, 
in simple sentences and short stories, with practice in the use of 
such capital letters, punctuation marks and abbreviations as are 
necessary to correct writing. Second half, continue work of first 
half and add the simplest forms of letter writing as outlined in the 
authorized text book to page 104. Blackboard work strongly 
recommended. 



COURSES OF STUDY. 65 

Geography.— Land and water forms ; making and reading 
maps ; form and size of the earth, equator, poles, etc. Make the 
work of the first four months ' ' Home Geography ' ' as far as 
possible, always using forms that can be seen as a basis for the 
comprehension of those which are beyond vision. Second half, 
the surface of the earth in .its great natural divisions ; climate ; 
peoples and races. Continue to relate that which is distant to that 
which may be directly observed as far as possible. 

History. — As many stories should be read by the pupils, or 
told or read to them by the teacher, as time will permit, but the 
number of facts to be required for reproduction should be very 
few, probably not more than could be written on a page of fools- 
cap, or told by a class in the time of a single recitation. These 
few, however, should be learned with the utmost exactness and 
thoroughness ; they should be planned to form the basis of all 
future study of the history of the United States from Columbus to 
the end of the nineteenth century ; should include a few dates like 
1492, 1776, etc., — a half dozen will do very well, but these few 
should be so learned as to be recalled as automatically as the child 
would recall his own name. In the recitation of facts intended to 
be mastered, no mistakes should be tolerated ; nine-tenths of the 
teaching, however, should not have the memorizing of facts, names 
and dates as any part of its object, but should aim to quicken 
interest, broaden vision, stimulate patriotism and develop character 
through appreciation of courage, loyalty and virtue as exemplified 
in the heroes of history. Use pictures, relics, etc., to increase 
interest as far as possible, and remember that whatever else is 
accomplished the lesson is a failure which does not leave the class 
with a desire for further study. 

Nature Study, Drawing, and Music as directed by the super- 
visors of these branches in this and succeeding grades. Sewing 
under the direction of the special teacher in this and the next 
two grades. 



66 COURSES OF STUDY. 

FIFTH YEAR. 

Reading. — Fourth readers and supplementary books. 

Spelling. — As in the fourth year, with words for supplemen- 
tary drill, first half to page 69 in Worcester ; second half to page 
93 ; in Morse, first half to page 44 ; second half to page 64 ; 
Reed, first half to page 56 ; second half to page 79. 

Arithmetic. — Continue all the work of the previous year. 
Whatever else is omitted see that oral drill and rapid written work 
with small numbers are given prominent places on -the programme. 
In written work give many examples and problems with small 
numbers, rather than a few with large numbers. Long division 
with divisors of not more than three figures. In addition to con- 
stant practice with fractions already learned, teach ^-, T V, -§-, y-g-, 
and continue practice in the use of decimals and denominate 
numbers. In the use of the authorized text book omit all the 
examples involving long and tedious operations with large 
numbers. Second .half, continue work of the first half. Teach 
fractions to and including twenty-fourths. Teach least common 
multiple when needed as a means of finding the least common 
denominator of fractions, and factoring and cancellation when 
needed for practical use. Extend work of previous years in 
denominate numbers to include all simple reductions. 

Language. — As in the fourth grade the work is still to get 
from the pupil the expression of thought in correct language, both 
oral and written. In this work clearness of thought is of primary 
importance. The pupil must first have something to say, and then 
be taught to say it in terse and correct English. Dictation, repro- 
duction, narration work and letter writing are approved methods 
of securing the result desired. Second half, to work previously 
done add the study of sentences by name, as declarative, interrog- 
ative, etc., with their division into subject and predicate, and 
begin the study of words and their uses in the sentence to include 



COURSES OF STUDY. 67 

nouns, verbs and pronouns to page 210 in the authorized text 
book. Continue to have pupils do much writing on the 
blackboard. 

Geography. — North America, its surface, peoples and 
countries ; the United States as a whole, surface, climate, people, 
products and trade routes, making the work simple, general and 
elementary as would be suggested by authorized text books. 
Second half, complete continent study along the same lines and in 
the same elementary way as before, to page 115 in authorized 
text book. 

History. — First, review the facts which were taught in the 
fourth year so thoroughly and constantly that no one of them shall 
escape. Second, add about as many new facts, dates, etc., as were 
mastered in the last year, and teach them with the same thorough- 
ness and intensity as was then demanded. Cover the whole period 
of the history of civilized man in America, selecting the new 
matter of this year so as to fill out and supplement the brief outline 
of the previous year, and relate our history to that of the world's 
whole past as far as such relation is natural and helpful. In 
teaching a few indispensable things be satisfied with nothing less 
than perfection, and for the rest and by far the most of the time 
have pupils read and enjoy the stories which are the life of history, 
without attempting to burden them with the recollection of all 
they read. Correlate with Geography, make and use maps, draw, 
use pictures, make collections, etc. 

Physiology. — Book No. 1 of the Union series, as a reader, 
with such comment and instruction in this and succeeding grades 
as shall comply with the following law of this state: " Physiology 
and hygiene, which shall include special instruction as to the effects 
of alcoholic drinks, stimulants and narcotics on the human system, 
shall be taught as a regular branch of study to all pupils in schools 
supported by public money." 



68 COURSES OF STUDY. 

SIXTH YEAR. 

Reading. — Fourth Intermediate and supplementary books. 

Spelling. — As before correlate spelling with every subject 
taught. Make every written exercise a lesson in spelling, and for 
supplementary drill use Worcester first half, to page 1 1 1 ; second 
half to page 125 ; Morse, part III to page 73; second half to page 
82; Reed, first, to page 92 ; second, to page 106. 

Arithmetic. — Continue oral drill and rapid written work 
with small numbers. Review and extend work in fractions, but do 
not attempt to master the too difficult problems of the text books. 
Teach decimals more fully than before, and give many problems 
involving the use of United States money and the reduction of 
denominate numbers. Second half, continue all work of first half. 
Practice in compound numbers should include all common reduc- 
tions, but should omit addition, subtraction ( with the exception of 
the subtraction of dates ), multiplication and division of compound 
numbers as such, longitude and time, metric equivalents, etc. 

Language. — Study of words and their uses continued to 
include all the Parts of Speech. Second half, classes of nouns as 
common and proper, singular and plural, the changes of form 
which are necessary to indicate possession, and their uses as 
subjects or objects of the verb, the distinction of person in 
pronoun, and the use of predicate adjectives. Teach clauses, and 
the distinction between simple and complex sentences. 

The foregoing is the new work of the year, but it should not 
be allowed to prevent the giving of the larger part of the pupil's 
time to a continuation of the more important work of the fourth 
and fifth years in the correct expression of thought in language 
both oral and written, with careful attention to paragraphing, 
spelling, punctuation, capital letters, abbreviations, etc., in the 
written work. Continue blackboard practice. 



COURSES OF STUDY. 69 

Geography. — The groups of states which compose the 
United States in detail, yet in the same general and elementary 
way as before. Second half, foreign countries in detail to complete 
geographic study so far as its elementary phase is concerned. 

History. — Treat the work of the fourth and fifth years in 
history exactly as the teacher of the fifth year was instructed to 
treat that of the year preceding her own, and make a few additions 
in accordance with the plan and in the spirit heretofore suggested. 

Physiology. — Book No. 2 of the Union series, as a reading 
book, with comment and instruction as before. 

SEVENTH YEAR. 

Reading. — Intermediate and supplementary readers. 

Spelling. — Work of the sixth year continued. For supple- 
mentary drill use Worcester, first half to page 135; second half to 
page 145; Morse, first half to page 91 j second to page 112; Reed, 
first to page 118; second to page 128. r 

Arithmetic. — Review constantly the work of all preceding 
years, but especially the work in fractions and denominate numbers. 
For advance work take up percentage, with applications to profit 
and loss, insurance, brokerage, taxes, etc. Second half, to work 
of first half add interest, simple and compound, with applications 
to promissory notes and discounts at banks. 

Grammar. — "Study of the sentence as a means of express- 
ing thought, witft such attention to the parts of speech and their 
classification and inflection as may be necessary to a clear under- 
standing of the construction of the sentence." To page 135 in the 
Mother Tongue, Book II. Three lessons each week. 

Language. — Letter writing, business forms, social notes, 
paragraph and sentence study, descriptions, study of selections, 



70 COURSES OF STUDY. 

etc., as planned in Miss Arnold's " Outline of a Course of Study- 
in Language," seventh and eighth grades, pages 18, 19 and 20. 
Two connected periods each week. Some writing on blackboard 
each day is recommended. 

Geography. — A review and extension of the work of the 
fourth grade, with a larger text book and more scientific treatment; 
the earth as a whole with its forms of land and water, and the peo- 
ple, plants and animals which live upon it. Difficult explanations 
of change of seasons, etc.; sections 19, 20. 21 in text book, may 
be omitted in this grade and taken up in the ninth at the option of 
grammar masters. Second half, mines and quarries; highways of 
trade; the United States in general; view of its people, soil and 
climate. 

History. — Discovery, exploration and conquest of America 
to date of first permanent English settlement in greater detail than 
before, but with constant use of the outline already learned, using- 
the order of the authorized text books. Relate the history of this 
country as far as possible to the European, and especially to the 
English history which preceded it.« Second half, the settlement of 
North America to the beginning of the French and Indian War. 

Physiology. — First half, food and digestion; second half, the 
blood, blood vessels and circulation. General facts relating to laws 
of health are to be emphasized rather than minor details of structure. 
Teach effects of the use of alcohol as required by law. 

EIGHTH YEAR. 

Reading. — Fifth readers and supplementary books. 

Spelling.- — Relate spelling to all other subjects taught as in 
previous years, and use the authorized text books for additional 
drill. Worcester, first half to page 155; second half to page 163; 
Morse, first half to page 120; second half to page 128. Reed, 
first half to page 140; second half to page 153. 



COURSES OF STUDY. 7 1 

Arithmetic. — Review the work of all previous years, with 
further applications of the principles of percentage and interest to 
stocks and bonds, exchange, etc., and add partnership, ratio and 
proportion. Of subjects treated in the authorized text book omit 
equation of payments, problems in exchange involving interest- 
bearing drafts, and the more complicated problems in partnership. 
Second half, involution, evolution, to include second and third 
roots, and mensuration of plane surfaces to and including circles. 

Grammar. — Sentence study continued, with "a detailed study 
of the parts of speech, their classification and inflection, and the 
details of analysis and construction which are necessarily asso- 
ciated with such study. ' ' Three periods weekly. Text book to 
page 267. 

Language. — Continuation and extension of the work of 
Grade VII. For details consult Miss Arnold's outline as before. 

Geography. — Study of the United States as a whole com- 
pleted, and study of separate states in groups taken up far enough 
to include all the eastern, southern and central states. Second 
half, study of the separate states and detatched possessions of the 
United States completed, and a similar study made of the other 
countries of North America, South America and Europe. 

History. — The conquest of Canada and the development of 
the English colonies in America into the United States to the time 
of the Treaty of Paris in 1783. Second half, the establishment, 
growth and history of the Union under the Constitution to the 
administration of Andrew Jackson, 1829. 

Physiology. — The study of the human body as outlined in 
the authorized text book, Union series, Book 3, to include the re- 
spiratory system, the bones, joints and muscles. Second half, study 
of the subject as outlined in the text book completed. 



72 COURSES OF STUDY. 

Nature Study. — Birds, from observation, for recognition, 
knowledge of the time of arrival and departure of those which are 
migratory, habits, food, nesting, etc. All pupils ought at the end 
of the year to know from personal observation a dozen kinds, and 
some, with proper encouragement and assistance, will know from 
seventy to eighty. 

NINTH YEAR. 

Reading. — Fifth readers, Masterpieces of American Litera- 
ture and other supplementary books. Read and study as litera- 
ture 4 Irving' s Rip Van Winkle and Longfellow's Evangeline, in 
the first half, and Whittier's Snow Bound, Hawthorne's Great 
Stone face, and Lowell's Vision of Sir Launfal in the second. 

Spelling. — As in previous years, with supplementary drill 
on words found in the last part of Worcester's Speller in the first 
half, and in the whole book in the last half. Morse, first half to 
page 128; second, complete and review; Reed, finish and review. 

Arithmetic. — First half a review of fundamental processes 
with numbers both integral and fractional, factoring, the finding of 
divisors and multiples, percentage, and so much of geometry as is 
found in the Werner Arithmetic, Book III, to page 150; second 
half, percentage continued with applications to discounts, interest, 
stocks, etc., ratio and proportion, powers and roots, denominate 
numbers, etc., with general review of the whole subject of arith- 
metic and so much of geometry as is given in the authorized text 
book to page 256. Metrics at the option of the teacher. 

Algebra. — Work in algebra may follow the order of the 
authorized text book on algebra, or of the arithmetic. In the latter 
case algebraic fractions may be omitted in the first half of the year, 
at the option of the teacher, and only so much work is required in 
the whole year as will be equivalent to the, completion of the sub- 
ject to page 71 in Wentworth's " First Steps in Algebra." The 



COURSES OF STUDY. 73 

algebra may be taken with the arithmetic or alternated with it, but 
should not receive more than two-fifths of the time allotted to 
mathematics in the ninth year. 

Grammar. — Sentence analysis with more difficult construc- 
tions, and such study of more difficult relations of words in 
sentences and of phrases and clauses, as shall be necessary to the 
comprehension arid use of the English language. 

Language. — As planned in Miss Arnold's outline, pages 20, 
21 and 22. 

Geography. — Asia, Africa and Australia. Omit geographic 
study in the last half of the year. 

History. — First half, complete the history of the United 
States to date. Second half, review the whole subject. 

Bookkeeping. — One-half the time allotted to penmanship 
may be devoted to bookkeeping. 

Nature Study. — Trees from observation. Pupils ought to 
be able at the end of the year to locate and describe forty varieties 
which they have seen in or near the city. 



74 



COURSES OF STUDY 



HIGH SCHOOL 





Classical 


College 


Scientific 


Modern Language 


U 
08 

1> 


♦Latin I. 


*Latin I. 


Lat. I or Man. Tr. I. 


♦French I. 


> 


♦Algebra 


♦Algebra. 


* Algebra. 


♦Algebra. 


— • 


♦English I. 


♦English I. 


♦English I. 


♦English I. 


il 


♦Phys. Geog. kf. 


♦Physics ///. 


♦Phys. Geog. ///. 


♦Phys. Geog. kf. 


u 

a 


Latin II or French I. 


♦Latin II. 


Lat. II or Man. 


♦French II. 


Geometry. 


♦Geometry. 


Train. II. 


Geometry 


a 


Physics, 


Gr. I or Fr. I. 


♦Geometry. 


♦Physics 


u 


*Hist. and Eng. II. 


*Hist. and Eng. II. 


♦French I. 


♦Hist, and Eng. II 


(A 






♦Hist, and Eng. II. 






Latin III or Fr. II 


• 
♦Latin III. 


♦Coll. French 


♦French III. 


b. 


or I. 


♦English III kf. 


♦English III kf. 


*Hist. and Eng. III. 


u 


♦Hist, and Eng. III. 


♦French I. 


♦Coll. Math. 


Physiology kf. 


> 
u 


Physiology ///. 


♦Coll. Math. 


*Hist. IV kf. 


fAstron. and Geol. 


f Astron. and Geol. 


Gr. II or Fr. II. 


♦Coll. Physics or Ger- 


German I. 




Chemistry I. 


German I. 


man I. 


Chemistry I. 


German I. 


♦Gk. and R. Hist. 




Rev. Alg. and Geom. 




Rev. Alg. and Geom. 










Latin IV. or Fr. II 


♦Latin IV. 


French III. 


German I or II. 


CB 
O 

> 


or III. 


'English IV. 


Ger. I or Coll. Phys. 


*English IV. 


♦English IV. 


*Coll. French II. 


♦English IV. 


History IV. 


JZ 


History IV. 


Gr. III. or Fr. III. 


♦Geom. and Trig. 


Chemistry I or II. 


3 


Botany kf. 


German I or II. 


Chemistry I. 


Botany kf. 


O 
U. 


German I or II. 
Chemistry II. 


Geom. and Trig. 
Coll. Physics. 







♦Prescribed. 

fAstronomy and Geology may be taken the fourth year instead of the third year. 



COURSES OF STUDY. 



75 



Manual Training 


Commercial 


Textile School 


Five Years College 

All Studies Prescribed 


*Man. Train. I. 
♦Algebra. 
♦English I. 
*Phys. Geog. hf. 


♦Bookkeeping I. 
*Alg. and Ment.Arith. 
♦English I. 
♦Com. Geog. hf. 


Latin I or French I 
or Man. Train. I. 

♦Algebra. 

♦English I. 

*Phys. Geog. hf. 


First Year 

Latin I. 

Algebra. 
English I. 
Physics hf. 


*Man. Train. II. 

Geometry. 

Physics. 

French I. 
*Hist. and Eng. II. 


♦Bookkeeping II. 
♦Com. Law and Arith. 

French I. 

Geometry. 

Physics. 

♦Hist, and Eng. II. 
(Select 4) 


Latin II or French II 
or Man. Train. II. 
♦Geometry. 
♦Physics. 
♦Hist, and Eng. II. 


Second Year. 

Latin II. 

Greek. 

Hist, and Eng. II. 

Geometry. 




Third Year. 


*Man. Train. III. 
♦Hist, and Eng. III. 

Physiology hf. 

French II or I. 


♦Bookkeeping III. 
♦Stenog. and Type- 
writing I. 
♦Hist, and Eng. III. 

Physiology hf. 

French II or I. 

German I. 

Chemistry I. 


♦Chemistry I. 
♦Coll. Math. 
French III or I, or 
German I. 
♦English III hf. 


Latin III. 
Greek II. 
English III ///. 
French I. 


f Astron. or Geol. 
German I. 
Chemistry I. 


Fourth Year. 

Review Latin III. 
Review Greek II. 
English IV. 
Gr. and R. Hist. 
Coll. Math. 


*Man. Train. IV. 
French II or III. 


♦Stenography II. 
♦Typewriting II hf. 

French II or III. 
♦English IV. 

History IV. 

German I or II. 

Chemistry II. 


^English IV. 
*Coll. Physics. 

Fr. II or German I 
or II. 

Chemistry II. 

History IV. 
♦Geom. and Trig. 


German I or II. 
*English IV. 
Geom. and Trig. 
Chem. il or Chem. I. 
History IV. 


Fifth Year. 

Latin IV. 
Greek III. 
Coll. Physics. 
Coll. French II. 



♦Prescribed. 

{Astronomy and Geology may be taken the fourth year instead of the third year. 



76 COURSES OF STUDY. 



NOTES ON HIGH SCHOOL COURSES 

OF STUDY 

i 

Pupils who intend to enter the High School are requested to 
consider the preceding courses of study with great care, as changes 
from one course to another during the year are impracticable, and 
a change after the first year may cause the pupil to lose time. The 
teachers of the school will gladly give parents and pupils any 
assistance and advice possible in their selection of studies. 

In each course, certain studies are prescribed, but the pupils 
may make up the remainder of the required studies from a wide 
range of elective subjects. The prescribed studies in each course 
are starred. Satisfactory completion of three years' work in any 
course will entitle the pupil to a three years' diploma. Satisfactory 
completion of four years' work in any course will entitle the 
pupil to a four years' diploma. Those who satisfactory complete 
the five years' College course will be entitled to a five years' 
diploma. 

The Classical Course is intended for students who do not 
intend to enter College, but who desire the best general education 
that the High School furnishes. 

The College Preparatory Course will fit students for any 
American College and may be completed in four or five years. 
It is necessarily difficult. The student is advised to take five years 
in preparation for Radcliffe or Harvard College. 

The High School has been approved by the New England 
College Entrance Certificate Board and the school certificate of 
preparation is accepted by all the institutions represented on this 
Board which includes Amherst College, Boston University, 



COURSES OF STUDY. 77 

Bovvdoin College, Brown University, Dartmouth College, Mount 
Holyoke College, Smith College, Tufts College, University of 
Maine, Wellesley College, and Wesleyan University. Under the 
certificate method of admission to college the school is held 
responsible for the grade of work done by its students in College. 
Experience has shown that unless students are able to attain easily 
grade B (80-90%) in their High School work, they will be unable 
to do the quality of work demanded by the above named colleges. 
Consequently, the school certificate must be refused those pupils 
who are unable to obtain a scholarship standing of more than 80%. 
Students who fail to obtain the school certificate, may, however, 
take the admission examinations. The following, taken from 
correspondence with one of the colleges, is quoted to show the 
general attitude of the colleges in regard to the use of the certificate 
method of admission. 

"Some of our best schools are protecting their own certificates 
by demanding a higher standard of excellence for certification to 
college than for graduation, and requiring all doubtful men to 
submit to the test of a college entrance examination; we recom- 
mend this policy for all schools. It must always be borne in mind 
that the certificate system is not designed as a means for making it 
easier for a poor scholar to enter college, but simply for placing 
the decision of fitness upon the men who best know his attain- 
ments ; the protection of the integrity of the certificate is of equal 
importance to school and college. The College is keeping a 
permanent record of the results obtained from each school, as 
determined by the work of their men during the first semester of 
Freshman year." 

The Scientific Course will prepare students for the Institute 
of Technology, the Worcester Polytechnic, the Chandler Scientific 
and other technical schools. 

The Modern Language Course is similar to the Classical 
Course, but requires a modern foreign language instead of Latin. 



78 COURSES OF STUDY. 

In educational value it is practically equivalent to the Classical 
Course. 

The Manual Training Course offers a combination of the 
ordinary High School studies with practical work in the use of 
tools and machines, together with a complete course in mechanical 
drawing and technical drafting, and allows the student to specialize 
somewhat in mechanical work. It also furnishes an excellent 
general training. 

Note. — Candidates for the Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
and Worcester Polytechnic School should not take this course for more than 
two years, as manual training counts only as an elective in the admission 
requirements. 

The Commercial Course is designed for those who expect to 
engage in business pursuits upon leaving the High School, and has 
been arranged so that the pupil will receive the same amount of 
mental training and therefore will acquire as much mental power as 
in any other course. It is not less educational than other courses 
and must not be selected with the conviction that it is "easy." 

Subjects marked hf have a value equivalent to only one-half of 
those without such mark, and such subjects will come on alternate 
days. 

There will be no formal examinations in the middle and at the 
close of the year, but the standing of the pupil will be made up 
from his daily recitations and frequent tests. This standing is in- 
dicated by letters on the monthly reports, which are sent home for 
parents' inspection. A shall indicate a mark from 90 to 100 
per cent; B, a mark from 80 to 90 per cent; C, a mark from 65 to 
80 per cent; Z>, between 50 and 65 per cent; and E, any mark 
below 50 per cent. 

A standing of C for the year must be attained in order to pass 
a given subject. A standing of B is required for permission to 
take the college preliminary examinations. A final mark of D or 
E means failure. If the failure is in a required subject, the subject 
must be repeated; if in an elective, an equivalent subject may be 



COURSES OF STUDY. 79 

substituted. Pupils who have completed nine, five or two full sub- 
jects will be classed respectively as fourth year, third year or second 
year students. Those who have completed a less number for each 
year will be classed respectively as third year, second year and first 
year students. 

In preparation for the Normal School, select either the Classi- 
cal Course or the Modern Language Course, preferably the former. 
The candidate should select four studies for the second year and 
should be prepared in Mathematics and Science for the preliminary 
examinations in June of the third year. For Medical Schools and 
some of the smaller colleges, select the Classical Course. For 
other colleges select the College Course. In this course French 
and German may be substituted for Greek in preparation for some 
colleges. For the Lawrence Scientific School, select the College 
Course, or the College Course with Manual Training in place of 
Physics. 

By an examination of the courses of study, it will be seen that 
for a diploma a minimum number of subjects in each year of each 
course is required. But in preparing for the higher institutions of 
learning more than the minimum number of subjects, depending on 
the requirements of the college, will need to be taken. At the be- 
ginning of his second year, the pupil, therefore, should decide upon 
the college or school for which he wishes to prepare, and should 
select his subjects to fit the requirements. He should make him- 
self familiar with the requirements and also obtain the advice of his 
teachers in selecting his subjects. Candidates for Smith, Wellesley 
and Mt. Holyoke should send applications for admission as early 
as their third year. 

Classes will not be formed in electives for less than twenty 
pupils in the first or second year, fifteen in the third year, and twelve 
in the fourth year. 

Unprepared work in Music, Calisthenics, Elocution, Ethics, 
and Military Drill, is required. 



80 COURSES OF STUDY. 

Calisthenics and Military Drill are optional the fourth year. 
Elocution is prescribed throughout the course for all pupils except 
those who are pursuing four full studies. In this connection Book- 
keeping is considered a half study. 

Three years' work in Calisthenics and Elocution, or Military 
Drill and Elocution, provided the attendance at these exercises is 
90 per cent of the possible attendance, will be considered as equiv- 
alent to a half subject for a diploma. Four years' work will be 
considered equivalent to a full subject. 

Since Bookkeeping requires no preparation outside the class- 
room, when taken as a part of any other course than the Commer- 
cial Course, it will be counted only as a half subject for a diploma. 



MINIMUM NUMBER OF SUBJECTS REQUIRED 
FOR A DIPLOMA. 

First Yean — Three and one-half subjects in all courses. 
Second Year. — Three subjects in all courses except the Com- 
mercial Course, in which four must be taken. 

Third Year* — Three and one-half subjects in all courses. 
Fourth Year* — Three and one-half subjects in all courses. 



ROLL OF TEACHERS 



Giving Name, Grade, Residence, Dale of Election and Salary. 



HIGH SCHOOL. 

Kirk and Anne Streets. 

Cyrus W. Irish, Headmaster 308 Nesmith street - - 1885 $3000 

Frank B. Sherburne, Sub Master, 58 Dover street, Greek 

and Latin ......... 1883 2200 

Mary A. Webster, First Assistant, 45 Varney street, 

English and Mathematics - - - - - -1859 1000 

Charlotte E. Draper, 47 Belmont avenue, Ccesar, 

Astronomy, Geology and Geometry .... 1870 1000 

Alice J. Chase, 262 Fairmount street, History and English 1877 1000 

Susie L. D. Watson, 390 East Merrimack street, United 

States History and Mathematics - 1885 900 

Adelaide Baker, 136 Myrtle street, French - - - 1885 900 

Jennie L. Allen, 947 Middlesex street, Physics and 

Physiology ......... 1885 900 

Emma L. Bradley, 485 Westford street, French - - - 1890 900 

Gertrude A. Rodliff, Chelmsford Centre, Mass., History 

and English - - - - - - - ... 1890 900 

Marietta Cassidy, 4 Fifth Avenue, Latin and Algebra - 1890 900 

Georgiana F. Vinton, 52 Fourth Street, History, English 

and Algebra - .... 1872 1000 

Grace M. Goodhue, 120 School street, Ancient History 

and Latin ......... 1893 900 

Bessie E. Huntoon, 64 Warwick street, French and 

Physiology ......... 1894 900 

Grace Ward, 279 Chelmsford street, Physics and Physical 

Geography 1895 800 

Mary E. O'Connor, 60 Varnum street, History and English 1896 800 



82 ROLL OF TEACHERS. 

Carl D. Burtt, 93 Fort Hill avenue, Greek and German - 1895 I 8oo 

Frederick R. Woodward, 168 Sixth street, Mathematics - 1895 1800 

Helen M. Lambert, 283 Pawtucket street, Chemistry - 1897 800 

Thos. F. Fisher, 305 East Merrimack street, Manual 

Training ......... 1898 1500 

Anne M. Day, 278 East Merrimack street, History and 

English ---------- 1 899 800 

Helen BUTTRICK, 307 Wilder street, Botany and English - 1899 800 

Edward S. Colton, Jr., Swan Bldg., Commercial Law and 

Bookkeeping - - - - - - - - N - 1900 1500 

Mary G. Stevens, East Merrimack street, Tewksbury, 

English and History ------- 1900 800 

Mary H. Killpartrick, 609 Stevens street, English and 

Commercial Geography ------- 1901 800 

Nathaniel H. Atkins, 88 Warwick street, Commercial 

Law and Bookkeeping -,----,- 1901 1200 

Adelaide E. Sweetsir, 276 Westford street, English and 

Algebra -----..--- 1902 800 

Margaret V. Spear, 576 Westford street, French and 

English ---------- 1902 800 

Elsie Ryder, 90 Chestnut street, Arithmetic and Commer- 
cial Law ......... 1902 800 

Ernest M, Hunt, 90 Chestnut street, Shorthand and 

Typewriting - - - - - - - - -1902 1200 

Ethel W. Whitcomb, 2 Belmont street, Shorthand and 

Typetvriting ......... 1903 700 

Mirion H. Milner, 102 Chestnut street, Physical Culture 

and Elocution ........ 1902 800 

Edwin M. Roberts, 74 Stevens street, Manual Training - 1904 800 

Ethel M. Everett, temp., 12 Belmont street 

Elizabeth H. Murphy, temp., 159 Third avenue 

Alice Richardson, temp., 213 Branch street. - 

Harold R. Wade, temp., 278 East Merrimack street - 

Colby T. KiTTREDGE, 14 Ralph street, Military Instructor - 1901 500 

Katharine H. Coggeshall, 108 Appleton street, ^Secretary 1899 500 



ROLL OF TEACHERS. 



83 



BARTLETT GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 

Wannalancit Street. 

Cyrus A. Durgin, Master, 117 Bowers street 

Belle A. Prescott, 9th year, 68 Mt. Washington street 

Charlotte M. Murkland, 8th year, 117 Bowers street 

Blanche A. Cheney, 8th year, 34 Arlington street 

Amy L. Tucke, 7th year, Hi Butterfield street - 

Frances Clark, 7th year, Chelmsford Centre 

Belle F. Batchelder, 6th year, 66 Arlington street - 

Carrie E. Erskine, 6th year, 138 Mt. Vernon street - 

M. Ida Howe, 5th year, 84 Methuen street 

Maria W. Roberts, 5th year, 414 Andover street 

Alice D. Sunbury, 4th year, 142 Wilder street - 

Mary E. Walsh, 4th year, 9 Corner street - 

Mary G. Quinn, temp., 6th year, 28 Chapel street 



- 1891 


#2000 


- 1878 


600 


. 1898 


600 


- 1896 


600 


- 1880 


600 


- 1899 


600 


- 1883 


600 


1893 


600 


- 1873 


600 


- 1875 


600 


- 1899 


600 


- 1897 


600 



BARTLETT PRIMARY SCHOOL. 
Bridget K. Smith, 3d year, 117 Stackpole street 
Sarah E. Ames, 2d year, 119 Hall street 
Alice G. Barrett, 1st year, 93 Mt. Vernon street 
Essie E. Roche, 1st year, 1835 Middlesex street - 



1904 


$ 450 


1902 


600 


1901 


600 


1903 


600 



MORRILL SCHOOL. 

Common and Adams Street. 
Nellie M. Brown, Principal, 3d year, 426 Fletcher street 
Annie M. Courtney, 2d year, 196 Pawtucket street - 
Agnes T, Courtney, 1st year, 11 Marsh street 



1865 


$ 650 


1887 


600 


1891 


600 



CROSS STREET SCHOOL. 

Cross Street between Fletcher and Mt. Vernon Streets. 

Sarah E. Scales, Principal, 3d year, 28 Ralph street - - 1866 $ 650 

Ellen M. White, 2d year, 1057 Middlesex street - - 1863 600 

A. Gertrude Stiles, 1st and 2d years, 72 Varney street - 1895 600 

Katherine Kelly, 1st year, 98 School street - - - 1893 600 



8 4 



ROLL OF TEACHERS. 



BUTLER GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 

Gorham Street. 

Cornelius F. Callahan, Master, 410 Walker street - 
Nellie F. Murphy, 9th year, 85 Sherman street 
Helen E. Gookin, 9th year, Wamesit 
Mary I. Donlan 8th year, 455 High street 
Mary E. Lane, 8th year, Billerica .... 
Delia T. Brady, 7th year, 183 Chapel street 
Kate E. Kelley, 7th year, 129 Moore street 
Agnes M. Foley, 6th year, 37 Newhall street 
Sadie E. Tully, 6th year, 105 Westford street 
Annie J. Devine, 6th year, no Carlisle street 
Mary L. Crowley, 5th year, 52 Mt. Washington street 
Alice C. O'Brien, 5th year, 22 William street 
Mary L. McSorley, 5th year 34 Nesmith street - 
Etta G. Burns, 5th year, 154 Perry street - 
Marguerite J. Cronin, 5th year, 228 Plain street 
Katherine M. Usher, 4th year, 465 Parker street 
Josie V. Hoar, 4th year, 87 Mt. Washington street 
Marguerite G. Hyde, 4th year, 5 Floyd street - 
Katherine M. Jantzen, 4th year, 3 Olive street 



1885 


$2000 


1878 


600 


1897 


600 


1890 


600 


1894 


6qo 


1883 


600 


1883 


600 


1887 


600 


1897 


600 


1 901 


600 


1902 


600 


1897 


600 


1879 


600 


1901 


600 


1900 


600 


1895 


600 


1901 


600 


1902 


600 


1902 


600 



LYON STREET SCHOOL. 

Corner Lyon and Central streets. 
Alice T. Lee, Principal, 3d year, 12 South Walker street 
Annabel Costello, 2d year, 293 Nesmith street - 
Mary J. McCarry, 1st year, 536 Fletcher street 
Nellie A. Hunt, 1st year, 68 Elm street 
Elizabeth B. Dame, 1st year, 178 First street 



1878 


$ 650 


1888 


600 


1881 


600 


1884 


600 


1902 


600 



CARTER STREET SCHOOL. 

Carter Street 

Isabella T. Vinall, Principal, 3d year, 1 Glidden avenue 
Margaret J. Connors, 2d year, 48 Walnut street 



1873 
1894 



650 
600 



ROLL OF TEACHERS. 85 



1897 


600 


1897 


600 


1901 


600 



1889 


$ 650 


1895 


600 


1904 


500 



Catherine F. Brady, 2d year, 173 Chapel Street 
Mary V. Johnson, istyear, 23 Lombard street - 
Delia C. Maloney, 1st year, 70 Elm street 

AGAWAM STREET SCHOOL. 

Agawam and Barrington Streets. 

Mary A. Fay, Principal, 3d year, 115 Stackpole street 
Susan G. Neilon, 2d year, 135 Andrews street - 
Eva Magoon, 1st year, 70 Church street 



LONDON STREET SCHOOL. 

Corner of London and West Streets. 
Elizabeth R. Maguire, Principal, 3d year, 60 Fort Hill ave. 1884 $ 650 
Alice A. Masterson, 1st and 2d years, 57 Christian street - 1892 600 

Mary F. Hill, 1st and 2d years, 94 Midland street - - 1887 600 

Mary E. Crowley, 1st year, temp., 436 Lincoln street 

WEED STREET SCHOOL. 

Corner of Weed and Gorham Streets. 

Mary B. McGovern, Principal, 3d year, 204 Moore street - 1886 $ 650 

Lilla M. McEvoy, 2d year, 181 Moore street - - - 1893 600 

Mary F. Devine, 1st year, 1527 Gorham street, East 

Chelmsford .-----.-. 1902 600 

EDSON GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 

Highland Street 

Calvin W. Burbank, Master, 130 Bowers street - - 1872 $2000 

Frances M. Webster, 9th year, 45 Varney street - - 1873 600 

Rosalie T. Burns, 8th year, Rogers Street, Corner 

Butman road --------- 1878 600 

Annie E. Donovan, 7th and 8th years, 27 Madison street - 1895 600 

Bertha M. Rowlandson, 6th and 7th years, 11 Holyrood 

avenue ---------- 1891 600 

Kate J. Hayes, 6th year, 15 Floyd street - 1879 600 

Margie F. Marren, 5th and 6th years, 420 Fletcher street - 1886 600 



86 



ROLL OF TEACHERS. 



Sarah J. Crosby, 5th year, 12 Simpson place 
Bertha McCue, 5th year, 217 Appleton street 
Mary A. Balch, 4th year, 257 Appleton street - 
Julia B. Riordan, 4th year, 58 Second avenue - 
Julia A. Kenney, 4th year, 99 Washington street 



1868 


600 


1900 


600 


1865 


600 


1897 


600 


1 90 1 


600 



CHARLES STREET SCHOOL. 

Charles Street, between Gorham and Chapel streets. 

Alice T. Owens, Principal, 3d year, 4 Belmont street - - 1878 $ 650 

Ella E, Gardner, 2d year, 225 Branch street - - - 1871 600 

Ellen A. O'Connell, 2d year, 48 Mead street - - - 1896 600 

Margaret A. Harrahan, 1st year, 32 Marshall street - 1882 600 



COTTAGE STREET SCHOOL. 

Corner Cottage and Chapel Streets. 

Rose E. MacVey, Principal, 2d and 3d years, 46 Linden 

street -.-- 1887 

Annie L. Murphy, 1st and 2d years, 870 Gorham street - 1901 

E. Laura Moore, temp., 1st and 2d years, 48 Hastings street 



650 
600 



ELIOT SCHOOL. 

Corner Favor and Summer Streets. 

Ellen A. Stillings, Principal, 1st and 2d years, 24 Bellevue 
street - - - - - - - - -»- 

Ellen A. Corbett, 3d year, 32 Highland street - 

Nellie T. O'Grady, 2d year, 73 Newhall street - 

Loyola McCann, 1st year, 17 Wentworth avenue 



1875 


$ 650 


1878 


600 


1 881 


600 


1893 


600 



GREEN GRAMMAR SCHOOL 

Merrimack Street. 

Albert L. Bacheller, Master, 25 Nesmith street 
Ruth B. Bailey, 9th year, 56 Sixth street - 
Clara A. Hanaford, 8th year, 142 Wilder street 
Sadie F. McCort, 8th year, 13 Ralph street 
Lizzie A. Nolan, 7th year, 301 Pawtucket street 
Esther G. Donlan, 7th year, 455 High street 



1874 


$2000 


1871 


600 


1869 


600 


1901 


600 


1876 


600 


1897 


600 



ROLL OF TEACHERS. 87 

Jennie E. Fay, 6th year, 1 15 Stackpole street - - - 1891 600 

Mary M. Kearney, 6th year, 94 Andrews street - - 1895 600 

Lena A. Gookin, 5th year, 20 Walden street - - - 1880 600 

Catherine F. McCarthy, 5th year, 647 Market street - 1889 600 

Ella J. Carleton, 4th year, 1072 Bridge street - - - 1882 600 

Annie T. Delay, 4th year, 87 Mt. Washington street - - 1900 600 
Loretta L. Ward, temp., 6th year, 220 Fletcher street 

KIRK STREET SCHOOL. 

Corner Kirk and Lee Streets. 
Eliza A. Davis, Principal, 2d and 3d years, 100 Canton street 1881 $ 625 

Laura H. Palmer, 1st and 2d years, 35 Thirteenth street . 1882 600 

CABOT STREET SCHOOL. 

Corner Cabot and Ford Streets. 

Katherine T. Lennon, Principal, 3d year, 144 School street 1885 $ 650 

Mary T. Whelley, 2d year, 1 Fenwick street - - 1897 600 

Mary J. Murphy, 1st year, 112 Jefferson street - - - 1887 600 

CHEEVER STREET SCHOOL. 

Cheever Street. 
Ida J. Clarke, Principal, 2d and 3d year, 26 Ash street - 1887 $ 650 

Anna A. Sargent, 1st year, 223 Liberty street - - - 1864 600 

WORTHEN STREET SCHOOL. 

Worth en Street, between Market Street and Broadway. 

Marv J. Alger, Principal, 1st year, 43 Royal street - - 1868 $ 650 

Esther V. Green, 2d year, 674 Broadway - 1889 600 

Mary R. Marren, 3d year, 420 Fletcher street - - - 1890 600 

Elizabeth A. Page, 1st year, 647 Market street - - - 1901 600 

HIGHLAND GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 

(Telephone 1094-2) 
Pine Street. 

Charles W. Morey, Master, 14 Belmont street - - 1880 $2000 

Flora I. Moffitt, 9th year, 76 Canton street - - 1887 600 



1891 


600 


1869 


600 


1 885 


600 


1895 


600 


1894 


600 


1870 


600 


1890 


600 


1874 


600 


1900 


600 


1897 


600 


1901 


600 


1904 


500 



88 ROLL OF TEACHERS. 

Mary F. Foss, 9th year, 62 Burtt street 

Abbie F. Woodward, 8th year, 157 Dartmouth street - 

Estelle L. Whitney, 8th year, 13 Oakland street 

Leonora K. Battles, 7th year, 11 Edson street - 

Anna A. Burnham, 7th year, 247 Liberty street - 

Luella A. Wardwell, 6th year, 13 Oakland street 

Minnie C. Gray, 6th year, 106 Liberty street 

Fannie M. Clark, 5th year, 13 Oakland street 

Lulu Turner, 5th year, 11 Edson street 

Grace R. Sanders, 4th year, 67 South Loring street 

Mabel E. Brown, 4th year, 172 Branch street 

Jennie E. Rogers, 4th year, 214 Gibson street 

Helen A. Dow, 5th year, temp., 149 B street 

Alice H. Bacheller, temp., 6th year, 25 Nesmith street 

Edith V. Cockerille, temp., 7th year, 210 School street 

HIGHLAND ANNEX. 

At Franklin School. 
Arvilla L. Reader, 4th year, 216 Appleton street - - 187 1 $ 600 

Grace F. Ward, 5th year, 6 Appleton place - - - 1893 600 

FRANKLIN SCHOOL. 

Corner Branch and Middlesex Streets. 

Sarah C. Fiske, Principal, 3d year, 246 Appleton stieet - 1866 $ 650 

Lizzie S.- Lowe, 2d year, 13 Nichols street - 1857 600 

Marion J. Stevenson, 1st and 2d years, 63 Princeton street 1878 600 

Kate G. Jones, 1st year, 119 Andover street - - - 1880 600 

PINE STREET SCHOOL. 

Corner Pine and Gibson Streets. 
Carrie J. Bailey, Principal, 3d year, 16 Loring street 
Grace I. Washburn, 2d year, 15 Loring street - 
Helen D. Swain, 1st year, 180 Pawtucket street 



1884 


$ 625 


1897 


600 


1904 


500 



ROLL OF TEACHERS. 89 

DOVER STREET SCHOOL. 

Dover Street, between Middlesex and Grove Streets. 

Clara B. Horne, Principal, 3d year, 87 South Highland street 1877 $ 650 

Clementine H. Bowers, 2d year, 18 Loring street - - 1876 600 

Bertha Gardner, 1st year, 32 Robbins street - - - 1887 600 

MIDDLESEX VILLAGE SCHOOL. 

Middlesex Street, corner Cornell Street. 

Harriet F. Wakefield, Principal, 5th and 6th years 

2 Loring street 1889 $ 650 

Katherine G. Egan, 3d and 4th years, 17 Princeton street 1904 500 

Gertrude E. Dane, temp., 1st and 2d years, 2 Wellington sq. 

POWELL STREET SCHOOL. 

Powell Street, near Liberty Street. 

Viola A. HAMBLETT, Principal, 1st and 2d years, 463 School 

street - - . - - - - - - - - 1876 $ 625 

Ellen J. Piper, 2d and 3d years, 55 Norcross street - - 1894 600 

ABRAHAM LINCOLN GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 

Chelmsford Street. 
James L. Mellen Master, 74 Pentucket avenue - 
Margaret M. Sparks, 9th year, 11 Fort Hill avenue - 
Grace Scribner, 8th year, 190 Liberty street 
Bride T. Sweeney, 7th year, 138 Pleasant street 
Irma V. Hodgman, 7th year, 239 Stevens street - 
Helen J. O'Hearn, 6th year, 649 Westford street 
Alice L. Gookin, 6th year, Wamesit - 
Margaret G. McDonald, 5th year, 101 Grand street 
Esther M. Downing, 5th year, 674 Broadway 
Ellen L. Floyd, 4th year, 124 Stevens street 
Ella E. Prescott, 4th year, 71 Bellevue street - 

Primaries in Lincoln School Building. 

Elsie M. PUFFER, 1st year, 942 Middlesex street - 
Sadie M. Deane, 1st year, 82 B street 



1893 


$2000 


1894 


600 


1893 


600 


1900 


£00 


1897 


600 


1900 


600 


1902 


600 


1904 


500 


1904 


500 


1887 


600 


1894 


600 


1901 


600 


1902 


600 



90 ROLL OF TEACHERS. 

HOWARD STREET SCHOOL. 

Howard Street, between Chelmsford and Hale Streets. 

Marion E. Greene, Principal, 3d year, 96 Pine street - 1884 $ 650 

Margaret S. Jamieson, 2d year, 112 Shaw street - - 1904 500 

GRAND STREET SCHOOL. 

'Howard Street Annex.) 

Grand Street, between Westford and Middlesex Streets. 

Jennie M. Bennett, 1st and 2d years, 24 Bellevue street - 1885 $ 600 

Corinna G. Cover, 1st year, 16 Lombard street - - - 1901 600 

PLAIN STREET SCHOOL. 

Corner Plain and Powell Streets. 

Flora H. Sprague, Principal, 3d year, 589 School street - 1882 $ 650 

Mary A. Farnham, 2d and 3d years, 90 Gates street - - 1887 600 

Lilla M. Stanley, 2d year, 2 Horn street - - - 1897 600 

Minnie A. Willson, 1st and 2d years, 28 Cambridge street 1887 600 

Lena M. Robinson, 1st year, 68 So. Walker street - - 1898 600 

* 

MOODY GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 
Corner High and Rogers Streets. 

William S.. Greene, Master, 454 Andover street 

Mercena F. Whitehorn, 9th year, 268 E. Merrimack street 1877 

Carrie A. Paul, 8th year, 11 Porter street 

Ida L. Samuels, 7th year, 56 Fifth avenue 

Ella M. Breen, 6th year, 23 Marsh street 

Frances E. Hardman, 5th and 6th years, 263 Fairmount 
street ---------- 

Frances E. Garrity, 5th year, 34 Read street 

Nellie C. Mahoney, 4th year, 17 North street 

Flora A. Owen, 4th year, 11 Porter street 

Martina F. McMahon, temp., 33 Mead street. 



1883 


$2000 


1877 


600 


1891 . 


600 


1898 


600 


1893 


600 


1873 


600 


1874 


600 


1898 


600 


1900 


600 



ROLL OF TEACHERS. 91 

POND STREET SCHOOL. 

Corner High and Pond Streets. 

Marietta Hill, Principal, 3d year, 278 East Merrimack street 1870 $ 650 

Winifred Haggerty, 2d year, 52 Huntington street - 1884 600 

Adelaide Crowley, 1st year, 115 Fort Hill avenue - 1894 600 

HIGH STREET SCHOOL 

High Stree t, between Chestnut and Everett Streets. 

Clara A. Emerson, Principal, 2d and 3d years, 216 

Appleton street 1869 $ 625 

Maude E. Green, 1st year, 238 East Merrimack street - 1900 600 

' FAYETTE STREET SCHOOL. 

Fayette Street, between Chestnut and Everett Streets. 

Georgia A. Harnden, Principal, 2d and 3d years, 149 

Pleasant street 1885 $ 625 

Mabel C. Walsh, temp., 1st and 2d year, 145 Mammoth road 
SYCAMORE STREET SCHOOL. 

Sycamore Street- 

Florence E. Rowell, Principal, 1st, 2d and 3d years, 

356 East Merrimack street 1900 $ 625 

PAWTUCKET GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 

Mammoth Road, Pawtucketville. 
William P. Barry, Master, 1280 Middlesex street 
Ellen M. MacDonald, 9th year, 210 School street 
Carrie M. Hart, 8th year, 16 Varney street 
Elizabeth A. Hart, 7th year, 16 Varney street - 
Charlotte C. Walsh, 6th year, 76 Mt. Vernon street 
Julia M. Healey, 5th year, 11 Warwick street - 
Goldie M. Gardner, 4th year, 15 Columbus avenue - 
Maude E. Moody, temp., 4th and 6th years, 25 Lane street 

NEW MOODY STREET SCHOOL. 

New Moody Street. 
Ellen M. Holden, Principal, 3d year, 21 Eighth avenue - 1876 $ 650 

Eugenia L. Hogan, 2d year, 182 Mt. Vernon street - - 1889 600 



1887 


$2000 


1878 


600 


1887 


600 


1886 


600 


1902 


600 


1870 


600 


1898 


600 



9 2 



ROLL OF TEACHERS. 



Nellie F. Davidson, 2d and 3d years, 20 Lombard street 
Alice B. Besse, 2d year, 581 Rogers street - 
Maude M. Hardy, 1st year, 31 Fourth avenue - 
Anna I. Cassidy, 1st year, 4 Fifth avenue - 

LEXINGTON AVENUE. 

Lexington Avenue, near Varnum Avenue. 
Helen Kohawn, ungraded, 63 Thirteenth street 






TRAINING SCHOOL. 



Charles and Lawrence Streets. 
( Telephone 531-3) 

Gertrude Edmund, Principal 

Mabel W. Ewings, 3 Astor street .... 

Addie B. Merrill, 465 Bridge street ... - 
Helen M. Shean, ii Fort Hill avenue ... 

Margaret C. Fox, 9th year, 8 Eddy street ... 
Grace C. Delaney, 2d year, 791 Broadway - 
Mabel H. Ela, 407 Walker street - 

Harriet L. Wheeler, 3d year, 47 Belmont avenue 
Mary E. 6now, 1st year, 89 School street ... 
Addie E, Edwards, 550 Westford street ... 

Mary Cassidy, 44 B street - 

Ellen F. Cull, 46 Tyler street ----- 

Margaret L. Hagerty, 46 Tyler street 

Annie E. Irving, 119 West street ... - 

Christine M. Kane, 723 Central street 

Edith B. Kelley, 15 Alder street ... - 

Mabel A. Metcalf, 93 Vernon street - 

Elizabeth Provencher, 376 Hildreth street 

Harriet B. Whittaker, Tyngsborough - 

CENTRAL STREET SCHOOL. 

Central Street, opposite Hudson Street. 
Eliza Cowley, Principal, 3d year, 484 Rogers street - 
Elizabeth G. Lawler, 2d year, 260 High street - 



1891 


600 


1891 


600 


1901 


600 


1902 


600 



1877 



1857 
1897 



$ 625 



1895 


$2000 


1891 


900 


1892 


900 


1891 


900 


1900 


600 


1900 


600 


1900 


600 


1900 


600 


1 901 


600 


1900 


600 



$ 650 

600 



ROLL OF TEACHERS. 93 

Anna T. Coburn, ist and 2d years, 27 Methuen St. - - 1904 500 

Helen A. Drury, ist year, 44 Walnut street ... 1897 600 

AMES STREET SCHOOL. 
Corner Lawrence and Ames Street. 

Amanda M. Hadley, Principal, 3d year, 89 Washington 

street 1870 $ 650 

Kate F. Murphy, 2d year, 870 Gorham street - 1885 600 

Mary E. Drew, ist and 2d years, 36 Wamesit street - - 1868 600 

Edith Farrington, temp., ist year, 182 Perry sjreet - 

VARNUM GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 

Myrtle Street, Centralville. 
Telephone 75-2. 

Henry H. Harris, Master, 151 Eleventh street - 
Elizabeth C. Kennedy, 9th year, 42 Eighteenth street 
Mary F. Wing, 9th year, 95 Myrtle street - 
Agnes Bailey, 8th year, 53 Third street 
Daisy B. MacBrayne, 8th year, 24 Beech street - 
Grace W. Balch, 7th year, 434 Westford street - 
Elizabeth T. Moore, 7th year, 21 Burlington avenue 
Elizabeth M. Butler, 6th year, 142 Third street 
Mary A. Fay, 6th year, 303 Tenth street ... 
Agnes T. Fay, 6th year, 303 Tenth street ... 
Elizabeth F. Garra, 5th year, 109 Bartlett street 
Alice R. Keese, 5th year, 22 Chester street 
Ada E. Hoole, 5th year, 173 Warren street - 
Rose A. Dowd, 5th year, 237 Tenth street - 
Julia Williams, 4th year, 156 Sixth street ... 
Margaret F. Howe, 4th year, 208 South street - 
Mary E. Thomas, 4th year, 40 West Sixth street - 
Annie V. Donoghue, 4th year, 104 Lawrence street - 



1893 


$2000 


1884 


600 


1879 


600 


1900 


600 


1900* 


600 


1894 


600 


1901 


600 


1901 


600 


1898 


600 


1891 


600 


1893 


600 


1881 


600 


1894 


600 


1884 


600 


1886 


600 


1900 


600 


1902 


600 


1904 


500 



1879 


$ 650 


1889 


600 


1887 


600 


1869 


600 



94 ROLL OF TEACHERS. 

WEST SIXTH STREET. 

West Sixth Street, between Coburn and Jewett Streets, Centralville. 

Stella J. Allen, Principal, 3d year, 115 Third street - - 1879 $ 5° 

Lizzie F. Lamere, 2d and 3d years, 63 Canton street - - 1887 600 

Marion S. Keyes, 1st and 2d years, 102 Third street - - 1888 600 

Mary J, Callahan, 1st year, 117 Durant street - - - 1895 DO ° 

TENTH STREET SCHOOL. 

Corner Tenth and Varnum Streets, Centralville. 
Mary F. Beane, Principal, 3d year, 212 Tenth street - 
Fannie R. Murphy, 2d year, 42 Twelfth street - 
Alice A. Holtham, 1st and 2d years, 1107 Bridge street 
Ella A. Bailey, 1st year, 128 Sixth street ... - 

LAKEVIEW AVENUE SCHOOL. 

Lakeview Avenue, Centralville. 

Margaret J. McCluskey, Principal, 3d year, 246 Methuen 
street ---------- 

Martha Rogers, 2d year, 131 Cumberland road - 

M. Josephine Donehue, 2d year, 891 Bridge street 

Gertrude C. Ring, 1st year, 11 Woodward avenue 

Mary G. Courtney, 1st year, 75 Chestnut street 

Mary E, Meehan, 1st year, 215 Worthen street 

BILLINGS STREET SCHOOL. 

Malvina Lamere, Principal, 1st year, 6 West Eleventh street 1894 $ 650 

Annie M. Robbins, 3d year, 62 Twelfth street - - 1895 600 

Etta Foye, 2d year, 201 Market street - - 1901 600 



1890 


$ 650 


1895 


600 


1900 


600 


1898 


600 


1904 


500 


1891 


600 



ROLL OF TEACHERS. 95 



KINDERGARTENS. 

AGAWAM STREET. 

Sarah G. Sparks, Principal, 59 Elm street - - 1894 $ 500 

Rosemary Lennon, 39 Carter street - - - - 1895 450 

BARTLETT SCHOOL. 
E. Belle Perham, Principal, 90 Riverside street - 1893 5°° 

Edith A. Andrews, 77 Fort Hill avenue - - - 1897 45° 

CHARLES STREET. 
Mabel D. Nickerson, Principal, 136 Chestnut street - 1893 500 

M. Ethel Baker, 290 East Merrimack street - - - 1899 450 

CHAPEL STREET. 

Marietta G. Gormley, Principal, 22 Lyon street - - 1895 5°° 

Katherine C. Earley, 17 Pleasant street - - - 1896 450 

DOVER STREET. 

Elizabeth A. Wilson. Principal, 15 South Canton street - 1893 5°° 

Ella M. Penn, 262 London street - 1901 450 

FRANKLIN SCHOOL. 
N. Grace Taylor, Principal, 7 Ware street - 1895 500 

Hortense M. Lamere, 6 West Eleventh street - - 1899 450 

LINCOLN SCHOOL. 

Elsie M. Cragin, Principal, 114 South Walker street - 1895 500 

Gertrude A. Roberts, 74 Stevens street - - - 1897 450 

MOODY SCHOOL. 

Mary C. Walker, Principal, 100 Appleton street - - 1893 5°° 

Alice F. Seeton, 158 Mammoth road .... 1901 450 



1896 


500 


1 899 


450 


1895 


500 


1896 


45° 



96 ROLL OF TEACHERS. 

MORRILL SCHOOL. 

Helen W. Noyes, Principal, 49 Nesmith street - 
S. Alice Knapp, 336 East Merrimack street 

PAWTUCKET. 

M. Marietta King, Principal, 205 Stackpole street 
S. Hortense Tabor, 82 Riverside street 

PLAIN STREET. 
Edith A. Howitt, Principal, 52 Myrtle street - - - 1897 500 

Agnes E. Coburn, 47 Twelfth street - 1901 450 

PINE STREET. 
Louie I. Smith, Principal, 94 Princeton street - - - 1895 500 

VARNUM SCHOOL. 

Nettie M. Conant, Principal, 93 Vernon street - 
Clara M. Everett, 945 Middlesex street 

SUPERVISOR OF KINDERGARTENS. 

Anna W. Devereaux, Tel. 957, 9 Nesmith street 

MUSICAL DIRECTOR. 
Frederick O. Blunt, Tel. 1 153-2, 409 Westford street 

'assistant IN MUSIC. 
Josephine C. Coburn, Tel. 947-12, 25 Fifth street - 1903 700 

TEACHERS OF DRAWING. 
Olive E. Underhill, 117 Branch street - - - 1887 750 

Edmund Ketchum, 19 Paige street - ... 1904 750 

TEACHER OF SEWING. 
Ida J. Flint, 200 Liberty street 1880 800 

MILITARY INSTRUCTOR. 
Colby T. Kittredge, 14 Ralph street - 1901 500 

ABSENT ON LEAVE. 

Elizabeth F. Blandin - - Vamum 

Alice M. Magoon --------- Varnum 



1892 


500 


1896 


45° 


1893 


500 


1898 


1250 



ROLL OF TEACHERS. 97 



TRAINING SCHOOL GRADUATES. 

CLASS OF JUNE, 1902. 

Mary E. Crowley, 436 Lincoln street. 

Gertrude E. Dane, 2 Wellington square. 

Helen A. Dow, 149 B street. 

Ethel M. Everett, 12 Belmont street. 

Edith Farrington, 182 Perry street. 

Martina F. McMahon, 33 Mead street. 

E. Laura Moore, 48 Hastings street. 

Elizabeth Murphy, 159 Third avenue. 

Catherine G. O'Sullivan, 105 Mt. Washington street. 

Alice Richardson, 213 Branch street. 

Mabel C. Walsh, 145 Mammoth road. 

Loretta L. Ward, 220 Fletcher street, 

CLASS OF JUNE, 1903.' 

Alice H. Bacheller, 25 Nesmith street. 
Avis J. Coburn, 145 Beacon street. 
Mary H. Coburn, 145 Beacon street. 
Edith V. Cockerille, 210 School street. 
Bessie F. Davidson, 64 Warwick street. 
Rebecca A. Gardner, 75 Pine street. 
Anna F. Joyce, 22 Twelfth street. 
Annie L. Mahoney, 41 Butterfield street. 
Maude E. Moody, 25 Lane street. 
Mary G. Quinn, 28 Chapel street. 
M. Gertrude Seede, 85 Dover street. 
Lillian A. Strout, in So. Loring street. 
Mary E. Tobin. 40 Linden street. 



98 ROLL OF TEACHERS. 

CLASS OF JUNE, 1904. 

Hannah M. Barrows, 19 Newhall street. 
Christine Cameron, 872 Mammoth road, Dracut. 
Marguerite Elvin, 258 Varnum avenue. 
Esther M. Greene, 179 Warwick street. 
Carrie E. Hale, 15 Robbins street. 
Lisbeth D. Mann, 235 Walker street. 
Caroline McGarvey, 34 Laurel street. . 
Alice E. Ramsay, 58 Fremont street. 
Elizabeth H. Seede, 85 Dover street. 
Etta M. Smith, mo Lawrence street. 



ROLL OF TEACHERS. 99 



TEACHERS' CERTIFICATES 

Granted since January i, 1902. 

FIRST GRADE. 
Wm. Hanson Howard, Dartmouth, '02, 40 Arlington street. 
Wm. A. Martin, Ottawa, '02, 153 High street. 
Michael A. Tighe, Boston College, '03, 31 Hovey avenue. 
Elmer Garfield Brennon, Dartmouth, '04, 71 Robbins street. 
Harold R. Wade, Harvard, 278 East Merrimack street. 

SECOND GRADE. 

Elizabeth Murphy, Boston University, '01, 159 Third avenue. 

Alice Richardson, Smith, 'oi, 213 Branch street. 

Ethel M. Everett, Wellesley, '01, 12 Belmont Street. 

Alice H. Batcheller, Vassar, '02, 25 Nesmith street. 

Susan G. Burbank, Boston University, '02, 130 Bowers street. 

Mary H. Coburn, Smith, '02, 145 Beacon street. 

Avis J. Coburn, Smith, '02, 145 Beacon street. 

Bessie F. Davidson, Boston University, '02, 64 Warwick street. 

Lucy M. Stevenson, Technology, '03, 45 Princeton street. 

Annie Louise Hall, Vassar, '03, 48 Wannalancit street. 

Margaret W. Hall, Vassar, '03, 48 Wannalancit street. 

Lisbeth D. Mann, Acadia University, 235 Walker street. 

Mabel A. Metcalf, Wellesley, '03, 93 Vernon street. 

FOURTH GRADE. 
Mary I. Halloran, Normal School, 01, 546 East Merrimack street. 
Gertrude B. Crowley, Normal School, '01, 115 Fort Hill avenue. 
Julia M. Adams Normal School, '02, Haverhill, Mass. 
Alda L. Armstrong, Normal School, '02, Littleton, N. H. 
Mina Guyton, Normal School, '02, 45 Fourth avenue. 



IOO 



SALARIES OF TEACHERS. 



SALARIES OF TEACHERS. 



HIGH SCHOOL. 

Head Master -__.. $3000 

First Sub-Master 2200 

Men Teachers 800 to 1800 

Women Teachers, first year --------- 650 

Women Teachers, second year - - - - - - ' - 700 

Women Teachers, third year and thereafter - 800 to 1000 

GRAMMAR SCHOOLS 

Masters - - - $1300 to 2000 

Assistants, first year __- ..-•___ 450 

Assistants, second year - - - - » - - - - 500 

Assistants, third year and after - - 600 

Teacher of Drawing .__-...._ 1250 

Teacher of Music _-__.----_ 1250 

PRIMARY SCHOOLS 

Teachers, first year --__.-.__ $450 

Teachers, second year ---------- 500 

Teachers, third year and after --------- 600 

Principals of two rooms --------- 625 

Principals of three rooms or more -----.-. 650 

TRAINING SCHOOL 

Principal _.. $2000 

Three Assistants ----------- 900 

KINDERGARTENS 

Principals ------ $500 

Assistants, first year --_----,-- 350 

Assistants, after first year 450 

TEMPORARY TEACHERS 

Men Teachers per day $3 00 

Women Teachers in High School per day - - - - - -2 50 

Women Teachers in Primary and Grammar Schools per day - - 2 25 



TEXT BOOKS. 



IOI 



TEXT BOOKS USED IN THE 
PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 

PRIMARY SCHOOLS. 



First Readers, Fifteen Series 
Second Readers, Fifteen Series 
Advanced Second and Third 

Readers, Fifteen Series 
Franklin Primary Arithmetic 
Prince's Arithmetic by Grades 



Davis's Stories of American History 
Carroll's Around the World, Book I 
Monroe's Reading Chart 
American Music Reader 
American Music Chart 
Blaisdell's Child's Book of Health 



Nichols' Graded Lessons in Number Heath's Vertical Writing Books. 



GRAMMAR SCHOOLS. 



Third Readers, Several Series 
Fourth Readers, Several Series 
Fifth Readers, Several Series 
Scudder's Fables and Folk Stories 
De Foe's Robinson Crusoe 
Burrough's Birds and Bees 
Hawthorne's Wonder Book 
American Literature, Masterpieces 
Bradbury's Eaton's Arithmetic 
Werner's Arithmetic, Book III 
Carpenter's Geographical Readers 
Carroll's Around the World, Book II 
Lewis's First Manual of Composition 
Union Series of Physiologies 
Wentworth's First Steps in Algebra 
Worcester's New Pronouncing 

Speller 
The Morse Speller 
The Rational Spelling Book 
Reed's Word Lessons 



The Mother Tongue, Books I and II 
Frye's Primary Geography 
Frye's Common School Geography 
Eggleston's First Book in American 

History 
Scudder's History and Short History 

of the United States 
Fiske's History of the United States 
Thomas's History of the United 

States 
Montgomery's Histories of the United 

States 
Guerber's Story of the Greeks 
Guerber's Story of the English 
Worcester's Comprehensive 

Dictionary 
Werner's Mental Arithmetic 
Heath's Vertical Writing Books 
American Music Readers 



102 



TEXT BOOKS. 



HIGH SCHOOL. 

Chemistry, Physics and Other Sciences. 
Experimental Chemistry, Newell 



Qualitative Analysis, Irish 

A Text-book of Physics, Hall-Bergen 

Elements of Physics, Avery 

Botany, Gray 

Geology, Le Conte 

Physics, Gilley 

Elements of Chemistry, Williams 

Herbarium, Wilson 

Lessons in Astronomy, Young 



Physics, Hoadley 
Physiology, Kellogg 
Physiology, Overton 
Physiology, Blaisdell 
Physiology, Foster and Shore 
Physiology, Martin 
Physiology, Walker 
Physiology, Colton 
Tarr's Physical Geography 
Geology, Brigham 



Ancient Mariner, Coleridge 
Carlyle's Essay on Burns 
Chaucer to Arnold, George 
Conciliation with America, Burke 
Composition and Rhetoric, Scott 

and Denney 
Eliot's Silas Marner, Norris 
English Composition, Shaw 
Foundations of Rhetoric, Hill 
Hill's Principles of Rhetoric 
Silas Marner, Eliot 
Sir Roger de Coverly Papers, 

Addison 
Story of the Odyssey, Church 
Tales from Shakespeare, Lamb . 



English. 

Iliad, Pope 
Iliad, Bryant 
Ivanhoe, Scott 
Julius Caesar, Shakespeare 
Lessons in English, Buehler 
Macbeth, Shakespeare 
Marmion, Scott 

Merchant of Venice, Shakespeare 
Milton and Addison, Macaulay 
Milton's Lyrics 
The Princess, Tennyson 
Vicar of Wakefield, Goldsmith 
Introduction to English Literature. 
Pancoast 



Capi et sa Troupe 

College Plays, Bocher 

Colomba, Merim6e 

Le Cid, ( Corneille ) 

Contes et L^gendes, Guerber 

Douze Contes Nouveaux, Fontaine 



French. 

French Dictionary, Heath 
French Grammar, Grandgent 
French Grammar, Fraser and 

Squair 
French Grammar, Worman 
French Lyrics, Bowen 



French Reader for Beginners, Kuhns French Reader, Super 



TEXT BOOKS. 



IO3 



Exercises No. 1, Grandgent 
La Famille de Germandre, Sand 
La Fontaine's Fables, Mme. Beck's 

Edition 
La Si6ge de Berlin 
La Tache du Petit Pierre 
Le Voyage de Monsieur Perrichon, 

Labiche 
French Composition, Grandgent 
Sight Reading, Rogers 
La Grammaire, Labiche 
Scenes de la Revolution Francaise, 

Lamartine 
Le Dix Septieme Siecle 



Grammaire Francaise, Larive et 

Fleury, 2tne An. 
French Syntax and Composition, 

Bovet 
Le Consent de 1813, Erckmann- 

Chatrain 
Le Cure de Tours, Balzac 
M6thode Berlitz, Part I 
Pecheur d'Islande, Loti 
Readings from French History 

Super 
Selected Stories, Daudet 
L'Expedition de Bonaparte en Egypte, 

Thiers 
French Commercial Reader, Pitman 



Hoher als die Kirche, Clary 
German Composition, Fasnacht 
Traumereien, Leander 
Heise's L'Arrabiata 
Harris' German Lessons 



German. 

German Dictionary, Heath 
Der Zerbrochne Krug, Joyne's 
Schiller's Dreissigjahrige, Krieg 
Schiller's Der Nefe Als Onkel 
Joynes Meissuer's German Grammar 



Wesselhoefts' German Composition Riehl's Der Fluchder Schonheit 
Harris' German Composition Gold's Tales from Hauff 

Immensee, Storm's Dippold's Scientific German 

Schiller's Jungfrau von Orleans 



Anabasis 

Greek Composition, Higley 
Greek Composition, Woodruff 
Greek Grammar, Goodwin 
Greek Lessons, White 



Greek. 

Greek Lexicon, Liddell and Scott 
Greek Lexicon, White 
Greek Reader, Goodwin 
Homer's Iliad, Seymour 
Homer's Odyssey, Seymour 



History. 

Age of Pericles, Grant Greek Civilization, Mahaffy 

American History, Montgomery History of England, Coman and 

Ancient History, Myers Kendall 

English History, Montgomery History of English People, Green 



io4 



TEXT BOOKS. 



English History, Higginson and 

Channing 
European History, Adams 
Fiske's School Histories 
General History, Myers 
Greek History, Oman 
Greek History, Botsford 
Greek Tragedians, Church 



L 



Caesar, Allen and Greenough 
Cicero, Allen and Greenough 
Crate to Caesar, Collar 
Latin Composition, Part I, Daniell 
Latin Composition, Part II, Daniell 
Latin Composition, Collar 
Latin, for Sight Reading, Tomlinson 
Latin Grammar, Allen and 
Greenough 



History of Rome, Allen 
Johnston's American History 
Plutarch's Lives, Kaufman 
Source Book, Hart 
U. S. History, McMaster 
U, S. History, Channing 
U. S. History, Scudder 

vtin. 

Latin Lexicon, White 

Nepos, Barss 

New Latin Composition 

Ovid, Allen and Greenough 

Sallust 

Virgil, Allen and Greenough 

Virgil, Brice 

Viri Romae, Rolfe 

First Year Latin, Collar and Daniell 



Mathematics. 

Academic Algebra, Wells Geometry, Wells 

Arithmetic, Wentworth and Hill Higher Algebra, Wells 

Geometry, Plane and Solid, Went- Surveying, Davies 

worth Trigonometry, Wentworth 

Commercial. 

Commercial Geography, Adams Commercial Arithmetic, Williams 

Mental Arithmetic, Williams and and Rogers 

Rogers Commercial Law, White 

Business Correspondence, Williams Bookkeeping and Business Practice, 

and Rogers Williams and Rogers 

Seventy Lessons in Spelling, Shorthand, Gregg 

Williams and Rogers 



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AUDITOR'S 



Sixty -Ninth Annual Report 



OF THE 



Receipts and Expenditures 



OF THE 



CITY OF LOWELL, MASS. 



TOGETHER WITH THE 



Treasurer's Account and the Account of the Commis- 
sioners of Sinking Funds, for the Financial 
Year Ending December 31, 1904. 



LOWELL, MASS.: 

Buck land Printing Company, 

1905. 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 



OF THE 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 



For the Year Ending Dec, 31, 1904. 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



City of Lowell. 
Auditor's Office, January 1, 1905. 
To the City Council: 

Gentlemen: — In conformity with the re- 
quirements of the Ordinances of the City, I 
have the honor to present the Sixty-Ninth 
Annual Report of the Receipts and Expen- 
ditures of the City of Lowell for the year 
ending December 31, 1904, exhibiting the same 
as classified in the several department accounts, 
with the value of Real and Personal Property 
in charge of the several departments, and a 
statement of the City Debt and the Debt due 
the City. 

RECEIPTS. 

The whole amount of money re- 
ceived into the City Treasury 
from all sources from January 1 
to Dec. 31, 1904, was $3,785,132 55 



$3,785,132 55 



AUDITOR S REPORT. 



RECEIPTS— Continued. 



Of this amount there was received 
on account of 



General Treasury Fund, Taxes. . . . 

General Treasury Fund, Loans . . . 

General Treasury Fund, Revenue. . 

Engineering 

Fire Department, Sundries 

Health, Office Sundries 

Health, Yard Labor 

Inspector of Wires, Sundries 

Parks, Sundries 

Lowell City Hospital, Grain, Gro- 
ceries and Provisions 

Lowell City Hospital, Sundries .... 

Paupers, Outdoor Relief, General 
Sundries 

Police, Salaries and Labor 

Public Buildings, Carpenters, Pain- 
ters, etc 

Public Buildings, Bills for Materials 

Schools 

School Houses Labor 

School Houses Sundries, work not 
done by Dept. and Bills for 
Materials 

Sewer Maintenance, Labor 

Sundries 

Sewer Construction 

Soldiers' Relief 

State Aid 

Streets Yard Labor 

Streets Labor 

Streets Sundries 

Watering Streets Labor 

Watering Streets Sundries 

Water Works 

City Debt 

Fourth of July Observance 



$1,494,770 49 

1,554,414 00 

414.539 94 

7,755 12 

185 33 

175 70 

163 75 

09 

94 59 

8,745 36 
1,311 00 

136 20 

2,206 51 

1,272 81 
49 60 
13 60 

1,120 44 



1,119 01 

509 54 

3,208 43 

16 00 

48 00 

50 00 

533 55 

83 10 

2,318 46 

28 00 

1.372 00 

197,073 64 

91,810 29 

8 00 



$3,785,132 55 



AUDITOR S REPORT. 



EXPENDITURES. 



The whole amount expended and 
ordered to be paid from the 
Treasury from Jan. 1, to Dec. 
31, 1904 was $3,096,273 32 



$3,696,273 32 



The expenditures were charged to 
the following appropriations or 
accounts : 



Abatement of Taxes $ 48,496 19 

Assessors, Salaries 12,534 13 

Sundries 1,147 58 

Auditor, Salaries 3,527 00 

Sundries 440 84 

Care of City Hall, Labor 5,325 00 

Police Officer 1,006 50 

Sundries 900 00 

City Cemeteries 8,971 63 

L ity Clerk, Salaries 4, 628 00 

Sundries 1,063 03 

City Treasurer, Salaries 7,340 00 

Sundries 4,022 85 

City Sealer, Salary 350 00 

Sundries 66 65 

City Weigher, Salaries 800 00 

Sundries 18 50 

City Messenger, Salary 1,200 00 

Sundries 399 89 

Lighting City Hall and 

Memorial Building 1,550 16 

Clerk of Committees, Salary 1,200 00 

Sundries 140 85 

Clerk of Common Council 300 00 

Elections 13,302 25 

Engineering 15.033 45 

Fire Department Salaries and Labor 109,854 23 

Sundries 24,449 85 

Fish Warden 40 00 

Pound Keeper 2 92 

Health Office, Salaries and Labor. . 9,135 00 

Sundries 2,621 26 



AUDITOR S REPORT. 



EXPENDITURES— Continued. 



Yard Labor 

Yard Sundries 

Heating City Hall and Memorial 
Building, Labor 

Fuel 

Sundries 

Huntington Hall 

Rifle Range Janitor . . . . 

Taxes 

Targets, Pasters and Sup- 
plies 

Repairs 

Improvements at Range . . 

Incidentals 

Insurance 

Inspector of Milk and Vinegar, 

Salaries 

Sundries 

Inspector of Animals and Provisions 
Inspector of Wires, Salaries 

Sundries 

Law Salaries 

Sundries 

Library 

Lighting Streets 

Public Buildings 

Sundries 

Liquor Licenses 

Mayor, Salaries 

Sundries 

Stenography and extra 

Clerk hire 

Parks Salaries and Labor 

Sundries 

Lowell City Hospital and Alms- 
house, Salaries 

Labor 

Grain Groceries and Pro- 
visions 

Sundries 

Paupers, Out-Door Relief Salaries. 

Office Sundries and Trans- 
portation 

General Sundries. ...... 



28,637 


26 


5,048 


43 


2,984 


00 


4,300 


00 


644 


38 


4,556 


08 


456 


13 


79 


45 


83 


63 


71 


66 


299 


94 


2,573 


61 


5,287 


77 


2,206 


50 


138 


37 


500 


00 


2,128 


00 


737 


74 


4,828 


01 


714 


24 


16,000 


00 


101,201 


39 


20 


34 


147 


37 


42,974 


00 


4,200 


00 


186 


22 


7 


25 


8,551 


38 


3,544 


48 


2,700 


00 


12,618 


48 


32,627 


38 


23,675 


17 


3,785 


00 


825 


86 


48,496 


15 



AUDITOR S REPORT. 



EXPENDITURES— Continued. 



Police, Salaries of Police Board and 

Clerk 5,000 00 

Salaries and Labor. 132.482 13 

Sundries . 7,099 34 

Public Buildings, Salaries 2,268 00 

Janitor Police Station 912 50 

Assistant Janitor Police 

Station 818 97 

Janitor Memorial Building 702 00 

Carpenters, Painters, etc. . 8,239 00 

Board of Horses 1,264 94 

Electric Power at Shop.. . 254 76 

Work not done by Dept. . 5,087 16 

Materials 4,043 52 

Repairing Palmer St. En- 
gine House . 1,500 00 

New Boiler at Branch St. 

Engine House 

Painting City Hall 

Resetting and Repairing 

Boiler at City Hall 

Almshouse Repairs 

Registrars of Voters, Salaries and 

Labor 

Sundries 

Schools 

School Houses, Labor 

Janitors 

Bills for work not done by 

Dept. and Bills for 

Materials ... 

New Chimney at Highland 

School 

Concrete Chapel, Cheever 

and Cottage St. School 

Basements 

New Boiler Lyon St. 

School 

New Boiler at Training 

School 

Repairing Fuller & Warren 

Furnaces in various 

schools 

Sewer Maintenance, Salaries 



499 

278 


98 
55 


1,499 
2,499 


98 

81 


3,261 25 

824 26 

299,532 79 

11,580 19 

40,606 73 


11,590 


02 


125 


00 


200 


00 


500 


00 


499 


97 


980 
2,896 


52 

27 



10 auditor's report. 

EXPENDITURES— Continued. 



Labor 12,451 57 

Sundries 11,767 06 

Sewer Construction 115,989 42 

State Aid, Salaries and Sundries. . . 2,107 14 

Military Aid 3,931 00 

Soldiers Relief 9,071 04 

State Aid . . 14,937 50 

Streets, Salaries - 4.000 00 

Yard Labor 11,501 94 

Labor 131,589 46 

Sidewalk Repairs. 4,999 20 

Sundries 53,503 58 

New Sidewalks 8,405 40 

Supply Salaries 5,444 58 

Sundries * 922 63 

Watering Streets, Labor 5,011 71 

Sundries 11,844 06 

State Supervisors 824 00 

Water Works 181,298 24 

Temporary Loans 1,200.000 00 

Edson Cemetery Annex. 654 64 

Bennett Portrait 300 00 

Butler Portrait 300 00 

Tax Cases 292 50 

Laying out, grading and extending 

By street- •• v 2,483 13 

Taxes 335 80 

Health, Small Pox 1,010 02 

Parks, Care of Trees 999 99 

Middlesex Village School Bell 307 88 

City Debt 367,390 79 

Interest 117,289 93 

Sinking Funds 38.300 00 

Corporation Tax , . . . . 46 32 

National Bank Tax 11,603 35 

Memorial Day G. A. R.... .... 1,000 00 

Spanish War Veterans ... 200 00 

Fourth of July Observance 2,640 32 

Band Concerts 650 00 

Lowell Textile School 8,000 00 

Claims for Damages, Injuries, etc. . 1.239 00 
Fire Alarm Box, Cor. Aiken Ave. 

and Cumberland Road 150 00 

Underground Wires, Police Dept. . 1,272 81 



auditor's report. 11 

EXPENDITURES— Continued. 



Fire Dept. 

State Tax 

County Tax 

State Highway Tax 

Improving Sanitary Conditions at 
Colburn School 

New four-room Building to Relieve 
Highland School 

Sanitary Improvements in Sundry 
School Houses and new Chim- 
ney at Highland School 

Bath-rooms at Fletcher and Branch 
St. Engine Houses 

Bath-rooms, Closet and new Floor 
at Fourth St. Engine House. . . 

Repairs of Steamer 3 

Richardson Bill 

Rebates on Rent paid for Hunting- 
ton Hall 



1,311 
63,034 

78,478 
97 


67 
43 
87 
04 


1,999 


82 


2,699 


57 


599 


90 


800 


85 


599 

14 

5,400 


84 
25 
00 


420 


00 



$3,696,273 32 



CITY DEBT. 

Ordinary City Debt. Jan. 1, 1904.. $2,408,756 79 
Borrowed during the year 1904 254,414 00 

Total 2,663,170 79 

Paid during the year 1904 345,790 79 

Total Ordinary City Debt, Dec. 31, 

1904 $2,317,380 00 

Water Debt, Jan. 1, 1904 1,183,900 00 

Paid during the year 1904 21,600 00 

Total Water Debt, Dec. 31, 1904.. $1,162,300 00 

Total City Debt. Dec. 31, 1904. . . . $3,479,680 00 



12 auditor's report. 

CITY DEBT— Continued. 



Ordinary City Debt, Dee. 31, 1904, 2,317,380 00 
Sinking Funds for payment of 

same 244,017 40 

Net Ordinary City Debt, Dec. 31, 

1904 $2,073,362 60 

Water Debt, Dec. 31, 1904. ...... 1,162,300 00 

Sinking Funds for payment of 

same 406,430 22 

Net Water Debt, Dec. 31, 1904. . . 755,869 78 



Total Net Debt, Dec. 31, 1904. . . . $2,829,232 38 

Total Net Debt, Dec. 31, 1903. . . . 2,933,441 54 

Total Net Debt, Dec. 31, 1904. . . . 2,829,232 38 

Decrease in City Debt during 1904, 104.209 16 

Decrease in Net Ordinary Debt 49,684 68 



LIMIT OF INDEBTEDNESS. 

Total City Debt. Dec. 31, 1904.. . . $3,479,680 00 

Deduct Water Loans 1,162,300 00 

Deduct Exemptions by Legislature, 800,000 00 1,962,300 00 

City Debt as it relates to limit of 

indebtedness 1,517,380 00 

Limit of Municipal Debt for 1905, 
2% % of average valuation for 
last three years, $71,601,535 67 1,790,038 40 

City Debt which relates to limit 

K Dec. 31, 1904 1,517,380 00 

Distance from limit Dec. 31, 1904, 272,658 40 
Distance from limit Dec. 31, 1903, 244,270 59 

Increase of distance from limit 28,387 81 



AUDITOR S REPORT. 



13 



LOANS, 1904. 



Sewer Construction 

Underground Wires, Police Dept. . 

Fire Dept 

Streets, Labor ... 

Streets, Sundries 

Repairs of Steamer 3 

New four-room Building to Relieve 

Highland School ............. 

Sanitary Improvements in Middlesex 

Village, Powell and Training 

School, and new Chimney at 

Highland School 

Bath-rooms Fletcher and Branch 

.St. Engine Houses 

Bath-rooms, Closets, new Floor at 

Fourth St. Engine House 

City Hospital and Almshouse, 

Sundries 

Heating City Hall and Memorial 

Building, Fuel 

Richardson Bill 

Claims for Damages, Injuries, etc. . 

Elections 

Fire Dept. Salaries and Labor 

Kalsomining Material, etc 

Registrars of Voters Salaries and 

Labor 

Sundries 

Public Buildings, Board of Horses, 

School Houses, Janitor 

Health, Cremator Construction .... 
Deficiencies 

General Treasury Fund Revenue, 
Balance of $17,000 00 Loan. . 



120,000 00 
2,000 00 
2,000 00 
43,500 00 
5,000 00 
2,000 00 

2,700 00 



600 00 

800 00 

GOO 00 

4,500 00 

1.300 00 
5,400 00 
1,014 00 
7,000 00 
3,000 00 
1,175 00 

450 00 

350 00 

267 96 

4,296 78 

10,000 00 

36,000 00 



253,953 74 



462 26 



$254,414 00 



14 



AUDITOR S REPORT. 



APPROPRIATIONS, 1904. 



Assessors Salaries 

Sundries 

Auditor, Salaries 

Sundries . . v 

Cure of City Hall, Labor 

Police Officer ... ....... 

Sundries . . . . % 

City Cemeteries 

City Clerk, Salaries 

Sundries 

City Treasurer Salaries 

Sundries 

City Sealer Salary 

Sundries 

City Weigher Salary 

Sundries 

City Messenger Salary 

Sundries 

Lighting City Hall and Memorial 

Building 

Clerk of Committees Salary 

Sundrie s 

Clerk of Common Council 

Elections 

Engineering 

Fire Department, Salaries and Labor 

Sundries 

Fish Warden 

Pound Keeper 

Health Office, Salaries and Labor. . 

Sundries 

Health Yard, Labor .... 

Sundries 

Heating City Hall and Memorial 
Building, Labor 

Fuel 

Sundries 

Huntington Hall 

Rifle Ran^e Janitor 

Taxes 

Targets, Pasters, Supplies, 

Repairs .... 

Improvements at Range. . 



Annual. 


Additional. 


$12,551 00 




1,500 


00 




3,527 


00 




730 


00 




5,325 


00 




1.00G 


50 




900 


00 




9,000 00 




4,628 


00 




1.241 


00 


■ 


7,340 


00 




3,460 


00 


562 85 


350 


00 




70 


00 




800 


00 


. 


25 


00 




1,200 


00 




400 


00 




1,547 


86 


2 30 


1,200 


00 




200 


00 




300 


00 




6,500 


00 


7,000 00 


7,500 


00 




106,956 


50 • 


3.000 00 


24.835 


00 




40 


00 




5 


00 




9,161 


25 




2,200 


00 


245 56 


28,355 


00 


118 51 


5,000 


00 


* 48 43 


3,000 00 




3,000 


00 


1,300 00 


600 


00 


44 38 


4,900 


00 




456 


25 




87 


96 




84 


88 




70 


91 


75 


300 


00 





AUDITOR S REPORT. 



15 



APPROPRIATIONS— Continued. 



Incidentals 

Insurance , 

Inspector of Milk and Vinegar, 

Salaries 

Sundries 

Animals and Provisions. . 

Wires, Salaries 

Sundries .... 

Law, Salaries 

Sundries 

Library 

Lighting Streets 

Public Buildings 

Sundries 

New Lights 

Liquor Licenses 

Mayor, Salaries 

Sundries 

Stenography and extra 

Clerk hire 

Park Department Salaries and 
Labor 

Sundries 

Lowell City Hospital and Alms- 
house, Salaries 

Labor 

Grain, Groceries and Pro- 
visions 

Sundries 

Paupers, Out-door Relief, Salaries, 

Office Sundries and Trans- 
portation 

General Sundries 

Police, Salaries of Police Board and 
Clerk 

Salaries and Labor 

Sundries 

Public Buildings, Salaries 

Janitor Police Station. . . . 

Assistant Janitor Police 
Station 

Janitor Memorial Building 

Carpenters, Painters, etc. . 



Anni 


ial. 


Additional. 


2,750 


00 




5,474 


14 




2,215 


50 




200 


00 




500 


00 




2,128 


00 




500 


00 


237 65 


4,826 


00 


2 01 


800 


00 




16.000 


00 




01,645 


00 




30 


00 




300 


00 




300 


00 




43,250 


00 




4,200 


00 




400 


00 





200 00 

9,000 00 
3.000 00 

2,700 00 
11,617 89 

20,000 00 

16,500 00 

3,785 00 

800 00 
39,000 00 

5,000 00 

132,461 25 

5,500 00 

2,268 00 

912 50 

821 25 

702 00 

7,000 00 



1 38 
450 00 



1,000 59 

3,882 02 
5,864 17 



25 86 
9,359 95 



1,600 00 



16 



AUDITOR S REPORT. 



APPROPRIATIONS— Continued. 



Public Buildings Sundries, Board of 

Horses 

Electric Power at Shop. . . 
Bills, work not done by 

Dept 

Bills for Materials 

Repairing Palmer St. En- 
gine House 

New Boiler at Branch St. 

Engine House 

Painting City Hall interior 

and exterior 

Resetting and Repairing 
Boiler at City Hall.. . . 

Almshouse Repairs 

Registrars of Voters, Salaries and 

Labor 

Sundries 

Schools 

School Houses, Labor 

Janitors 

School Houses Sundries, Bills for 
work not done by Dept. and 

Bills for Materials 

New Chimney at Highland 

School 

Concrete Chapel, Checver 
and Cottage St. School 

Basements 

New Boiler Lyon St. 

^School 

New Boiler Training 

School 

Repairing Fuller & Warren 
Furnaces in various 

schools 

Sewer Maintenance, Salaries 

Labor 

Sundries 

State Aid, Salaries and Sundries. . . 

Military Aid 

Soldiers Relief 



Annual. 


Additional. 


1,000 
300 


00 
00 


267 96 


5,000 
4,000 


00 
00 


87 16 


1,500 


00 




500 


00 




500 


00 




1,500 
2,500 


00 
00 




3,000 00 

1,000 00 

280,000 00 

10,500 00 

36,313 33 


450 00 

350 00 

19,519 19 

4,296 78 


9,000 


00 


1,471 01 


125 


00 




200 00 




500 


00 




500 00 




1,000 00 
2,939 00 
12,000 00 
8,561 00 
2,200 00 
5,000 00 
9,100 00 





AUDITOR S REPORT. 



17 



APPROPRIATIONS— Continued, 



State Aid 

Streets, Salaries 

. Yard Labor 

Labor on Streets and 
Boulevard 

Sidewalk Repairs 

Sundries 

New Sidewalks 

Supply Salaries 

Sundries 

Watering Streets, Labor 

Sundries 

State Supervisors 

Health, Small Pox 

Parks, Care of Trees 

Sewer Construction 

Health Cremator Construction .... 
Middlesex Village School Bell .... 

City Debt 

Interest 

Sinking Funds 

Corporation Tax 

National Bank Tax 

Memorial Day, G. A. R 

Spanish War Veterans . . . 

Fourth of July Observance 

Band Concerts 

Lowell Textile School 

Labor Day 

Claims for Damages, Injuries, etc. . 
Fire Alarm Box, Cor. Aiken Ave. 

and Cumberland Road 

Underground Wires, Police Dept. . 

Fire Dept 

State Tax 

County Tax 

State Highway Tax 

Improving Sanitary Conditions at 

Colburn School 

New four-room Building to Relieve 
Highland School 



Annual. 


Additional. 


15,000 00 




4,000 00 




11,000 00 




90,000 00 


43,500 00 


5,000 00 




45,500 00 


5,685 12 


8,500 00 


» 


5,429 00 




875 00 




5,000 00 




10,500 00 






864 00 




1,010 02 




1,000 00 




120,000 00 




10,000 00 




500 00 


275,580 50 




135,000 00 




38,300 00 






46 32 




11,603 35 




1,000 00 




2()0 00 




3,000 00 




650 00 




8,000 00 




1,500 00 




1,239 00 




150 00 




2,000 00 




2,000 00 




63,034 43 




78,478 87 




97 04 




2,000 00 




2,700 00 



18 



AUDITOR S REPORT. 



APPROPRIATIONS— Continued. 



Annual. 



Additional. 



Sanitary Improvements in Sunday 
School Houses and new Chim- 
ney at Highland School 

Bath-rooms at Fletcher and Branch 
St. Engine Houses 

Bath-rooms, Closets and new Floor 
at Fourth St. Engine House. . . 

Repair of Steamer 3 

Richardson Bill 

Rebates on Rent paid for Hunting- 
ton Hall 





600 00 




800 85 




600 00 
2,000 00 
5,400 00 




420 00 


$1,755,563 47 


$431,330 72 







Respectfully submitted, 

DAVID CHASE, Auditor. 



APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES. 



The Amount of the Unexpended Balance of 
1903 — The Amount of the Several Ap- 
propriations Made by the City Council 
During the Year 1904 — The Amount 
Received into the Treasury from all 
Sources — The Expenditures in Detail, 
under Each Appropriation, and the Un- 
drawn Balances December 31, 1904 — Also 
the Amount of the City Debt — Debts 
Due the City — Schedules of the Value 
of Real and Personal Property, Etc. 



20 auditor's report. 



APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES 



ABATEMENT OF TAXES. 

Balance undrawn Jan. 1, 1904 $ 49,322 00 

Overlaying made by Assessors 22.663 80 

Supplementary Tax 1,134 00 



$73,119 80 



EXPENDITIRES. 

Paid Appleton Company abatement 

after payment 4,296 05 

Hamilton M'f'g Co. abatement 

after payment 17,089 50 

Tremont & Suffolk' Mills abate- 
ment after payment 12,666 47 

Appleton Company on execu- 
tion 1,389 90 

Hamilton M'f'g Co. on execu- 
tion 6,985 08 

Tremont & Suffolk Mills on ex- 
ecution 6,069 19 

48,496 19 
Paid sundry persons abatement after 

payment 104 50 

Abated by Assessors before pay- 
ment * 23,807 39 

72,408 08 

Balance undrawn Dec. 31, 1904. . . 711 72 

73,119 80 



auditor's report. 21 

ASSESSORS SALARIES. 

Appropriation 12,551 00 

$12,551 00 



Paid Principal Assessors : 

Abel Wheeler 

John P. Mahoney. ., 
C. Arthur Abbott 



Assistant Assessors : 

M. Bourdon 

R. Charlton 

T. F. Garvey . . . . 
E. T. Goward... 
W. J. McCluskey 
Charles Riley . . . . , 



Clerks : 

Stephen J. Kirby. . . 
William J, Reardon 
Charles C. Hartwell 
Harry Lawrence. . . . 
Andrew Liddell . . . 
Eugene Mayrand... 
Joseph Meehan .... 

George Owen 

Frank B. Peabody . . 
Hazen G. Pillsbury. 



Interpreters : 

J. H. Prempas, 
Y. Seroithes . 
W. Smith 



EXPENDITURES 




2,250 00 




2,250 00 




2,250 00 






$6,750 00 




156 00 




156 00 




156 00 




156 00 




156 00 




156 00 






936 00 


1,600 00 


1,200 00 




345 00 




5 00 




331 25 




132 50 




285 00 




345 00 




337 50 




187 50 






4,768 75 




1 50 




50 00 




27 88 






79 38 






$12,534 13 



22 auditor's report. 

ASSESSORS, SALARIES— Continued. 



Transferred to General Treasury 

Fund 16 87 



$12,551 00 



ASSESSORS SUNDRIES 
Appropriation $1,500 00 



EXPENDITURES. 



Blank Books, Stationery, Printing, 
etc. : 

To Courier Citizen Co 

Dumas & Co 

Thomas H. Lawler 

Lawler Printing Co 

Lowell Bill Posting Co 

Osmond Long 

G. C. Prince & Son - 

Sampson, Murdock & Co 

The Review & Record Co .... 
Wright & Potter Printing Co. . 

Sundries : 

A pp. School Houses Materials 

American Express Co 

John P. Mahoney 

N. E. T. & T. Co 

D. L. Page Co 



Transferred to General Treasury 
Fund 



$1,500 00 



11 75 




208 75 




6 05 




834 85 




4 00 




5 50 




24 75 




12 00 




5 00 




13 00 






1,125 65 




61 




1 00 




6 00 




32 




14 00 


21 93 




$1,147 58 




352 42 


$1,500 00 



auditor's report. 23 

AUDITOR, SALARIES. 
Appropriation TJ $3,527 00 



EXPENDITURES. 



David Chase, Auditor 1,800 00 

James T. Dunfey, Clerk 942 00 

Clinton P. Tuttle, Clerk 785 00 



AUDITOR, SUNDRIES. 
Appropriation $730 00 



EXPENDITURES. 

Blank Books, Stationery, Printing, 
etc. : 

To Buckland Printing Co 

Butterfield Printing Co 

Carter's Ink Co 

Courier-Citizen Co 

John Crawford 

Daily Mail Publishing Co.... 

Dumas & Co 

Thomas H. Lawler 

W. C. Olson Mfg. Co 

G. C. Prince & Son 

Sampson, Murdock & Co.... 

E. T. Tilton 

F. A. M. Tobin 

Amount carried forward 435 41 



12 


50 


19 


40 




76 


125 


50 


4 


50 


146 


40 


50 


00 


13 


85 


2 


50 


21 


10 


3 


00 


3 


00 


32 


90 



$3,527 00 



$3,527 00 



$730 00 



24 auditor's report. 

AUDITORS, SUNDRIES— Continued. 
Amount brought forward 435 41 

Sundries : 

To American Express Co 15 

N. E. T. & T. Co 28 

J. H. Sparks 5 00 5 43 

440 84 
Transferred to General Treasury 

Fund 289 16 

$730 00 

CITY CLERK, SALARIES. 

Appropriation $4,628 00 

$4,628 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

To Girard P. Dadman, City Clerk 1,800 00 

William P. McCarthy, Asst. 

City Clerk 1,500 00 

Belle C. Hill, Clerk 728 00 

Georgia T. Story, Clerk 600 00 

$4,628 00 

CITY CLERK, SUNDRIES. 

Appropriation $1,241 00 ^ 

$1,241 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

Books, Stationery, Printing, etc. : 

To Buckland Printing Co 9 25 

Butterfield Printing Co 18 00 

Amount carried forward. ... ... $ 27 25 



AUDITOR S REPORT. 



25 



CITY CLERK, SUNDRIES— Continued. 

Amount brought forward $ 27 25 

Carter's Ink Co 2 25 

Courier-Citizen Co 49 25 

G. P. Dadman 42 65 

Dumas & Co 16 00 

Thomas H. Lawler 16 70 

Lawler Printing Co 10 10 

Libby Printing Co 5 75 

Chas. Ltttlefield & Co 40 

Lowell Bill Posting Co 6 00 

Henry M. Meek Publishing Co. 34 00 

G. C. Prince & Son. 22 45 

Chas. E. Robinson 34 00 

Sampson, Murdock & Co 6 00 

Thorp & Martin Co 1 50 

F. A. M. Tobin 8 25 

Union Printing Co 71 75 

M. G. Wight & Co 5 50 

Telephone and Express : 

To American Express Co 2 65 

Manchester & Concord Express 

Co 2 90 

N. E. T. & T. Co 83 

Reporting Births — Enumerators : 

To F. R. Cross .... 12 40 

G. W. Capron 18 50 

M. H. Gilroy 20 90 

T. R. Kennedy 18 90 

C. R. Kidder 14 50 

J. H. Lavallee 50 00 

T. E. McCormick 18 50 

F. B. Peabody 15 10 

FredN. Tilton 25 55 

194 35 
To Sundry Persons, Physicians, 

Nurses 488 75 

Amounts carried forward 



367 55 



6 38 



683 10 



$1,057 03 



26 auditor's report. 

CITY CLERK, SUNDRIES— Continued. 

Amounts brought forward $ 1,057 03 

Sundries : 

To A. M. Harmon 6 00 6 00 

$1,063 03 

Transferred to General Treasury 

Fund 177 97 

$1,241 00 
* 

CITY TREASURER, SALARIES. 

Appropriation $7,340 00 

$7,340 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

To Andrew G. Stiles, City Treas. 2,700 00 

Joseph Farrell, Clerk 1,500 00 

Charles C. Wilson, Clerk 942 00 

James S. O'Sullivan, Clerk. . . 942 00 

Minnie Freeman, Clerk 628 00 

Kittie Miskella 628 00 

$7,340 00 

CITY TREASURER, SUNDRIES, 

Appropriation $3,460 00 ' 

Additional Appropriations 562 85 

$4,022 85 

EXPENDITURES. 

Books, Stationery, Printing, Adver- 
tising, etc. : 

To Boston News Bureau 14 00 

Buckland Printing: Co , 147 50 



'6 



Amount carried forward $ 161 bO 



AUDITOR S REPORT. 



27 



CITY TREAvSURER, SUNDRIES— Continued. 



Amount brought forward 

Courier-Citizen Co 

Daily Mail Publishing Co 

Dumas & Co 

Lepine & Co 

Lowell Post Office 

Lowell Sun 

Municipal Journal Publishing 

Co 

Pneumatic Hand Stamp Co. . . 

G. C. Prince & Son 

Sampson, Murdock & Co 

The Dodge Co 

The Review & Record Co. . . . 

Tilton & Co 

F. A. M. Tobin 

Writing and Distributing Tax Bills : 

To R. Charlton 

O. J. David 

E. Gerrish 

E. T. Goward 

T. J. Johnson 

F. Keefe 

J. Meehan 

R. L. Read 

J . Wright 

Serving Warrants : 

To Daniel Emery, 

Enoch Gerrish 

Charles C. Hartwell 

John McManus 

G. F. Stiles/. 

Amounts carried forward 



$ 161 50 



186 


00 




190 


00 




126 


50 




182 


00 




212 


00 




180 


00 




9 


00 




3 


15 




28 


55 




6 


00 




3 


75 




5 


00 
25 




57 


00 


1,398 45 






65 


00 




65 


00 




65 


00 




65 


00 




65 


00 




62 


50 




65 


00 




65 


00 




65 


00 


582 50 


499 


00 


782 


00 




15 


50 




533 


00 




96 


00 


1,925 50 








$ 3,906 45 



28 auditor's report. 

CITY TREASURER, SUNDRIES— Continued. 
Amounts brought forward $ 3,906 45 

Sundries : 

To H. C. Derby 30 00 

Middlesex Registry of Deeds . . 7 50 

N. E. T. & T. Co 3 90 

E. M. Tucke 75 00 

116 40 

$4,022 85 

CITY MESSENGER, SALARIES. 

Appropriation. $1,200 00 

$1,200 00 

r 

EXPENDITURES. 

/ 

To Joseph E. Pattee, City Mes- 
senger 1,200 00 

$1,200 00 

CITY MESSENGER, LIGHTING. 

Appropriation $1,547 86 

Additional Appropriation 2 30 

: $1,550 16 

■■■■■■iManaaH 
EXPENDITURES. 

To Lowell Gas Light Co., City 

Hall 326 43 

Lowell Electric Light Corp., 

City Hall 1,127 97 

Amount carried forward $ 1,454 40 



auditor's report. 29 

CITY MESSENGER, LIGHTING— Continued. 

Amount brought forward. ...... $ 1,454 40 

To Lowell Gas Light Co., Memo- 
rial Hall 25 38 

Lowell Electric Light Corp., 

Memorial Hall 70 38 

95 76 

$1,550 16 
CITY MESSENGER, SUNDRIES. 

Appropriation $400 00 

$400 00 



J,.miL..., 



EXPENDITURES. 

Books, Stationery, Printing, etc. : 

To Courier-Citizen Co 3 00 

J. H. B. Fogg 98 

Thomas H. Lawler . 10 85 

Libby Printing Co 27 50 

M. C. Olson Mfg. Co 2 57 

G. C. Prince & Son 138 42 

Sampson, Murdock & Co 21 00 

F. A. M. Tobin 9 75 

Tilton & Co 25 

Union Printing Co 4 50 

218 82 

Telephone, Transportation and Car- 
riage hire: 

To American Express Co 20 

B. & M. R. R 20 00 

Manchester & Concord Express 

Co .' 15 

N. E. T. & T. Co 19 45 

J. F. O'Donnell 4 00 

J. H. Sparks 45 50 

89 30 

Amounts carried forward $ 308 12 



30 auditor's report. 

CITY MESSENGER, SUNDRIES— Continued. 
Amounts carried forward $ 308 12 

Sundries : 

To C. B. Coburn Co 

Derby & Morse 

Frye & Crawford 

H. C. Girard ... 

R. A. Griffiths 

R. J. Lang & Co 

A. W. Lewis & Co 

O'Dounell Dry Goods Co. . . . 

A. G. Pollard & Co 

Charles P. Preston 

Smith & L»awrence 

Sterling Brush Co 

Tucke & Parker 

Thompson Hardware Co. . . . 



Transferred to General Treasury 
Fund 



CLERK OF COMMON COUNCIL. 

Appropriation $300 00 

$300 00 



9 


00 




9 


64 

85 




5 


35 




7 


00 




1 


20 




2 


00 




2 


90 




27 


00 




rr 




00 




15 


83 




3 


50 




2 


20 
30 


91 77 












399 89 






11 






$400 00 



EXPENDITURES. 



To Frank M. Dowling, Clerk of 

Common Council 300 00 

300 00 



CLERK OF COMMITTEES, SALARY. 

Appropriation $1,200 00 

$1,200 00 



auditor's report. 31 

CLERK OF COMMITTEES— Com inucd. 



EXPENDITURES. 



To Frank M. Dowling, Clerk of 

Committees $1,200 00 

$1,200 00 



CLERK OF COMMITTEES, SUNDRIES. 

Appropriation $200 00 

$200 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

Books, Stationery, Printing, ete. : 

To Courier-Citizen Co 3 25 

• Helen A. Dimon 19 GO 

Dumas & Co 3 00 

B. M. &jN. E. Hutchins 3 50 

Libby Printing Co 2G 25 

G. C. Prince & Son ... 13 95 

Chas. E. Robinson 10 25 

Thorpe & Martin Co 9 35 

Union Printing Co 8 50 

97 G5 

Transportation and Carriage hire : 

To B. & M. R. R 40 50 

Morse Coach Co 70 

J. H. Sparks 2 00 

43 20 

$140 85 
Transferred to General Treasury 

Fund 59 15 

$200 00 



32 auditor's report. 

CITY SEALER, SALARY. 

Appropriation. $350 00 , 

$350 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

To James R. Fulton, City Sealer.. $350 00 

$350 00 

CITY SEALER, SUNDRIES. 
Appropriation $70 00 

$70 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

To Baker Printing Co 2 50 

Courier-Citizen Co 4 00 

Daily Mail Publishing Co 2 00 

Lowell Sun 2 00 

J ames Leach 56 15 

G6 05 

Transferred to General Treasury 

Fund * 3 35 

$70 00 

POUND KEEPER. 

Appropriation $5 00 

$5 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

To O. W. Peabody, Pound Keeper 2 92 

Transferred to General Treasury 

Fund 2 08 

$5 00 



auditor's report. 33 



FISH WARDEN. 
Appropriation $40 00 



$40 00 



EXPENDITURES. 



To Charles W. Swan, Fish Warden 2 04 

George T. Spence. 37 9G 

40 00 



INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS AND PROVISIONS. 
Appropriation $500 



$500 00 



EXPENDITURES. 



To Walter A. Sherman 500 00 

500 00 

CITY WEIGHER AND iMEASURER, SALARY. 

Appropriation $800 00 

$800 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

To George F. Noonan, City Weigher 

and Measurer 800 00 

$ 800 00 



34 auditor's report. 

CITY WEIGHER AND MEASURER, SUNDRIES. 

Appropriation $ 25 00 

$25 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

To C. B. Coburn Co 50 

F. A. M. Tobin 18 00 

18 50 

Transferred to General Treasury 

Fund 6.50 

$ 25 00 



to UtiUCrSaLkM ■-*". WHOM —— I 



INSPECTOR MILK AND VINEGAR, SALARIES. 

Appropriation $2,215 50 

• $2,215 50 

EXPENDITURES. 

To Trios/ O. Allen Inspector 1,500 00 

Tames E. Hill Collector 706 50 

2,206 50 

Transferred to General Treasury 

Fund 9 00 

$ 2.215 50 

INSPECTOR OF MILK AND VINEGAR, SUNDRIES. 

Appropriation $200 00 

$200 00 



auditor's report. 35 



INSPECTOR OF MILK AND VINEGAR— Continued. 

EXPENDITURES. 

Printing, Stationery, etc. : 

To Courier-Citizen Co 

Daily Mail Publishing Co . . 

Dumas & Co 

B. M. & M. E. Hutchins. . . 

Lowell Sun 

G. C. Prince & Son 

Sampson, Murdock & Co.. 
Union Printing: Co 



John Wiley 



& 



Laboratory, Supplies ; 

To Carleton & Hovey. 

P. Dempsey & Co 

Eimer & Amend 

L. E. Knott Apparatus Co. . . . 

R. J. Lang& Co 

Talbot Dyewood & Chemical. 

Co 

H. E. Webster & Co 

Sundries : 

To George F. Allen 

Thos. O. Allen 

American Express Co 

John Cross 

General Electric Co 

Manchester & Concord Ex. Co 

A. G. Pollard & Co 

W. H. Ward& Co 



Transferred to General Treasury 
Fund 



3 92 




1 00 




10 75 




2 00 




4 25 




10 55 




3 00 




31 20 




6 35 






$ 73 02 


6 00 


2 75 




1 60 




5 00 




5 50 




3 26 




7 56 






31 67 


3 60 




12 41 




40 




7 00 




1 52 




40 




3 00 




5 35 


33 68 




138 37 




61 63 


$ 200 00 



INSPECTOR OF WIRES, SALARIES. 
Appropriation $2,128 00 

$2,128 00 



36 auditor's report. 

INSPECTOR OF WIRES, SALARIES— Continued. 



EXPENDITURES. 



To James F. McElholm Inspector 

of Wires 1,500 00 

Marietta L. McGrath, Clerk. . . 628 00 

2,128 00 



INSPECTOR OF WIRES, SUNDRIES. 

Appropriation $500 00 

Receipts 09 

Additional Appropriation 237 65 

$737 74 



EXPENDITURES. 

Stationery, Printing, etc; 

To Electrical Review 6 00 

J. M. Fellows 2 25 

Thomas H. Lawler 8 7() 

Libby Printing Co 12 00 

Municipal Journal & Register. 3 00 

G. C. Prince & Son 1 75 

Sampson, Murdock & Co 3 00 

36 70 

Transportation and Carriage hire : , 

To B. & M. R. R , 60 25 

J. F. O'Donnell & Sons 4 00 

64 25 

Repairing Carriages & Harnesses : 

Sawyer Carriage Co 19 82 

J. H. Sparks 59 70 

J. T. Williamson 1 00 

80 52 

Amount carried forward $ 181 47 



auditor's report. 37 

INSPECTOR OF WIRES, SUNDRIES— Continued. 

Amount brought forward $ 181 47 

Keeping and Shoeing Horse : 

To Owen J. Carney 24 75 

J. H. Sparks 222 97 

247 72 

Sundries : 

To App. School Houses, Labor. . 183 42 

J. F. McElholm 61 25 

Marion 50 00 

Tucke & Parker 8 88 

Waverly Hotel 5 00 

308 55 

$ 737 74 

MAYOR, SALARIES. 

Appropriation $4,200 00 

$4,200 00 

I !■ WHIII ■— — 

EXPENDITURES. 

To Charles E. Howe, Mayor 3,000 00 

Edwards Cheney, Secretary. . . 1,200 00 

$4,200 00 

MAYOR, SUNDRIES. 

Appropriation $ 400 00 

$ 400 00 



38 auditor's report. 

MAYOR, SUNDRIES— Continued. 

EXPENDITURES. 

Blank Books, Stationery, Printing, 
etc. : 

To Baker Printing Co 

Courier-Citizen Co 

J. M. Fellows 

Osmond Long . 

Lowell Daily Mail 

Lowell Sun 

Municipal Engineering Co. . 
Municipal Journal Publishing 

Co 

G. C. Prince & Son 

Sampson, Murdock & Co 

Smith Premier Typewriter Co. 
Union Printing Co 

Telephone, Transportation, Car- 
riage hire, etc : 

To American Express Co 

B. & M. R. R 

G. W. Chapman 

Morse Coach Co ... 

N. E. T. & T. Co 

J. H. Sparks 

Western Union Tel. Co 

41 72 

Sundries : 

To Clarance H. Raymond 35 00 

35 00 

$186 22 
Transferred to General Treasury 

Fund 213 78 

400 00 



31 


05 


6 


00 




75 


7 


50 


3 00 


G 


00 


2 


00 


3 


00 


20 


35 


3 


00 


22 


35 


4 


50 




25 


20 


25 


6 


00 


3 


00 




84 


10 


40 




98 



109 50 



auditor's report. 39 



MAYOR, STENOGRAPHY AND EXTRA 
CLERK HIRE. 

Appropriation $200 00 

$200 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

To Francis E. Andrews 4 00 

B. M. & M. E. Hutchins 3 25 

7 25 

Transferred to General Treasury 

Fund 192 75 

$200 00 



REGISTRARS OF VOTERS, SALARIES. 

Appropriation 1 $3,000 00 

Additional Appropriation 450 00 

$3,450 00 

EXPENDITURES 

Board of Registrars : 

To Girard P. Dadman 550 00 

John P. Farley 550 00 

Albert J. Blazon 550 00 

Cornelius F. Sullivan 550 00 

2,200 00 

Clerks: 

To Frank Cross 12 50 

Harry P. Farley 365 00 

M. J. Fletcher 55*00 

J. C. King 87|50 

Waldo F. Miles 20 00 

F..B. Peabody 45 00 

H. G. Pillsbury 5 00 

Arthur Salmon 12 50 

Amounts carried forward G02 50 $2,200 00 



40 auditor's report. 

REGISTRARS OF VOTERS, SALARIES— Continued. 

Amounts brought forward $"602 50 $ 2,200 00 

J. Sullivan 80 00 

Fred N. Tilton 378 75 

1,061 25 

$3,261 25 
Transferred to General Treasury 

Fund 188 75 

$3,450 00 

REGISTRARS OF VOTERS, SUNDRIES. 

Appropriation $,1000 00 

Additional Appropriation 350 00 

1,350 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

Printing, Posting, etc. : 

To Butterfield Printing Co 12 50 

Courrier-Citizen Co 455 75 

Dumas & Co 44 50 

Lowell Bill Posting Co 51 00 

Lawler Printing Co 5 00 

Osmond Long 30 60 

Union Printing Co 58 18 

657 53 

Books, Stationery, etc. : 

G. C. Prince & Son 1 55 

Charles S. Proctor 64 77 

Sampson, Murdock & Co 6 00 

Tilton & Co 1 50 

73 82 

Sundries : 

To Charles F. Bradley 10 44 

Helen A. Dimon 19 00 

Amounts carried forward 29 44 $ 731 35 



auditor's report. 41 

REGISTRARS OF VOTERS, SUNDRIES— Continued. 

Amounts brought forward 29 44 $ 731 35 

D. L. Page Co 24 47 

J. H. Sparks , .. 3 00 

Waverly Hotel . 36 00 

92 91 

824 26 

Transferred to General Treasury 

Fund 525 74 

$1,350 00 

CARE OF CITY HALL, LABOR. 

Appropriation $5,325 00 

$5,325 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

To Sundry Persons for Labor 5,325 00 

5,325 00 

CARE OF CITY HALL, POLICE OFFICER 

Appropriation $1,006 50 

$1,006 50 

MMIHiMMMUnMnKKmt 

EXPENDITURES. 

Appropriation for Police, Salaries 

and Labor, Services of Officers 1,006 50 

1,006 50 



42 auditor's report. 

CARE OF CITY HALL, SUNDRIES. 
Appropriation $900 00 



EXPENDITURES. 

Repairs on Furniture, Fixtures, etc. : 

To Adams & Co 21 25 

H. R. Barker Mfg. Co 2 15 

Derby & Morse 61 75 

George H. Gage 39 00 

Alvin Lawrence. 51 00 

A. W. Lewis & Co 6 12 

Welch Bros 62 85 



Hardware, etc. : 

To H. C. Girard 10 30 

W. A. Mack& Co 9 00 

Smith & Lawrence 1 25 

Thompson Hardware Co 8 20 



Decorations : 

To R. A. Griffiths 15 00 

Whittet & Co 18 00 



Furniture, Carpets, etc. : 

To J. H. Burns 28 25 

Gookin Bros 20 50 

J. S.Hastings 17 09 

H. E. Webster & Co 29 25 



Cleaning Supplies : 

To F. M. Bill & Co 1 80 

C. B. Coburn Co 15 00 

John P. Curley 3 00 

W. P. Fove 5 00 

India Alkali Works 27 54 

Kelty "Bros 3 80 



$900 00 



244 12 



28 75 



33 00 



95 09 



Amounts carried forward 56 14 $ 400 96 



auditor's report. 43 

CARE OF CITY 'HALL, SUNDRIES— Continued. 

Amounts brought forward 5C 14 $ 400 96 

A. L. Kittredge & Co 

W. W. Morrison 

John McCullough 

O'Brien Bros 

G. C. Prince & Son 

Simpson & Rowland 

Talbot Dye wood & Chemical 
Co 



Sundries : 



App. for Water Works 

t< i< Parks, Sundries... 

Bon Marche 

Conway Transfer Co 

John Cross 

Daniel Gage 

Greenwood Bros 

George E. Hutchins 

W. A. Ingham Co 

C. F. Morse 

O'Brien Bros 

O'Donnell & Gilbride Co. . . 



14 


85 


7 


50 


9 


00 


8 


75 


7 


50 


5 


90 




48 


184 


56 


12 


49 


7 


50 




25 


1 


00 


118 


38 


6 


00 


17 


55 


4 


50 


6 


82 


1 


20 


28 


67 



CITY CEMETERIES. 
Appropriation $9,000 00 



EXPENDITURES. 



To Charles A. Wotton, Supt 1,199 96 

Sundry Persons for Labor. . . . 5,377 31 



110 12 



388 92 



$900 00 



$9,000 00 



Amount carried forward 6,577 27 



44 auditor's report. 

CITY CEMETERIES, SUNDRIES— Continued. 
Amount brought forward $ 6,577 27 

Water, Lighting, Telephone : 

App. for Water Works 147 58 

Lowell Gas Light Co 63 

N. E. Tel. & Tel. Co 2 38 

150 59 

Hardware, Tools, etc. : 

To Adams Hardware & Paint Co. 10 65 

F. W. Cheney & Co 90 

E. P. Flanders & Co 58 79 

Thompson Hardware Co 29 32 

99 66 

Pipe Fittings, etc. : 

To H. R. Barker Mfg. Co 49 12 

Boutwell Bros 3 03 

City Iron Foundry 30 00 

Harry S. Drury 56 25 

Charles E. Gee ,. 8 80 

Charles Hanchett & Co 1 50 

Charles F. Kappler 19 85 

George O'Malley 2 71 

I. C. Perkins.... 3 00 

Union Iron Foundry 90 00 

Welch Bros 30 52 

294 78 

Painters' Supplies : 

To Adams Hardware & Paint Co. . 145 14 

145 14 

Plants, Shrubs, etc. : 

To Charles R. Fish & Co 235 00 

Marshall . 102 60 

James Walsh 70 00 

Whittett & Co 6 50 

414 10 

Shoeing Horse : 

To A. D. Mitten 28 28 

28 00 

Hay, Grain, etc. : 

To H. E. Noyes & Son 65 78 

O. D. Wilder 28 50 

94 28 

Amount carried forward $ 7,803 82 



auditor's report. 45 

CITY CEMETERIES, SUNDRIES— Continued. 
Amount brought forward . . $ 7,803 82 

Fuel, etc : 

To Lowell Coal Co 19 65 

YY holey Coal Co 14 00 



Manure, Loam etc. : 

To Thomas Egan .... 

E. P. Flanders & Co 

John F. Mahoney 

D. J . M urphy 

M, Murphy 

Joseph Tremblay 

Whitman & Pratt Rendering Co 
Cora J. Wilson 



Carriages, Harnesses etc. : 

To A. L. Butman 22 25 

F. B. Hill & Co 46 90 

C. F. Kappler 2 25 



133 


92 


35 


00 


14 00 


108 


00 


85 


00 


7 


50 


38 


00 


14 


40 



Stationery, Printing etc. : 

To Daily Mail Publishing Co 

Thomas H. Lawler. 

G. C. Prince & Son 

Sampson, Murdock & Co 

Smith Premier Typewriter Co 
Union Printing Co 



'o 



Sundries : 

To Warren A. Bishop .... 

Gustaf Carlson 

B. L. Dutton 

Gumb Bros 

John S. Haynes .... 
Lowell Wall Paper Co 
P. T. McMahon 

Amounts carried forward. . . 



33 65 



435 82 



71 40 





2 50 








60 








37 40 








3 00 








87 75 








41 75 




173 00 




1 90 






2 20 








9 05 








102 00 








30 00 








5 25 








28 00 








178 40 


$8 


,517 69 



46 auditor's report. 

CITY CEMETERIES, SUNDRIES— Continued, 

Amounts brought forward $ 178 40 $ 8,517 69 

A. F. Storey & Co 54 

Charles A. Wotton 275 00 

453 94 

8,971 63 
Transferred to General Treasury 

Fund 28 37 

$ 9,000 00 

ELECTIONS. 

Appropriation $6,500 00 

Additional Appropriation 7,000 00 

$13,500 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

To Sundry Persons, Services as 

Election Officers 7,552 00 

Sundry Persons for Labor .... 972 04 

App. Public Buildings Labor, 66 02 

8,590 06 

Clerks : 

To F. R. Cross 207 50 

H. K. Gates 7 50 

H. Hoole 2 50 

J. P. Farley 15 00 

F. B. Peabody 112 50 

Arthur Salmon 95 00 

440 00 

Repairing Ballot Boxes : 

To C. F. Hatch Co 94 50 

Charles L. Littlefield & Co . . 23 70 

118 20 

Amount carried forward $ 9,148 26 



AUDITOR S REPORT. 



47 



ELECTIONS— Continued. 



Amount brought forward 



$9,148 26 



Hardware, etc. : 

To Adams Hardware & Paint Co. 
Carroll Bros 

E. J. Carroll & Co 

F. W. Cheney & Co 

E. P. Flanders & Co 

H. C. Girard 

Thompson Hardware Co 

Stationery and Typewriting : 

To G. P. Dadman 

Helen A. Dimon 

Dumas & Co 

B. M. & M. E. Hutchins 

H. C. Kittredge 

T. H. Lawler 

G. C. Prince & Son 

C. S. Proctor 

Printing, Posting, etc. : 

To Baker Printing Co 

Buckland Printing Co 

Butterfield Printing Co 

Courier-Citizen 

Daily Mail Corp 

Lawler Printing Co. 

Labor Journal 

Lepine & Co 

Libby Printing Co 

Charles Littlefield & Co 

Lowell Bill Posting Co 

Lowell Sun . ... 

Lowell Labor Journal 

Charles E. Robinson 

Saturday Free Press 

Sunday Telegram 

F. A. M. Tobin 

Union Printing Co 

Amount carried forward 



11 


25 




22 


30 




22 


32 




1 


25 




56 


25 




2 


40 




2 


13 


117 90 


40 00 


60 


70 




29 


00 




49 


61 
45 




42 


35 




45 


65 




124 


32 


392 08 


41 


00 


6 


75 




1.506 


15 




171 


60 




42 


00 




3 


10 




12 


00 




12 


60 




55 


05 




32 


00 




5 


00 




33 


00 




12 


00 




58 


50 




24 


00 




22 


95 




19 


25 




478 


00 


2,534 95 








$12,193 19 



48 auditor's report. 

ELECTIONS— Continued 
Amount brought forward 

Fuel: 

To John Brady 

W. T. Griffin 

Frank Rellly 



Teaming, Carriage hire, etc. 

To Thomas Casey 

Conway Transfer Co. . 
C. H. Hanson & Co. . . 

Ed. Judge 

T. G. Little 

S. T. Moses 

Morse Coach Co 

S. W. Parker 

O. F. Prentiss 

M. Reynolds 

R. E. Richardson 

J. II. Sparks 

John Sullivan 

Care of Ward Rooms : 

To O. W. Brown 

John J. Carr 

John H. Hallett 

P. F. Hannafm 

Dennis Harrington 

Timothy Harrington. . . 

Wm. Kennedy 

P. J. Mahoney 

H. L. Morgan 

John McCarty 

Omer Smith 

Wm. H Stafford 

Chas. Thurston 

Luke Veo 



Amount carried forward 







$12, 


,193 19 


32 00 






22 


00 






3 


25 




57 25 


9 


00 






156 


50 






57 


25 

50 






58 


00 






12 


00 






5 


00 






16 


00 






28 


00 






20 00 






10 


50 






17 


50 






20 00 












410 25 


12 


75 




3 


00 






2 


00 






3 00 






4 


00 






4 


00 






2 


75 






12 


00 






2 


00 






2 


51 






13 


33 






2 


00 






1 


00 






1 


00 




65 34 








* 


$ 12,726 03 



auditor's report. 49 

ELECTIONS— Continued. 
Amount brought forward $12,726 03 

Rent : 

To H. F. Felton, Agent 15 00 

C. F. Keyes 20 00 

Julia McCarty 75 00 

Mechanics Savings Banks 75 00 

Percy Parker 100 00 

285 00 

Sundries : 

To J. W. Bennett Co 

S. J. Bigelow 

C. F. Bradley 

C. B. Coburn Co 

Alfred C. Cook 

D. J. Giroux , 

Michael Mullin 

A. McCloughry 

O'Donnell & Gilbride Co 

D. L. Page Co 

Chas. R. Preston 

W. H. Spaulding & Co 

Spencer & Co 

Waver ly Hotel 

291 22 
Transferred to General Treasury 

Fund 197 75 





50 


49 


51 


9 


28 


46 


32 


20 


63 


12 


38 


8 


00 


30 25 


30 00 


33 


25 


30 


00 


2 


50 


14 


60 


4 


00 



STATE SUPERVISORS. 

Balance undrrawn Jan. 1, 1904 ... 136 00 

Additional Appropriation 864 00 



EXPENDITURES. 



To Sundry Persons for Services. . . 824 00 

Balance undrawn Dec. 31, 1904. . . 176 00 



$13,500 00 



$1,000 00 



$1,000 00 



50 



AUDITOR S REPORT. 



ENGINEERING. 



Appropriation $7,500 00 

Receipts from Sundry Departments, 7,755 12 



$15,255 12 



EXPENDITURES. 



To George Bowers, City Engineers 
Sundry Persons, Assistants. . . . 


2,700 
11,877 


00 
60 


14,577 60 


Carriages, Harnesses and Repairs: 






F. 13. Hill & Co 


50 00 
37 80 

44 20 




Sawyer Carriage Co 


132 00 


Books, Stationery, Printing, etc* : 
To Buckland Printing Co 

J. D. Bartley 

W. B. Clark Co 


3 50 
75 

2 25 

3 00 

2 00 

3 00 
50 

2 00 

3 00 
55 00 
11 68 
13 20 

3 50 

10 00 

65 


Engineering News. Pub. Co. . . 
Thos. *H . Lawler 




Municipal Engineering Co. . . . 
Municipal Journal Pub. Co. . . 

Frederick Post Co 




F. A. M. Tobin 




Geo. II. Walker & Co 

Tilton & Co 






114 03 
66 64 


Telephone, Transportation, etc. : 
To American Express Co 

B. & M. R. R 

N. E T. & T. Co 

N. Y. & B. Des. Ex. Co 

N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R ... 

J. H. Sparks 


7 
20 
25 

13 


07 
25 
07 
90 
35 
00 












$14,890 27 



auditor's report. 51 

ENGINEERING— Continued. 
Amount brought forward $14,890 27 

Sundries : 

To Adams Hardware & Paint Co. 1 00 

George Bowers 29 25 

Concord Drug Store 1 20 

W. W. Carey 6 80 

Derby & Morse 4 80 

Helen A. Dimon 2 00 

Eugene Dritzgen Co 12 18 

Frye & Crawford 10 

H. C. Girard 80 

A. L. Kittredge & Co 11 55 

F. M. Lazelle 12 00 

Chas. E. Moss 2 40 

J. S. Mason & Co 30 10 

Riehle Bros. Testing Machine 

Co 15 30 

Rice & Co 1 00 

E. G. Soltman 2 70 

W. H. Spaulding & Co G 75 

Thompson Hardware Co 3 25 

143 18 

15,033 45 

Transferred to General Treasury 

Fund 221 G7 

$15,255 12 

FIRE DEPARTMENT, SALARIES AND LABOR. 

Appropriation $106,956 50 

Additional Appropriation 3,000 00 

$109,956 50 



mmi ■■■■ i 



52 



AUDITOR S REPORT. 



FIRE DEP'T. SALARIES AND LABOR— Continued. 

EXPENDITURES 

To Edward S. Hosmer, Chief 

Engineer 2,000 00 

James F. Norton, Asst. Eng'r. 1,500 00 

H. W. Burton " "... 366 68 

Edward Meloy " ". . . 40001 

Geo. F. Salmon " ". . . 400 01 

4,666 70 

Call Fireman 21,374 68 

Permanent Firemen 83,812 85 

109,854 23 

Transferred to General Treasury 

Fund 102 27 

$109,956 50 

FIRE DEPARTMENT, SUNDRIES. 

Appropriation $24,835 00 

Receipts from App. Fire Dept. un- 
derground wires 185 33 

$25,020 33 

EXPENDITURES. 

Fuel : 

To John Brady 12 00 

John T. Brennan 3 00 

Edward Cawley 688 35 

Lowell Coal Co 1,945 48 

George Lynch 10 00 

Frank Reilly 12 00 

D. T. Sullivan 237 38 

2,908 21 

Hay, Grain, etc. : 

To Ame & Co 25 00 

A. M. Blackie 192 56 

$ 217 56 
Amount carried forward $ 2,908 21 



auditor's report. 53 

FIRE DEPARTMENT, SUNDRIES— Continued. 

Amount brought forward $217 56 $ 2,908 21 

J. B. Cover & Co 340 99 

C. H. Cutter 35 16 

Charles Dumas & Co 76 35 

George M. Foster 1,280 59 

W. P. Foye & Co 6 40 

Fred E. Jones 372 70 

Lowell Coal Co 282 06 

Joseph Marin 245 67 

T. J. McDonald 328 40 

Joseph Mullin 771 90 

H. E. Noyes & Son 1,555 38 

D. A. Reardon 49 44 

Fred H. Rourke 176 37 

Paul Vigeant & Co 1,173 98 

O. D. Wilder 114 76 

7,027 71 

Horses and Use of Horses : 

To C. H. Hanson & Co 2,320 57 

D. D. Libby 64 00 

2,384 57 

Water, Lighting and Telephone : 

App. Water Works . . 420 05 

Lowell Electric Light Corp. . . 338 46 

Lowell Gas Light Co 1,525 00 

N. E. T. & T. Co 254 81 

2,538 32 

Shoeing Horses: 

To R. R. Armitstead 30 06 

E. P. Bryant 30 40 

L. D. Butters 32 50 

James Blakely 113 75 

M. J. Cahill 107 00 

Cahill Bros 54 60 

Owen J. Carney 90 00 

John H. Collins 9 50 

C. Desmond 313 20 

J. J. Donnelly 133 80 

Q. A. Foster 35 48 

$ 950 29 
Amount carried forward $ 14,858 81 



54 auditor's report. _ 

FIRE DEPARTMENT, SUNDRIES— Continued. 
Amount brought forward $950 29 $14,858 81 

M. V. B. Libbey & Co 113 40 

A. D. Mitten 161 96 

George R. Morse 18 35 

A. Parsons 145 58 

Henry Reynolds 40 75 

S. A. Shattuck 37 25 

C. H. 'Ward 49 25 

J. T. Williamson 102 05 

1,618 88 



Carriages, Harnesses and Repairs : 

To Robert Barris 99 50 

A. L. Butman 76 20 

E. P. Bryant 109 43 

A. H. Cluer 29 95 

Donovan Harness Co 210 45 

G. K. Hammond 9 50 

C. H. Hanson & Co 62 50 

F. B. Hill & Co 639 60 

J. H. Laporte 161 40 

H. J. O'Dowd 12 00 

D. W. Parker , 7 55 

C. N. Perkins & Co 21 75 

Sawyer Carriage Co 843 32 

D. C. Stanley 16 20 

J. H. Swett 119 53 

Geo. H. Taylor 6 75 

H. W. Tinker 1 15 



Lumber : 

To Burham & Davis Lumber Co. . 5 26 

Pratt & Forrest 10 08 



Hardware, etc. : 

To W. T. S. Bartlett 13 21 

Boutwell Bros 29 30 

Owen E. Brennan 2 01 

F. W. Cheney & Co 7 25 

E. P. Flanders & Co 5 25 



2,426 78 



15 34 



$ 57 02 



Amount carried forward $ 18,919 81 



auditor's report. 



55 



FIRE DEPARTMENT, SUNDRIES— Continued. 



Amounts brought forward 



$57 02 $18,919 81 



H. C. Girard 




50 




S. F. Hayward & Co 

N. D. Larleur 


18 
• 


35 
90 




W. A. Mack& Co 


105 


03 




Smith & Lawrence 


3 

67 


48 
83 




Thompson Hardware Co 










253 11 


Pipe Fittings, Hose and Repairs : 






To Adams Hardware & Paint Co. 


48 


50 




American Locomotive Co 


29 


50 




E. Badger & Sons Co 


3 


00 




James M. Baker 


12 


00 




H. R. Barker Mfg. Co 


256 


17 




Cornelius Callahan 


1,727 


80 




Carroll Bros 


7 

8 

11 
4 


10 
50 
70 
75 
00 




Wm. H. Hope & Co 




Geo. E. Hutchins 




D. Lovejoy & Son 




Middlesex Machine Co 




A. F. Nichols 


4 


95 




ScovilMfg. Co 

Rochester Machine Screw Co. 


18 
71 


00 

84 






18 


28 




D. H. Wilson & Co 


12 


40 




Welch Bros 


23 


10 






2,257 59 








Painters^and Electricians Supplies : 








To Adams Hardware & Paint Co. 


2 


75 




Boston Electric Co 


6 

2 

268 

39 


70 
00 
59 
00 




F. W. Cheney & Co 




C. B. Coburn Co 








Derby & Morse 


78 
48 
15 


42 
00 
00 




Heanev Mfpf. Co 




J O 

Willard W. Morrison. ...... 




Smith & Lawrence 


12 
13 


81 
92 




Tucke & Parker 






487 19 










$ 21,917 70 



56 



AUDITOR S REPORT. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT, SUNDRIES— Continued. 



Amount brought forward 



$ 21,917 70 



Stable Supplies : 

To Auburn Brush & Mop Co 

Adams Hardware & Paint Co. 

F. M. Bill & Co 

Cornelius Callahan Co 

Charles E. Carter 

Walter Loburn & Co 

Continental Brush Co 

P. Dempsey & Co 

Thomas Garvey 

C. I. Hood & Co 

W. A. Ingham Co 

Lowell Rendering Co 

Lowell Rubber Co .... 

National Sponge & Chamois 

Co... 

Simpson & Rowland 

Talbot Dye. & Chemical Co. . . 
Whitman & Pratt Rendering 

Co 

Furniture, Bedding, etc. : 

To Bon Marche 

P. J. Custy &Co 

Gilbride's. 

Gookin Bros 

Greenwood Bros .... 

E. Hapgood & Son 

James T. Henry & Co 

J. S. Hastings 

Lowell Wall Paper Co 

H. C. McOsker 

R. T. Mower 

O'Donnell & Gilbride Co 

O'Donnell Dry Goods Co 

A. E. O'Heir & Co 

A. G. Pollard & Co 

Robertson & Co 

Amount carried forward 



15 00 
4 50 



17 


30 


36 


00 


5 


50 


53 


00 


105 


00 


2 


75 


18 


00 


7 


00 


5 


75 


43 


20 


5 


33 


136 


04 


33 80 


- 48 


06 


13 


20 


65 


40 


2 


75 



549 43 



500 

36 00 

3 00 



62 72 




8 50 




3 75 




4 00 




49 99 




5 00 




60 50 




23 50 




27 00 




36 60 




20 25 






413 06 








$ 22,881 09 



AUDITOR S REPORT. 



57 



FIRE DEPARTMENT, SUNDRIES— Continued. 



Amount brought forward 

Laundering : 

To Scripture's Laundry 

Stationery, Printing, etc. : 

To J, Harry Boardman 

Buckland Printing Co 

Courier-Citizen Co 

Lawler Printing Co 

G. C. Prince & Son 

Sampson, Murdock & Co. . . . 

Tilton & Co 

F. A. M. Tobin 

Union Printing Co 

Veterinary : 

To A. W. Baker 

J. G. Lesure 

C. E. Munn 

W. A. Sherman 

J. H . Sparks 

Jesse A. Viles 

Transportation, Carriage hire, etc. 
To American Express Co 

B. & M. R. R 

Man. & Concord Express Co. 
N. Y. & B. Des. Express Co. 
N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R... 
J. H. Sparks 

Sundries : 

To F. M. Bill & Co 

Bon Marche 

Boston Belting Co 

C. G. Braxmar Co 

Carleton & Hovey 

C. H. Cutter 

Amounts carried forward 



119 12 



18 00 
5 00 

61 50 
98 00 

19 40 

3 00 
67 

35 00 

4 00 



70 00 
35 00 

2 00 

17 50 

127 00 

2 00 



8 90 
20 50 
1 70 
6 70 
1 75 
5 00 



158 50 
15 60 
12 19 
12 00 
2 00 
54 26 



$ 254 55 



$22,881 09 



119 12 



244 57 



253 50 



44 55 



$ 23,542 83 



58 auditor's report. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT, SUNDRIES— Continued. 

Amounts brought forward $254 55 $23,542 83 

Peter Davey 9 00 

J. Albert Evans 9 25 

John Ferris 1 20 

Josiah Gates & Sons 2 08 

iVlrs. W. H. Gibson 15 00 

H. L. Gonzales 1 00 

C. H. Hanson & Co 75 

S. B. Harmon 3 00 

E. S. Hosmer 85 50 

J. W. Jantzen 1 30 

F. W. Jenness 88 00 

A. L. Kittredge & Co 

A. Ivan Laughton 

Alvin Lawrence 

Middlesex Co 

T. J. McDonald 

McKissock Steam Carpet Clean- 
ing Works 

James Murkland & Son 

New Depaiture Bell Co 

A. F. Nichols 

O'Brien Bros 

C. N. Perkins & Co 

Pratt & Forrest 

F. E. Putnam 

Harry Raynes 

A. II. Sanborn & Co 

J. H. Sparks 

Waverly Hotel 

907 02 



2 


70 


5 


50 


7 


00 


191 


53 


8 


50 


13 


74 


19 


50 


20 


00 


2 


19 


7 


30 


39 


45 




35 


60 


50 




50 


20 


00 


28 


43 


9 


00 



24,449 85 
Transferred to General Treasury 

Fund 570 48 

$25,020 33 



auditor's report. 59 

UNDERGROUND WIRES, FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Appropriation $2,000 00 

$2,000 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

App. Fire Department Sundries. . . 185 33 

H. R. Barker Mfg. Co 44 99 

W. E. Declow 412 50 

E. P. Flanders & Co 5 00 

Farrell & Conaton 11 52 

N. E. T. & T. Co. G42 68 

N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R .... 9 65 

1,311 67 

Balance undrawn Dec. 31, 1904... 688 33 

$2,000 00 

HEALTH OFFICE, SALARIES AND LABOR. 

Appropriation $9,161 25 

$9,161 25 

EXPENDITURES. 

Board of Health: 

To Guy Holbrook 143 06 

William B. Jackson 500 00 

John H. McGuinness 125 00 

William C. Doherty 375 00 

Leonard Huntress 356 94 

1,500 00 

Agent : 

To Horace H. Knapp 1,830 00 

1,830 00 

Amounts carried forward $3,300 00 



60 auditor's report. 

HEALTH OFFICE, SALARIES AND LABOR— Continued. 

Amounts brought forward $ 3,330 00 

Clerk: ■ 

To Kathcrine M. Snow 628 00 

628 00 

Bacteriologist : 

To Thomas B. Smith 600 00 

600 00 

Inspectors : 

To F.A.Bates ,.. 1,28100 

W. H. Connors 1,020 50 

J. M. Farrell 156 00 

Stephen Garrity 1,099 00 

F. J. O'Hare 1,020 50 

4,577 00 



9,135 00 
Transferred to General Treasury 

Fund 26 25 

$9,161 25 

HEALTH OFFICE, SUNDRIES. 

Appropriation $2,200 00 

Additional Appropriation 245 56 

Receipts, App. Health Small Pox. . 42 85 

City of Worcester 18 57 

Town of Chelmsford 114 28 

$2,621 26 

EXPENDITURES. 

Professional Services : 

To W. A. Johnson 417 00 

E. J. Livingston 68 00 

Louis A. Olney 2()0 CO 

T. B. Smith 202 50 

887 50 

Amount carried forward $ 887 50 



AUDITORS REPORT. 



61 



HEALTH OFFICE, SUNDRIES -Continued. 



Amount brought forward 



$ 887 50 



Hospitals : 

To Lowell Hospital Association. . . 

Stationery, Printing and Adver- 
tising : 

To Buckland Printing Co 

Carter's Ink Co 

Courier-Citizen Co 

Daily Mail Publishing Co 

Dumas & Co 

C. F. Hatch & Co 

Journal of Medical Research. 

Lowell Sun 

Libby Printing Co 

Lawler Printing Co 

Thomas H. Lawler 

Library Bureau ... 

Lyon Platinum Pen Co. 

Municipal Engineering Co. . . . 
Municipal Journal and Engineer 
Municipal Journal Publishing 

Co 

W. C. Olson Mfg. Co 

G. C. Prince & Son 

Sampson, Murdock & Co 

Tilton & Co 

F. A. M. Tobin 

Wm. Woods Co 

Laboratory Supplies : 

To Adams Hardware & Paint Co. 

Otis Allen & Son 

H M . Alexander & Co 

Amyl Kijo Chemical Co 

Bausch & Lomb Optical Co. . . 

Charles E. Carter 

C. B. Coburn Co 

P. Dempsey & Co 

Eimer & Amend 

Amounts carried forward 



490 49 



8 


50 


1 


14 


66 


08 


1 


00 


2 


75 


5 


00 


4 


00 


3 


75 


246 


74 


22 


20 


13 


48 


4 


50 


6 


00 


2 


00 


3 


00 


5 


15 


2 


57 


15 


64 


6 


00 




30 


14 


00 


2 


25 



13 21 
5 00 



72 


50 


8 


80 


17 


50 


4 


45 


2 


50 


27 


50 


8 


77 



490 49 



436 05 



$160 23 $1,814 04 



62 



AUDITOR S REPORT. 



HEALTH OFFICE, SUNDRIES— Continued. 

Amounts brought forward $160 23 $1,814 04 

Ellingwood & Co 

John R. Fallon 

Keefe Bros. 

R. J. Lang & Co. . . . .... 

Frank E. McNabb 

Talbot Dye & Chemical Co 

H. E. Webster Co 

227 31 



Transportation, Carriage hire, etc* 

To American Express Co 

B. & M. R. R 

Man. & Con. Express Co .... 
N. Y. & B. Des. Express Co 
J. H. Sparks 

Telephone : 

To N. E. T. & T. Co 13 95 





49 


4 


50 


2 


40 


2 


45 


16 


85 


33 


55 


6 


84 


9 


95 


20 


00 




20 


1 


20 


2 


00 



33 35 



13 95 



Sundries : 

App. Lowell City Hospital Pro- 
visions 

App. School Houses Labor 

Otis Allen & Son 

F. A. Bates 

J . S. Brooks 

John Brady 

City of Worcester 

C. B. Coburn Co 

Conners Bros 

John Callaghan 

Stephen Garrity 

John F. Henley 

J. D. I lenry ... 

Harry C. Kittredge 

H. H. Knapp. . 

Lowell C oal Co 

Mass. Association Board of 
Health 

Joseph Mullin 

Amounts carried forward $299 36 $2,088 65 



14 


60 


11 


51 


5 


00 


10 


80 


2 


24 


2 


00 


37 


14 




10 


75 


00 


1 


60 


3 


44 


8 


00 


1 


25 


1 


25 


68 


25 


35 


18 


8 


00 


14 


00 



auditor's report. 63 

HEALTH OFFICE, SUUDRIES— Continued. 

Amounts brought forward $299 36 $2,088 65 

W. A. Mack & Co 14 25 

O'Sullivan Bros. Co 2 50 

Manuel Perry 3 00 

John Ryan . . 175 00 

Rose Scott 12 50 

Spencer & Co 20 00 

W. A. Sherman 3 00 

T. A. D. Sullivan & Co 3 00 

532 61 

$2,621 26 

HEALTH YARD, LABOR. 

Appropriation ' $28,355 00 

Additional Appropriation 118 51 

Receipts App. Health Small Pox.. 163 75 

$28,637 26 

EXPENDITURES. 



To Sundry Persons for Labor 28,637 26 

$28,63 7 26 

HEALTH YARD, SUNDRIES. 

Appropriation $5,000 00 

Additional Appropriation 48 43 

$5,048 43 



64 auditor's report 

HEALTH YARD, SUNDRIES— Continued. 



EXPENDITURES. 



Water : 

App. Water Works 96 75 



Lighting : 

To Lowell Eleetric Light Corp. . . 27 10 

Lowell Gas Light Co 67 56 



Fuel : 

To John Brady 20 00 

John T. Brennan 12 00 

Edward Cawley 68 95 

Daniel Gage 6 48 

Lowell Coal Co. 50 04 

Joseph Mullin 23 63 

Daniel T. Sullivan 72 14 



Hay Grain etc. : 

To Coffey Bros 200 00 

J. B. Cover & Co 281 82 

Chas. Dumas & Co 8 10 

Geo. M. Foster 201 08 

Lowell Coal Co 540 41 

T. J, McDonald 152 89 

H. E. Noyes & Son 42 24 

Paul Vigeant & Co 855 77 

O. D. Wilder 506 63 



Horses, Carriages, Llarnesses and 
Repairs : 

To Robert Barris 

A. L. Butman 

Donovan Harness Co 

F. B. Hill & Co 

Patrick Lally & Sons 

H. J. O'Dowd 

Sawyer Carriage Co 

J. H. Sparks 

Amount carried forward 



96 75 



94 66 



253 24 



2,788 94 



1 00 




11 30 




351 15 




52 00 




70 00 




26 00 




5 75 




6 10 






523 30 




$3,756 89 



AUDITOR S REPORT. 



65 



HEALTH YARD, SUNDRIES— Continued. 
Amount brought forward $3,756 89 

Lumber: 

To Burham & Davis 35 93 

Davis & Sargent 17 50 

Pratt & Forrest 50 75 

Amasa Pratt & Co 6 48 

Wm. H. Wignin 17 47 



Hardware, Pipe Fittings, etc. : 

To Adams Hardware & Paint Co. 

Boutwell Bros 

John Callaghan 

Farrell & Conaton 

Fitzpatrick & Welch 

E. P. Flanders & Co 

H. C. Girard 

W. A. Mack& Co 

Thompson Hardware Co 

Union File Co 

H. H. Wilder 

Painters' Supplies : 

To Adams Hardware & Paint Co. 

Sylvester Bean 

J. C. Bennett 

C. B. Coburn Co 

Walter Coburn & Co 

P. Dempsey & Co 

Laundering : 

To McNabb Bros 

Sundries : 

To B. & M. R. R 

A. W. Baker 

Willis H. Bean 

Bon Marche 

John Cross 



28 


69 


653 


15 


2 


92 


7 


78 


24 


94 


23 


50 


15 


73 


25 


44 


9 


96 


2 


25 


1 


00 


12 


97 


3 


65 


20 


80 


27 


60 


3 


00 


13 


75 


12 


89 


1 


25 


18 


00 


1 


50 


5 


00 


68 


50 



128 13 



795 36 



81 77 



12 89 



Amounts carried forward $94 25 $4,775 04 



66 



auditor's report. 



HEALTH YARD, SUNDRIES— Continued. 

Amounts brought forward $4,775 04 

G. M. Foster 

Daniel Gage 

C. H. Hanson & Co 

Geo. E. Hutchins 

Keefe Bros 

Frank McAvinue 

James Murkland & Son 

Frank E. McNabb 

Morse Coach Co 

N. E. T. & T. Co :.... 

O'Sullivan Bros. Co 

G. C. Prince & Son 

Shepard, Clark & Co 

W. A. Sherman 

J. H. Sparks 

Charles L. Sweetsir 

Simpson & Rowland 

Talbot Dye & Chemical Co. . 



9 


38 




7 


64 




10 


00 




11 


50 




1 


95 




10 


70 




43 


93 




4 


25 




8 


00 
90 




3 


75 




6 


00 




10 


80 




18 


00 




16 


00 




4 


75 




7 


95 




3 


64 


273 39 




— 






$5,048 43 







HEALTH, SMALL POX. 



Appropriation 



$1,010 02 



EXPENDITURES. 



$1,010 02 



Provisions, Fuel, Clothing, etc. : 
App. Lowell City Hospital Grain, 
Groceries and Provisions. . 

J. S. Brooks 

Edward Cawley 

Gilbride's 

O. F. Prentiss 

Amount carried forward 



94 


76 


10 


32 


14 


10 


5 


88 


22 


25 

14 







147 31 



$147 31 



auditor's report. 67 

HEALTH, SMALL POX— Continued. 
Amount brought forward $ 147 31 

Labor and Material : 

App. Public Buildings, Carpenters, 

Painters, etc 7 94 

7 94 

Physicians and Attendants : 

App. Health, Yard Labor 163 75 

J. F. Boyle 23 00 

John Dolan 130 00 

W. A. Johnson 30 00 

Mrs. Judd 70 00 

E. J. Livingston 174 00 

Frank McAvinue 51 80 

D. I F. Spinney ... 15 00 

G. B. Wilson 2 00 

— 659 55 

Medicines : 

To Charles E. Carter 15 58 

Ellingwood& Co 49 

Johnson & Johnson 76 80 

92 87 

Sundries : 

App. Health Office 42 85 

Fred A. Bates 39 50 

Mrs. Manuel Perry 20 00 

102 35 

$1 010 02 

HEALTH, CREMATOR CONSTRUCTION. 
Appropriation $10,000 00 

$10,000 00 

Balance undrawn Dec. 31, 1904 . . . $10,000 00 

$10,000 00 



68 auditor's report. 

HEATING CITY HALL AND MEMORIAL 
BUILDING, LABOR. 

Appropriation $3,000 00 

$3,000 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

To Sundry Persons for Labor 2,984 00 

Transferred to General Treasury 

Fund 16 00 

$3,000 00 



UW J *i'«l 



HEATING CITY HALL AND MEMORIAL 
BUILDING, FUEL. 

Appropriation $3,000 00 

Additional Appropriation 1,300 00 



$4,300 00 



EXPENDITURES. 



To Edward Cawley 3,968 16 

D. W. Home & Son 34 13 

Lowell Coal Co 297 71 



$4,300 00 



HEATING CITY HALL AND MEMORIAL 
BUILDING. SUNDRIES. 

Appropriation $600 00 

Additional Appropriation 44 38 



$644 38 



AUDITOR S REPORT. 



69 



HEATING CITY HALL AND MEMORIAL BUILDING 
SUNDRIES— Continued. 



EXPENDITURES. 

Repairs on Heating Apparatus : 

App. Water Works 

Boutwell Bros 

H. R. Barker Mfg. Co 

Harry S. Drury 

Farrell & Conaton 

D. J. Leary 

. Lubron Mfg. Co 

Star Brass Mfg. Co 

Scannell Boiler Works 

Welch Bros 



Oil, Waste, etc. : 

To Boston Engineers Supply Co. . 

C. B. Coburn Co 

H. C. Girard 

Kelty Bros 

Smith & Lawrence 

Hardware, etc. : 

To Adams Hardware & Paint Co. 

W. T. S. Bartlett 

Carroll Bros 

E. P. Flanders & Co 

H. C. Girard 

Smith & Lawrence 

Thompson Hardware Co 

Sundries : 

App. School Houses, Labor and 

Material 

Derby & Morse 

Man. & Con. Express Co 

Pratt & Forrest 

Daniel T. Sullivan 

Tucke & Parker 

Henry F. Whiting 



14 


25 


1 


20 


11 


G5 


1 


50 


2 


65 


52 


57 


7 


64 


27 


11 


6 


52 


355 


75 


47 


98 


24 


02 


4 


05 




60 


1 


88 


9 


00 


4 25 


1 


00 


2 


00 


1 


25 




75 


1 


86 


41 


38 


15 


60 




15 


1 


30 


1 


50 


4 


22 




75 



480 84 



78 53 



20 11 



64 90 



$644 38 



70 auditor's report. 

HUNTINGTON HALL. 

Appropriation $4,900 00 

$4,900 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

To Sundry Persons for Labor 1,688 09 

1,688 09 

Water : 

App. Water Works 61 49 

61 49 

Fuel : 

To Edward Cawley 823 45 

Lowell Coal Co.... 93 80 

917 25 

Rent : 

To B. & M. R. R 750 00 

750 00 

Lighting : 

To Lowell Gas Light Co 21 69 

Lowell Electric Light Corp. .. 555 50 

577 19 

Hardware, etc. : 

To Adams Hardware & Paint Co. 4 90 

P. J. Gusty & Co 4 50 

Thompson Hardware Co 35 

9 75 

Pipe Fittings, etc. : 

So H. R. Barker Mfg. Co 4 74 

John H. Barry 44 00 

J. D. Danahy 15 32 

H. J. Fitzpatrick 45 60 

Fitzpatrick & Welch 4 50 

George P. Green 12 87 

C. F. Hoisington & Son 2 10 

W. A. Mack & Co 96 

Middlesex Machine Co 36 73 

Welch Bros 165 77 

C. Zimmer 50 

i#*#$ * 333 09 

Amount carried forward $4,336 86 



AUDITORS REPORT. 



71 



HUNTINGTON HALL, SUNDRIES— Continued. 
Amount brought forward $4,336 8G 

Painters' Supplies : 

To Adams Hardware & Paint Co. 2 85 

C. B. Coburn Co 32 61 

Lowell Polish Co 14 50 

Willard W. Morrison 3 75 

53 71 

Sundries : 

To F. M. Bill & Co 2 08 

Bon Marche 50 

Derby & Morse 1 50 

Eagle Electric Co. 115 95 

Goldena Mfg. Co 18 00 

A. W. Lewis & Co 11 50 

G. C Prince & Son 7 50 

Talbot Dye & Chemical Co. . . 5 03 

J. H. Walker 3 45 

165 51 

__ 

4,556 08 
Transferred to General Treasury 

Fund 343 92 

$4,900 00 

RIFLE RANGE JANITOR. 

Appropriation $456 25 

$456 25 



72 auditor's report. 

RIFLE RANGE— Continued. 

EXPENDITURES. 

To Frank Burns 76 75 

C. L. Faneuf , ..: 11 88 

P. Grady 225 00 

J. Murray 77 50 

Waldo F. Miles .. 65 00 

456 13 

Transferred to General Treasury 

Fund 12 

$456 25 

RIFLE RANGE TAXES. 
Appropriation $87 96 

$87 96 

EXPENDITURES. 

To Town of Dracut, tax of 1904. . 79 45 

Transferred to General Treasury 

Fund 8 51 

87 96 

RIFLE RANGE TARGETS, PASTERS, SUPPLIES. 
Appropriation $84 88 

$84 88 

EXPENDITURES. 

To W. T. S. Bartlett 1 23 

Kelley & Brennan 18 36 

Amount carried forward $ 19 59 



auditor's report. 73 

RIFLE RANGE— Continued. 

Amount brought forward $ 19 59 

Kelty Bros 50 

Lull & Hartford 57 95 

C. H. May & Co 3 74 

Thompson Hardware Co 1 85 

83 63 

Transferred to General Treasury 

Fund 1 25 

$84 88 
RIFLE RANGE REPAIRS. 

Appropriation $70 91 

Additional Appropriation . 75 

$71 66 

EXPENDITURES. 

To Sundry Persons for Labor ... 30 75 

App. School Houses Labor. . . 4 66 

E. P. Flanders & Co 81 

A. W. Lewis & Co 35 44 

$71 66 

RIFLE RANGE, IMPROVEMENTS AT RANGE. 

Appropriation $300 00 

$300 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

To Sundry Persons for Labor. . . . 101 48 
App. School Houses, Work 

and Material..... 39 33 

App. Public Buildings, Material 2 10 

P. P. Conners & Co 29 10 

Amount carried forward. . $172 01 



74 



AUDITOR S REPORT. 



RIFLE RANGE— Continued. 
Amount brought forward $ 172 01 

Eagle Electric Co. 

A. W. Lewis & Co 

Lull & Hartford 

A. L. Ready & Son 

Thompson Hardware Co .... 
Wm. H. Wiggin 

Transferred to General Treasury 
Fund 



INCIDENTALS. 

Appropriation $2,750 00 



53 23 




2 00 




12 00 




20 44 




3 30 




36 96 






2QQ 94 




06 



EXPENDITURES. 

Stationery, Printing, Typewriting, 

etc. : 
To Frances E. Andrews. 

Courier-Citizen Co 

Daily Mail Publishing Co. . . . 

Helen A. Dimon. ... 

Dumas & Co 

Libby Printing Co 

Lowell Sun 

M. A. Ordway 

G. C. Prince & Son 

Sunday Telegiam 

Union Printing Co. 



Entertainments and Refreshments 

To Merrimac House 

New American 

D. L. Page Co 

F. E. Putnam 

Waverly Hotel 



5 


00 


92 


90 


12 


55 


14 


72 


252 


58 


198 


68 


26 


60 


28 


00 


425 


22 


3 


53 


284 


50 


25 


80 


13 


00 


18 


60 


10 


90 


145 


00 



$300 00 



,-, ^■.-m.,al. *.-*.*. i — nfei 



$2,750 00 



1,344 28 



213 30 



Amount carried forward $1,557 58 



auditor's report. 75 

INCIDENTALS— Continued. 
Amount brought forward $1,557 58 

Carriage hire : 

To Joseph Albert 8 00 

George Chapman 3 50 

F. F. McNulty.... 20 00 

Morse Coach Co 4 00 

J. H. Sparks 27 00 

62 50 

Sundries : 

To American Express Co . 5 50 

John F. Conners 158 00 

Commonwealth of Mass 1 00 

M. G.Gardner 493 00 

Alvin Lawrence 50 00 

J. A. Mercier 37 28 

J. F. McElholm G 00 

Middlesex Safe Deposit and 

Trust Co 50 00 

W. G. Page 2 75 

Charles F. Young & Co 150 00 

953 53 

2,573 Gl 
Transferred to General Treasury 

Fund 176 39 

$2,750 00 

INSURANCE. 

Appropriation $5,474 14 

$5,474 14 

EXPENDITURES. 

To Frank M. Brogan 67 00 

Brown & Dewar 180 28 

Joseph A. Bruley 94 00 

Amount carried forward $341 28 



7(5 



AUDITOR S REPORT. 



INSURANCE— Continued. 



Amount brought forward 

Fred C. Church 

Geo. B. Coburn 

Arthur L. Gray 

Geo. D. Kimball 

Thos. C. Lee & Co .......... 

Ezra E. Mansur 

Geo. E. Metcalf & Co 

Henry Miller & Co 

N. G. Norcross 

Jas. Murphy & Son 

Joseph Peabody, Agent. 

Eugene G. Russell 

Smith & Cavanaugh. ... 

E. M. Tucke 

Graham R. Whidden 

Herbert A. Wright 

Transferred to General Treasury 
Fund 



$ 341 28 



Appropriation 

Additional Appropriation. 



2,200 91 




120 78 




56 00 




120 78 




480 78 




73 78 




180 28 




120 78 




530 28 




120 78 


V 


461 78 


47 CO 




94 00 




123 78 


- 


120 78 




94 00 






5 287 77 




186 37 


$5,474 14 




*IES. 




$4,826 00 




2 01 






$4,828 01 



EXPENDITURES. 

To William A. Hogan 3,000 00 

App. of Police Salaries and 

Labor, Services of M. E. 

McDonald 1,200 01 

Frances E. Andrews 628 00 

LAW SUNDRIES. 
Appropriation $800 00 



$4,828 01 



$S00 00 



auditor's report. 77 

LAW, SUNDRIES— Continued. 

EXPENDITURES. 

Books, Stationery, Printing, etc. : 

To Courier-Citizen Co 3 00 

Dumas & Co 1 50 

H. C. Kittredge 55 

Thomas H. Lawler 7 50 

Lawler Printing Co 8 50 

Lawyers Co-operation Publish- 
ing Co 26 00 

Little, Brown & Co 28 70 

G. C. Prince & Son 26 60 

Review & Record Co 5 00 

Wylie & Sanborn . 1 88 

Sampson, Murdock & Co 3 00 

Smith Premier Typewriter Co. 1 50 

Frank Shepard & Co 3 00 

Edward Thompson & Co 22 50 

Union Printing Co 19 60 

158 83 



Professional Services and Witness 
Fees : 

To William A. Hogan 285 50 

Francis W. Qua 91 85 

George F. Stiles 16 00 



Transportation, Carriage hire, etc. : 

To American Express Co 85 

G. W. Chapman 1 50 

O. P. Davis 67 00 

Keefe & Horan 2 00 

Morse Coach Co 10 60 

J. H. Sparks 62 70 



Telephone, etc. : 

To N. E. T. & T. Co 7 30 

W. U. T. Co 66 



393 35 



144 65 



7 96 



Amount carried forward $ 704 79 



78 auditor's report. 

LAW, SUNDRIES— Continued. 
Amount brought forward . $704 79 

Sundries : 

To Frances E. Andrews 2 55 

J. D. Bartley 1 50 

A. G. Pollard & Co . . .' 15 

A. H. Sanborn & Co 5 25 

9 45 

714 24 
Transferred to General Treasury 

Fund 85 76 

$8U0 00 
LIBRARY. 

Appropriation $16,000 00 

$16,000 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

To Trustees City Library $16,000 00 

$16,000 00 
LIGHTING STREETS. 
Appropriation $101,645 00 

$101,645 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

To Sundry Persons for Labor 1,008 00 

Lowell Electric Light Corp. . . 63,327 75 

Lowell Gas Light Co. , Gas . . . 105 6(^ 
Welsbach St. Lighting Co. of 

A., Gas 25,577 47 

Welsbach St. Lighting Co. of 

A., Gasoline 11,182 51 

101,201 39 

Transferred to General Treasury 

Fund 443 61 

$101,645 00 



auditor's report. 79 

LIGHTING PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 
Appropriation $30 00 

$30 00 



$30 00 



$300 00 



EXPENDITURES 

To Lowell Gas Light Co 20 34 

Transferred to General Treasury 

Fund 9 66 

MM 

LIGHTING, SUNDRIES. 
Appropriation $300 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

To B. & M. R. R., Tickets 20 00 

Buckland Printing Co 2 50 

Butterfield Printing Co ... 8 00 

O. P. Davis 4 00 

Thos. H. Lawler . 3 35 

Lowell Gas Light Co 83 88 

G. C. Prince & Son 10 00 

Waverly Hotel 13 00 

Welch Bros 2 64 

147 37 

Transferred to General Treasury 

Fund 152 63 

$300 00 



80 auditor's report. 

LIGHTING, NEW LIGHTS. 

Appropriation $300 00 

$300 00 

Returned to General Treasury 

Fund 300 00 

$300 00 
LIQUOR LICENSES. 

Appropriation $43,250 00 

$43,250 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

To Commonwealth of Mass 42,974 00 

Transferred to General Treasury 

Fund 276 00 

$43,250 00 

PARKS, SALARIES AND LABOR. 

Appropriation $9,000 00 

Additional Appropriation 1 38 

$9,001 38 

EXPENDITURES. 

To Charles A. Whittet, Supt 1,199 96 

Sundry Persons for Labor. . . . 7,249 43 

App. for Engineering 61 24 

Geo. A. Nelson 16 25 

A. Parsons •. 7 40 

J. T. Williamson 17 10 

8,551 38 

Transferred to General Treasury 

Fund 450 00 

$9,001 38 



AUDITOR S REPORT. 



81 



PARKS, SUNDRIES. 

Appropriation $3,000 00 

Additional Appropriation 450 00 

Receipts App. Care of City Hall 

Sundries 12 49 

App. Parks, Care of Trees , , 82 10 



$3,544 59 



EXPENDITURES. 



Lumber: 

To Pratt & Forrest 

Wm. H. Wiggin 

Pipe Fittings, etc. : 

To H. R. Barker Mfg. Co 

Carroll Bros 

Farrell & Conaton 

Charles E. Gee , 

C. N. Rice & Son 

Union Iron Foundry 

H. H. Wilder & Co 

Carriages, Harnesses, Repairs, etc. : 
To Donovan Harness Co 

F. B. Hill & Co 

J. H. Laporte 

Shoeing Horses : 

To Cahill Bros 

M. J. Cahill 

Owen J. Carney 

John J. Donnelly 

Plants, Shrubs, Trees, Loam, etc. : 

To Alphonse Bibeault 

P . Conroy 

Follansbee Nursery 

J. J. McManmon 

Amounts carried forward 



53 31 

100 06 



88 88 

4 00 

133 21 

31 95 
1 55 

62 30 

11 06 



27 20 
78 05 
27 19 



11 20 
20 75 
19 00 
25 00 



23 85 
25 31 
33 75 

100 75 



153 37 



332 95 



132 35 



75 95 



$183 66 



$694 62 



82 auditor's report. 

PARK SUNDRIES— Continued. 

Amounts brought forward $183 66 $694 62 

P. O'Hearn 

Reading Nursery 

Schlegel & Fottler Co 

Sherman & Martin 

Whittet & Co 

Burton H' Wiggins 



Painters' Supplies : 

To Adams Hardware & Paint Co. 

J. C. Bennett 

C. B. Coburn Co 

Talbot Dye & Chemical Co. . . 

Hardware, etc. : 

To C. Crevier , 

Boutwell Bros 

F. W. Cheney & Co 

E. P. Flanders & Co ' 

C. F. Keyes & Co 

W. A. Mack & Co 

Steel Basket Co 

Thompson Hardware Co 

Stationery, Printing, etc. : 

To Bntterfield Printing Co 

Colonial Press 

Dumas & Co 

Thomas H. Lawler 

Libbey Printing Co 

G. C. Prince & Son 

Sampson, Murdock & Co. . . . 
Tilton & Co 

Hay, Grain, etc. : 

To Charles Dumas & Co 

Fred A. Fox 

Livingston Grain Co 

T. J. McDonald 



3 


15 


20 


00 




50 


42 


35 


341 


19 


1 


50 


14 


91 


26 


09 


14 


65 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


98 


12 


30 


157 


41 


4 


25 




90 


15 


00 


3 


52 


216 


14 


1 


00 


4 


75 


3 


00 


3 


50 


26 


00 


3 


00 


1 


75 


40 


60 


61 


95 


65 


97 


29 


65 



592 35 



56 65 



196 36 



259 14 



Amounts carried forward $198 17 $1,799 12 



AUDITOR S REPORT. 



83 



PARK SUNDRIES— Continued. 



Amounts brought forward 

Joseph Mullin 

H. E. Noyes & Son 

G. W. Trull 

Paul Vigeant & Co 

O. D. Wilder 

Horses, Carriage hire, etc. : 

App. Streets Sundries 

C. H. Hanson & Co 

Morse Coach Co 

Sundries • 

App. Water Works 

4 ' Streets, Sundries 

l% Sewer Maintenance, Sundries 
" Engineering 

American Express 

George E. Bennett 

B. & M. R. R ... 

B. &N. St. Ry 

F. M. Bill & Co 

George Bowers 

Boulger Shoe Co 

Edward Cawley 

Conners Bros 

P. Conroy 

C. T. Clifford 

Bridget Cookin 

R. J. Haight 

A. N. Harmon 

L. C. Hall 

Fred E. Jones 

Keefe & Horan 

A. W. Lewis & Co 

Lowell Electric Light Corp. . . 

Joseph Mullin 

N. E. T. & T. Co 

N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R..., 
P. O'Hearn 

Amounts carried forward 



$198 17 



1,799 12 



59 


32 


43 


70 


113 


35 


15 


31 


25 


32 


51 


96 


175 


80 


1 


50 


30 


24 


57 


71 


22 


00 


136 


46 


1 


15 


2 


13 


42 


35 


100 


00 


3 


75 


2 


15 


4 


25 


36 


80 


33 


25 


5 


32 


13 


50 


2 


13 


1 


00 


2 


70 


116 


32 


165 


00 


2 


00 


53 


95 


8 


63 


7 


72 


15 


85 


1 


28 


116 


60 



455 07 



229 26 



$984 24 $2,483 45 



84 



auditor's report. 



PARK SUNDRIES— Continued. 



Amounts brought forward 

J. Peabody 

A. Parsons 

Victor Pihl 

C. N. Rice & Son... 
Robertson & Co .... 

W. A. Sherman 

Daniel T. Sullivan. . . 
Charles A. Whittet . 

James Welch 

A. C. Wheelock 



Transferred to General Treasury 
Fund 



$984 24 $2,483 45 



28 80 




2 30 




65 




15 




50 




3 50 




31 60 




2 04 




25 




7 00 






1,061 03 






3,544 48 




11 


$3,544 59 





PARKS, CARE OF TREES. 



Appropriation, 
Receipts 



$1,000 00 
3 25 



KXl'KNDITURKS, 



$1,003 25 



App. Parks Sundries 

Sundry Persons for Labor 
Adams Hardware & Paint Co. 

Butterfield Printing Co 

J. C. .Bennett 

Boutwell Bros 

Courier-Citizen Co 

C. B. Coburn Co 

E. P. Flanders & Co 

H. L. Gonzales 

F. B. Hill & Co 

Amount carried forward 



82 10 

451 58 

27 75 

1 25 
37 45 

2 84 
7 50 

26 34 

79 35 

5 75 

206 85 






$928 76 



auditor's report 85 

\ 

PARKS, CARE OF TREES— Continued. 

Amount brought forward $928 76 

C. F. Keyes 40 00 

James F. Mooney 2 50 

A. Parsons 4 90 

Pratt & Forrest. 1 25 

C. N. Rice & Son 3 35 

Thompson Hardware Co. .... 11 28 

Charles A. Whittet ' 1 95 

999 99 

Transferred to General Treasury 

Fund 3 26 



$1,003 25 



PARKS, MOTHS. 
Appropriation $500 00 



$500 00 



Balance undrawn Dec. 31, 1904 . . . $500 00 



$500' 00 



LOWELL CITY HOSPITAL AND ALMSHOUSE, 

SALARIES. 



Appropriation $2,700 00 



$2,700 00 



EXPENDITURES. 



To Charles E. Donlan, Supt 2,000 00 

Edward O. Tabor, City Physi- 
cian 233 33 

Forster II. Smith, City Physi- 
cian 466 67 



$2,700 00 



86 



auditor's report. 



LOWELL CITY HOSPITAL AND ALMSHOUSE, 

LABOR. 



Appropriation 

Additional Appropriation. 



$11,617 89 
1,000 59 



$12,618 48 



EXPENDITURES. 



To Sundry Persons for Labor. 



12,618 48 



$12,618 48 



LOWELL CITY HOSPITAL AND ALMSHOUSE, 
GRAIN, GROCERIES AND PROVISIONS. 

Appropriation $20,000 00 

Additional Appropriation 3,882 02 

Receipts App. Paupers, O. D. R. 

General Sundries 8,636 00 

App. Health Office Sundries 14 60 

App. Health, Small Pox 94 76 



EXPENDITURES. 



$32,627 38 



To C. M. Allen 

Armour & Co 

E. J. Barrett 

James Boyle & Sons. 

Owen E. Brennan . . . 

-F. M. Bill & Co.... 

G. J. & D. Bradt . . . 

Peter J. Brady 

Breen Bros 

M. Calnin 

Central Cash Market 
J. B. Cover & Co . . . 
C. P. Comerford. . . . 

Amount carried forward . . 



97 82 

78 75 

9 50 

285 62 

164 57 

1,733 09 

39 94 

1,326 62 

48 45 

22 14 

29 12 

62 50 

245 30 



$4,143 42 



auditor's report. 87 

LOWELL CITY HOSPITAL^AND ALMSHOUSE, GRAIN, 
GROCERIES AND PROVISIONS— Continued. 

Amount brought forward $4,143 42 

Coffey Bros 4,958,86 

C. G. Coburn 516,55 

John P. Curley 11 18 

M. Donovan & Co 21 75 

S. K. Dexter 391 67 

Hugh Duggan 7 50 

F. L. Emerson 4 00 

W. P. Foye 206 49 

Thomas B. Fahey 1,334 27 

James E. Freeman 169 45 

Fleischmann & Co 141 30 

Joseph Flynn 281 40 

J. W. Green 93 25 

Frank M. Harrington 34 00 

G. H. Hammond & Co 61 20 

Haynes & Bean Ill 05 

J. S. Herrick 241 00 

W. A. Ingham & Co ... 475 17 

J. J. Johnson 45 00 

Keefe Bros 60 95 

Lee Bros 246 98 

Lowell Packing & Provision 

Co 4,601 03 

Lowell Pharmacy 50 

Mansfield, Witham & Co. ... 1,271 30 

J. McGlinchey 145 10 

M. McGlinchey 41 55 

Joseph Mullin 51 00 

A. E. Morse 47 25 

A. L. Macrae 357 48 

John J. McCann 30 30 

McKinley Bros 10 25 

T. J. McDonald 299 75 

William J. Murphy 36 99 

T. F. McKay 81 00 

Carl Noyes 86 52 

H. E. Noyes & Son 3,559 56 

F. Murphy 90 00 

Owen Nerney 27 85 

Amount carried forward $24,293 87 



88 auditor's report. 

LOWELL CITY HOSPITAL AND ALMSHOUSE, GRAIN, 
GROCERIES AND PROVISIONS— Continued. 

Amount brought forward $ 24,293 87 

Oakdale Mfg. Co 105 00 

P. J. O'Brien 146 02 

O'Brien Bros 282 86 

O'Donnell & Gilbride Co 139 90 

John J. Payne 19 35 

Pawtucketville Cash Grocery.. 326 16 

Philbrick & Wood 221 38 

A. G. Pollard & Co 182 42 

C. F. Pihl 54 40 

G. E. Putnam & Son 1,170 71 

G. C. Prince & Son 2 00 

D. L. Phillips 1 30 

Fred H. Rourke 502 50 

J. B. Sabre 9 75 

John F. Saunders 232 80 

T. E. Sheehan 91 60 

Simpson & Rowland 650 40 

E. M. Slayton & Co 163 04 

T. A. D. Sullivan & Co 102 31 

Swift & Co 120 00 

Swift & Bailey . 3,065 03 

E. Whitcomh 78 72 

Charles W. Wilder 339 96 

O. D. Wilder 325 90 

$32,627 38 



auditor's report. 89 

LOWELL CITY HOSPITAL AND ALMSHOUSE, 

SUNDRIES. 

Appropriation $16,500 00 

Additional Appropriation 5,864 17 

Receipts App. Paupers O. D. R. 

General Sundries 1,311 00 



EXPENDITURES. 

Fuel: 

To John Brady . 

Edward Cawlev 

D. W. Home & Son 

Home Coal Co 

Lowell Coal Co 

Joseph Mullin 

F. Murphy 

Daniel T. Sullivan 



Water, Lighting, Telephone : 

App. Water Works. 

Lowell Electric Light Corp 

Lowell Gas Light Co 

N. E. T. & T. Co 



Clothing, Dry Goods, etc.: 

To Bon Marche 

Boulger Shoe Co 

Centralville Millinery Store. . . 

J . L. Chalifoux 

J. Drain 

Patrick Fitzgibbon J . 

Gilbride's " 

James E. Gorman 

James D. Haley 

T. H. Kelley & Co 

Kelley Bros 

C. H. Kimball & Co 

John J . Lonergan 

Lowell One Price Clothing Co. 

Amounts carried forward 



$23,675 17 



32 00 




2,613 91 




259 75 




32 84 




3,255 71 




82 62 




176 44 




1,480 83 






7,934 10 




1,895 05 




162 77 




1,248 95 




27 00 






3,333 77 




289 50 




55 15 




48 00 




119 00 




213 39 




118 80 




167 02 




63 00 




25 20 




179 00 




42 00 




199 83 




56 35 




208 00 




$1,784 24 


$11,267 87 



90 



AUDITOR S REPORT. 



LOWELL CITY HOSPITAL AND ALMSHOUSE 
SUNDRIES— Continued. 



Amounts brought forward 

Mass. State Prison 

Mass. Reformatory 

Merrimack Clothing Co. ..... 

F. R. McKinley 

G'Donnell Dry Goods Co 

Parthenais Bros 

A, G. Pollard & Co 

Putnam & Son Co 

J. E. Shanley & Co 

Sunlight Shoe Store 

Talbot Clothing Co 

Furniture, Repairs, etc. : 

To W. F. Devlin 

John J. Doherty & Co 

Gookin Bros 

James T. Henry & Co 

Robertson & Co 

H. C. McOsker 

Hardware and Tools : 

To Adams Hardware & Paint Co. 

Boutwell Bros 

W. T. S. Bartlett 

Owen E. Brennan 

John Callaghan 

T. W. Cheney & Co 

E. P. Flanders & Co 

Hanscom Hardware Co 

N. D. Lafleur 

Phillips & Hill 

Thompson Hardware Co 

Pipe Fittings, etc. : 
To American Safe and Lock 
Works 

Carroll Bros 

Harry S. Drury 

Amounts carried forward 



$1,784 24 $11,267 87 

636 60 
150 00 
130 25 

50 75 

23 92 

13 65 
201 *2 

39 70 

32 56 

27 50 

90 00 
3,180 99 



90 10 
96 84 
11 75 
13 75 
7 10 
66 00 



91 02 

5 07 

70 

17 95 

1 48 

86 60 

131 57 

1 20 
19 00 

1 00 
12 20 



23 20 
41 74 

22 25 



285 54 



367 79 



$87 19 $15,102 19 



auditor's report. 91 

LOWELL CITY HOSPITAL AND ALMSHOUSE 
SUNDRIES— Continued. 

Amounts brought forward $87 19 $15,102 19 

Doane Steam Pump Co 2 50 

Empire Laundry Machinery 

Co 

Farrell & Conaton 

Charles E. Gee 

George P. Green 

Locke Regulator Co 

D. Leary 

W. A. Mack & Co 

W. McLarney & Co 

W. M. McElholm 

Scannell Boiler Works 

Welch Bros 

H. H. Wilder & Co 



Lumber : 

To Burnham & Davis Lumber Co. 
Davis & Sargent Lumber Co. . 



Pratt & Forrest 

William H. Wiggin. 



Painiers and Electricians Supplies : 

To Adams Hardware & Paint Co. 

Sylvester Bean 

C. B. Coburn Co .... 

F. M. Griffin & Co 

A. L. Kittredge & Co 

Willard W. Morrison 

Smith & Lawrence 

Stationery, Printing, etc. : 

To J. Hary Boardman 

Courier-Citizen Co 

Daily Mail Publishing Co 

Thomas H. Lawler 

Osmond Long 

Library Bureau 



36 


25 


53 


32 


1 


25 


150 


36 


13 


66 


4 08 


14 


65 


21 


12 


1 


20 


11 


75 


147 


52 


31 


35 


33 


64 


110 


00 


20 


11 


604 


11 


173 


65 


87 


86 


129 


48 


50 


00 


4 


00 


7 


50 


6 


75 


1 


50 


6 00 


76 


30 


29 


75 




60 


16 


50 



576 20 



767 86 



459 24 



Amounts carried forward $130 65 $16,905 49 



92 



AUDITORS REPORT. 



LOWELL CITY HOSPITAL AND ALMSHOUSE 
SUNDRIES— Continued. 



Amounts brought forward 

G. C. Prince & Son 

Sampson, Murdock & Co. . . . 

Mason Work and Material : 

To Mahan &' Meehan 

D. T. Sullivan 

Drugs, Medicines, etc. : 

To Belvidere Family Drug Store. 

F. H. Butler & Co 

Charles E Carter 

Carleton & Hovey 

Columbiau Insecticide Co . . . 

Concord Drug Store 

P. Dempsey & Co 

Davies, Rose & Co 

P. H. Donohue & Co 

Ellingwood & Co 

Falls & Burkinshaw 

Frye & Crawford 

Edward Gallagher 

Fred Howard 

R. J. Lang & Co 

Leach & Green 

E. A. McQuade 

Frank E. McNabb 

E. T. McEvoy 

W. H. Pearson 

A. F. Story & Co 

A. J. Swan 

Talbot Dye & Chemical Co . . 

H. L. Timmons 

H. E. Webster & Co 

Zopher Co 

Carriages, Harnesses and Repairs 

To A. L. Butman 

Donovan Harness Co 

Amounts carried forward 



$130 


65 


$16,905 49 


26 


42 




3 


00 


160 07 


13 


80 




70 


70 


84 50 


14 


70 




16 


00 




73 


55 




8 


51 




216 


66 




20 95 




55 


00 




50 00 




5 


00 




15 


40 




84 


15 




11 


50 




206 


13 




12 


50 




157 


15 




6 


00 




116 


28 




46 


15 




28 


30 




12 


75 




37 


90 




13 


00 




156 


66 




192 


43 




374 


15 




45 00 








1,975 82 






13 


50 




237 


16 




$250 


66 


$19,125 88 



auditor's report. 93 

LOWELL CITY HOSPITAL AND ALMSHOUSE 
SUNDRIES— Continued. 

Amounts brought forward $250 66 $19,125 88 

F. B. Hill & Co 

P. A. MacKenzie 

H. J. O'Dowd 

M. T. Rafferty 

Sawyer Carriage Co 

W. H. Ward 



Shoeing Horses : 

To James Blakely 

Cahill Bros 

M. J. Cahill 

Owen J. Carney 

T. J. Donnelly 

C. Desmond 

M. J. Haggerty 

A. D. Mitten 

Henry Reynolds 

Sundries : 

To C. M. Allen 

American Express Co 

Automatic Time Stamp Co 
F..M. Bill & Co 

B. & M. R. R 

Peter J. Brady 

Buckley Bros 

J. E. Buerk 

John J. Cluin 

C. G. Coburn 

J. B. Cover & Co 

John Cross 

Cypher Incubator Co 

Joseph Dextra 

Charles M. Dickey 

W. A. Dickinson 

C. A. Donlan 

Joseph Fay 



33 


25 


21 


70 


156 


50 


75 


00 


52 


67 


22 


00 


1 


75 


10 


40 


12 


85 


37 


50 


52 


05 


81 


00 


10 


75 


2 


25 


40 


30 


2 


50 


5 


55 


3 


00 


14 30 


133 


20 


105 


83 


67 


65 


1 


80 


2 


50 


203 


25 


9 


50 


30 00 


1 


20 


4 


80 


12 50 


228 


24 


28 


00 


28 


38 



611 78 



248 85 



Amounts carried forward $882 20 $19,986 51 



94 



auditor's report. 



LOWELL CITY HOSPITAL AND ALMSHOUSE 
SUNDRIES— Continued. 



Amounts brought forward 

William P. Foye .'. 

James E. Freeman 

Daniel Gage 

H. L. Gonzales 

J. W. Green 

Greenwood Bros. , 

Charles T. Haskell 

C. F. Hatch & Co 

Joseph Hebert. . . 

J. Edward Hoole 

George E. Hutchins 

W. A. Ingham Co 

J. B. A. Johnson 

William Jones 

Thomas H. Kelley 

E. Kemp 

Leach & Green 

Lowell Rubber Co 

A. L. Macrae 

J. J. Magee 

Man. & Con. Express Co. 

Mellin Loan Office 

Middlesex Ice Co 

J. Murkland & Son 

William J . Murphy 

P. H. McCarthy 

J.J. McManmon 

McKinley Bros 

Charles E. Munn 

John F. Mc Aside 

Frank Notini 

National Thermometer Co 
N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. 

O'Brien Bros 

O'Donnell Bros 

John Powell 

J. Quirbach 

Harry T. Richardson 
Ring Music Co 

Amounts carried forward 



$882 20 $19,986 51 



123 15 




9 15 




83 72 




2 70 




4 72 




82 13 




1 80 




4 00 




66 00 




88 65 




43 33 




49 50 




9 00 




5 00 




36 00 




25 00 




3 00 




1 80 




26 22 


- 


3 25 




30 




15 00 




206 82 




70 34 




3 25 




77 00 




60 68 




3 60 




8 00 




160 00 




266 00 




36 25 




88 




132 09 




120 00 




3 00 




76 00 




1 05 




1 50 




$2,792 08 


$19,986 51 



auditor's report. 95 

LOWELL CITY HOSPITAL AND ALMSHOUSE 
SUNDRIES— Continued. 

Amaunts brought forward $2,792 08 $19,986 51 

Randlett Bros 1 25 

Rice& Co 8 00 

A. P. Robertson 6 00 

Robertson & Bartlett 280 80 

Robertson & Co 8 00 

Henry Shaw ' 2 15 

W. A. Sherman 3 00 

E. M. Slayton & Co 94 88 

Simpson & Rowland 91 75 

Town of Chelmsford 66 00 

Talbot Dye & Chemical Co. . . 11 90 

Ernest Towle 22 00 

H. H. Wilder 8 50 

Wright & Taylor 95 90 

Wheeler & Wilson Mfg. Co. . . 45 
Whitman & Pratt Rendering 

Co 196 00 

3,688 66 



$23,675 17 



PAUPERS, OUT-DOOR RELIEF, SALARIES. 
Appropriation $3,785 00 



$3,785 00 



EXPENDITURES 



To Martin J. Courtney, Secretary, 1,800 00 

James F. Walsh, Clerk 144 26 

Nellie A. Keyes, Clerk 945 70 

John F. Courtney, Clerk 160 65 

William H. Gallagher, Clerk. 734 39 



3,785 00 



96 



AUDITOR S REPORT. 



PAUPERS, OUT-DOOR RELIFF, OFFICE SUNDRIES 
AND TRANSPORTATION. 



Appropriation 

Additional Appropriation. . 



$800 00 
25 86 



EXPENDITURES. 



Stationery, Printing, Posting, etc. 
To J. D. Bartley 

Carter's Ink Co 

Courier-Citizen Co 

H. C. Derby 

Dumas & Co 

Hobbs & Warren Co. 

Thomas H. Lawler 

Lawler Printing Co 

Libby Printing Co 

Lyon Platinum Pen Co 

Pneumatic Hand Stamp Co. 

G. C. Prince & Son 

Sampson, Murdock & Co. . . 

The Dodge Co 

Sundries : 

To American Express Co 

B. & M. R. R 

M. J. Courtney 

Franklin Hotel 

Gilbride's 

Morse Coach Co 

N. E. T. & T. Co 

J. F. O'Donnell & Sons , ... 

O'Sullivan Bros. Co 

J. H. Sparks 

Fannie S. White 

W. U. Telegraph Co 



3 50 

38 

16 25 

5 55 
19 25 

6 50 
2 40 

36 00 
23 00 
6 00 
2 78 
9 50 
6 00 
1 50 



70 

389 26 

212 90 

3 25 

35 

1 75 

5 05 

30 50 
1 50 
9 50 

31 00 
1 49 



$825 86 



138 61 



687 25 

$825 86 



AUDITOR S REPORT. 



97 



PAUPERS, OUT-DOOR RELIEF, GENERAL 

SUNDRIES. 



Appropriation $39,000 00 

Additional Appropriation 9,359 95 

Receipts, App. Soldiers Relief. ... 77 80 

Sundry Persons 58 40 



48,496 15 



EXPENDITURES. 



Ambulance Drivers : 

To J. J. Cuff 

J. F. Geoghegan 

M. J. Gray 

M. F. McDermott 

G. B. McKenna 

J. McGlynn 

D. Shea 

Ambulance Surgeon : 

To Patrick E. Sullivan 

Water, Lighting and Telephone : 

App. Water Works 

Lowell Gas Light Co 

N. E. T. & T. Co........ 

W. U. Telegraph Co 

Hay, Grain, etc. : 

To George M. Foster 

W. P. Foye& Co 

Joseph. Mullin. 

Paul Vigeant & Co 

Shoeing Horses : 

To Cahill Bros 

M. J. Cahill 

Owen J. Carney 

Henry Reynolds 

Amount carried forward 



60 00 
784 29 
705 00 
724 29 

784 29 
784 29 
705 00 



600 00 



18 


00 


38 


79 


39 


69 


1 


00 


31 


05 


744 


76 


30 


75 


64 86 


30 


00 


13 


30 


39 


75 


43 


55 



4,547 16 



600 00 



97 48 



.871 42 



126 60 



$6,242 66 



98 



AUDITOR S REPORT. 



PAUPERS, OUT-DOOR RELIEF, GENERAL 
SUNDRIES— Continued. 

Amount brought forward $G,242 66 

Repairing Carriages and Harnesses : 
To A. L. Butman 

Charles Crevier 

Donovan Harness Co 

H. J. O'Dowd 

Sawyer Carriage Co 

J. H. Sparks 



k t 



Veterinary : 

To A. W. Baker 

W. A. Sherman 

Sundries : 

App. School Houses, Labor 

Public Buildings, Carpenters, 
Painters, etc 

C. B. Coburn Co 

F. W. Cheeney & Co 

John P. Curley 

Daniel Gage 

George E. Hutchins 

Keefe Bros 

Merrimack Steam Laundry .... 

McNabb Bros 

Joseph Mullin 

N. E. Steam Laundry 

T. Murphy 

J. H. Sparks 



Dispensary, Clerk : 

To Edwin F. Mason 1,046 67 



5 


60 


51 


15 


177 


15 


31 


10 


112 


36 




25 


6 


00 


3 


00 


5 


50 


186 


10 


2 


23 


3 


00 


3 


90 


4 


70 


6 05 


4 


20 


7 


75 


25 


41 


402 


12 


13 


44 


91 


50 


104 


15 



Dispensary, Supplies : 

To Belvidere Family Drug Store. . 75 00 

F. H. Butler & Co. . . '. 3 00 

Concord Drug Store 55 09 



377 61 



9 00 



860 05 



7,489 32 
1,046 67 



Amounts carried forward $133 09 $8,535 99 



AUDITOR S REPORT. 



99 



PAUPERS, OUT-DOOR RELIEF, GENERAL 
SUNDRIES— Continued. 



Amounts brought forward. . . . 

Carter & Sherburne. ...... 

Clinton Mfg. Co 

Charles E. Carter 

A. W. Dows & Co 

Peter H. Donohue 

Ellingwood & Co 

Falls & Burkinshaw 

W. A. Ingham Co 

Albert Johnson 

J. B. A. Johnson 

R. J. Lang & Co 

Lowell Pharmacy 

E. A. McQuade 

Frank E. McNabb 

A. F. Story & Co 

Simpson & Rowland*. . . . 
Zopher Co 

Physicians : 

To John F. Boyle 

P. Brunelle 

Charles M. Frye 

T. J. Halloran 

A. J. Halpin 

J. E. Leary 

J. N. Marston 

O. P. Porter 

M. Trudeau 

Stationery, Printing, etc. : 

To Butterfield Printing Co. . . 

Courier-Citizen Co 

Dumas & Co 

T. H. Lawler 

Osmond Long 

G. C. Prince & Son 

Sampson, Murdock & Co. 

F. A. M. Tobin 

Amounts carried forward 



$133 09 $8,535 99 

1 27 

24 00 
111 00 

85.08 

26 00 

132 83 

50 

17 86 

12 00 

84 90 
245 44 

12 00 

147 94 

7 25 

32 85 

15 65 

25 91 

1,115 57 



228 30 

226 03 
16 65 

227 68 
351 28 
208 92 

40 00 

285 61 

5 00 



4 25 
4 50 
8 25 

6 00 

7 00 

2 00 

3 00 
43 50 



1,589 47 



78 50 



$1 1,319*53 



100 



AUDITOR S REPORT. 



PAUPERS, OUT-DOOR RELIEF, GENERAL 
SUNDRIES— Continued. 



Amount brought forward 

Interments : 

App. Public Buildings, Bills for 

Materials 

App. Public Buildings, Labor 

App. Public Buildings, Carpenters, 

Painters, etc 

App. School Houses v Labor 

App. School Houses, Work and 
Material 

Joseph Albert 

Amedee Archambault 

Napoleon Bilodeau 

Peter Davey 

Horace Ela 

John J. Higgins 

J. H. McDermott 

J. W T . McKenna 

Charles H. Molloy 

J. J. 0'Connell& Co 

J. F. O'Donnell & Sons 

Peter H. Savage 

John A. Weinbeck ... 

Support out of Almshouse: 

City of Beverly 

Boston. '. 

Cambridge 

Chelsea 

Fall River 

Haverhill 

Holyoke 

Lawrence 

Lynn 

Maiden 

Newburyport 

New Bedford 

North Adams 

Salem 

Somerville 

Amounts carried forward 



$11,319 53 



47 


50 


19 


50 


117 


50 


81 


00 


79 


38 


46 


00 


34 


00 


4 00 


3 


00 



6 00 
11 50 
19 00 

2 00 
49 00 
15 00 
31 00 
45 00 

5 00 



110 


60 


264 


45 


3 


50 


8 50 


74 


40 


105 


65 


98 


05 


583 


70 


152 


58 


16 


00 


240 


85 


64 


55 


43 


30 


536 


54 


38 


05 



$2,340 72 $11,934 91 



AUDITOR S REPORT. 



101 



PAUPERS, OUT-DOOR RELIEF, GENERAL 
SUNDRIES— Continued. 



Amounts brought forward 


$2,340 


72 


$11,934 91 




27 

113 

40 

57 

207 


52 

96 
26 
45 
50 




Woburn 




Town of Andover 










60 


00 




Billerica 


46 
331 

84 


00 
69 
26 




Chelmsford 








Salisbury .... 


22 


00 




Sturbridsre 


81 
245 

80 


25 
11 
75 




O 










3,738 47 








Hospitals, etc. : 










58 


00 




Children's Home 


9 
2,625 


00 
09 




Commonwealth of Mass 






640 


72 




Hospital Cottages for Children 


339 


84 




Lowell Hospital Association. . 


327 


36 




Mass. Hospital for Dipsoman- 
iacs and Inebriates 


276 


33 




Mass. Hospital for Epileptics. 
Mass. School for the Feeble- 


1,028 


68 


, \ 




1,260 


93 




Mass. State Sanitorium 


69 


87 




Perkins Institute and Mass. 








School for the Blind 


59 


99 




St. John's Industrial School.. . 


40 


00 




St. Peter's Orphan Asylum . . . 
Ststers of Cnarity, Lawrence. . 


2,145 

8 

1,623 

510 


97 
00 
00 
30 




Sistejs of Charity, Salem 

Worcester Insane Hospital. . . , 


142 
175 


50 
52 






80 


00 


11,421 10 








Amount carried forward 


$27,094 48 



102 



AUDITOR S REPORT. 



PAUPERS, OUT-DOOR RELIEF, GENERAL 
SUNDRIES— Continued. 



Amounts brought forward 



$27,094 48 



Cash Allowances 



4,573 03 



Provisions, Fuel, etc., on orders: 

App. Lowell City Hospital and 

Almshouse, Provisions. . . 8,636 00 

App. Lowell City Hospital and 

Almshouse, Sundries 1,311 00 

Boulger Shoe Co 7 25 

J. H. Beaulieu 3 00 

E. J. Barrett 99 00 

Margaret Blackburn 33 00 

Breen Bros. 141 00 

W. II. Brown 21 00 

J. H. Burke 54 00 

Peter J. Brady 18 00 

George Campbell 9 00 

Central Cash Market 72 00 

Humphrey Coffey 105 00 

A. J . C onant 6 00 

J. H. Corbett 39 00 

C. G. Coburn 21 00 

J. A. Daly 39 00 

P. H. Daley 12 00 

D. J. Donovan 207 00 

C. F. Devno 12 00 

P. Duggan & Son 36 00 

Joseph Eno 12 00 

George Fairburn 9 00 

Family Supply Co 22 50 

H. J. Farrell 3 00 

Furlong Bros 72 00 

J. E. Freeman 174 00 

P. Gillogly 9 00 

Mrs. J. J. Gilbride 3 00 

Harry Gray 27 00 

M. W. Hale 36 00 

Harry Hanson. ...•••• 9 00 

J. S. Herrick 18 00 

Highland Grocery 6 00 

Amounts carried forward $11,281 75 



4,573 03 



$31,667 51 



auditor's report. 



103 



PAUPERS, OUT-DOOR RELIEF, GENERAL 
SUNDRIES— Continued. 



Amounts brought forward $11,281 75 $31,667 51 

F. H. Hodges 24 00 

S. P. Hebert 21 00 

Keefe Bros 129 00 

H. J. Keyes 102 00 

Abraham Langlois 3 00 

P. Lanard 3 00 

Michael Lafleur 3 00 

Lowell One Price Clothing Co. 2 38 

Thomas G. Lyons 27 00 

Anthony McCarron 3 00 

Merrimack Clothing Co 54 79 

P. Manning. 27 00 

Ed. Martin 54 00 

J. J. McCann 36 00 

F. J. McCarthy 38 50 

John McCullough 18 00 

M. McGlinchey 102 00 

T. F. McSorley 39 00 

J. H. Murray 42 00 

J. McGlinchey 63 00 

Malo Bros 3 00 

J. J. McCausland & Co 6 00 

Mrs. P. Manning 3 00 

M. Murphy 9 00 

N. E. Market 6 00 

Wm. Nelligan 99 00 

O'Donnell Bros 3 00 

O'Sullivan Bros. Co 11 75 

Pawtucketville Cash Grocery. 9 00 

C. Picard 3 00 

S. Renaud, Jr 12 00 

J. B. Richardson & Sons 51 00 

Anthony Robinson 21 00 

J. F. Saunders 54 00 

J. R. Towle 3 00 

J. J. Stack 3 00 

John J. Sullivan 12 00 

W. W. Thibodeau 3 00 

Union Market 240 00 

Amounts carried forward $12,625 17 $31,667 51 



104 



AUDITOR S REPORT. 



PAUPERS, OUT-DOOR RELIEF, GENERAL 
SUNDRIES— Continued. 



Amounts brought forward 

Walker & Thompson 

Charles E. Walsh 

Sundries : 

To Adams Hardware & Paint Co. 

American Express Co , 

Kate Bailey 

Mrs, E. M. Berry 

Belknap & Lamb 

B. R. Benner 

Boulger Shoe Co 

C. B. CoburnCo 

P. Coleman 

Daniel Danahy 

George Dion 

J. J. Donohoe 

Thomas Donohoe 

Mrs. R. A. Dunham 

Gilbride's 

Gilmore Electric Co 

Mrs. Gillick. 

H. L. Gonzales 

P. Hickey 

Mrs. M. Kenyon 

Thomas G. Little 

A. Leblanc 

Lowell Coal Co 

Lowell Electric Light Corp. . . 

Libby Printing Co 

A. W. Lewis & Co 

Mrs. James Lynch 

Joseph Mullin 

Morse Coach Co 

O'Sullivan Bros. Co ... , 

G. C. Prince & Son ..'... 

A. G. Pollard & Co 

John P. Quinn 

H. O. Robinson 

Flora Ross 

Amounts brought forward 



$12,625 


17 


$31,667 51 


63 


00 




9 


00 


12,697 17 






15 


00 
50 




13 


00 




34 


50 




12 


65 




25 


00 




2 


00 
15 




5 


50 




4 00 




2 


00 




528 


00 




6 


00 




12 00 




12 


94 




20 


00 




19 


00 




7 


65 




528 


00 




4 


07 




4 


00 




503 


15 




1,308 


36 




40 


05 




35 


00 




44 


31 




100 


00 




10 


80 




1 


50 




1 


25 




2 


00 




5 


00 




40 00 




15 


20 




3 


00 




$ 3,365 


58 


$44,364 68 



auditor's report 105 

PAUPERS, OUT-DOOR RELIEF, GENERAL 
SUNDRIES— Continued. 

Amounts brought forward $3,365 58 $44,364 68 

G. G. Read 9 00 

C. N. Rice& Co 1 00 

J. H. Sparks 2 00 

Daniel T. Sullivan 196 45 

Sunlight Shoe Store. . : 9 00 

R. L. Stevens 20 00 

F. A. M. Tobin 17 50 

E. W. Trull 137 94 

M. G. Wight & Co 7 00 

Fannie S. White 366 00 

4,131 47 

$48,496 15 



POLICE, SALARIES, POLICE BOARD AND CLERK. 

Appropriation $5,000 00 

$5,000 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

To Frank B. Dovv, Chairman 1,200 00 

Fisher H. Pearson 1,000 00 

Harry R. Rice 430 56 

Laforest Beals 569 44 

Joseph Smith, Clerk 1,800 00 

$5,000 00 

POLICE, SALARIES AND LABOR. 

Appropriation. $132,461 25 

Receipts, App. Care City Hall, 

Police Officer 1,006 50 

App. Law Salaries 1,200 01 

$134,667 76 



106 auditor's report. 

POLICE, SALARIES AMD LABOR— Continued. 

EXPENDITURES. 

To William B. Moffatt, Supt 2,000 00 

William R. Kew, Deputy Supt. 1,500 00 

Redmond Welch, Deputy Supt. 1,500 00 

Michael J. Burns, Electrician. 1,500 00 

John E. Maguire, Constable. . 906 25 

Lillie S. Cutler, Clerk 106 00 

Emma V. Vining, Clerk 468 00 

A. M. Wood 36 00 

Sundry Persons, Police Officers 123,794 96 

Sundry Persons, Pension 670 92 

1- 132,482 13 

Transferred to General Treasury 

Fund 2,185 63 



$134,66? 76 



POLICE, SUNDRIES. 

Appropriation $5,500 00 

Additional Appropriation 1,600 00 



$7,100 00 



EXPENDITURES. 



Water, Lighting and Telephone 

App. Water Works 

Lowell Electric Light Corp 

Lowell Gas Light Co 

N. E. T. & T.Co 

W. U. Tel. Co 

Hardware, etc. : 

To E. P. Flanders & Co 

H. C. Girard 

Thompson Hardware Co. . 



161 


64 


270 


63 


276 


29 


316 


13 


1 


91 


8 


40 


26 


27 


59 


32 



1,026 60 



93 99 



Amount carried forward $1,120 59 



auditor's report. 107 



POLICE, SUNDRIES— Continued. 
Amount brought forward 

Expenses of Offices : 

To John Freeman 

William B. Moffatt 



Fuel: 

To John T. Brennan 

Edward Cawley 

Lowell Coal Co 

Pipe Fittings, etc. : 

To Boutwell Bros 

W. A. Mack & Co 

Pevey Bros 

D. H. Wilson & Co.... 

Station Supplies : 

To Owen E. Brennan 

G. J. & D. Bradt 

Carleton & Hovey 

C. B. Coburn Co 

Ellingwood & Co 

Electric Gas Lighting Co 

Edes Mfg. Co 

James E. Freeman 

Daniel Gage 

Fred Howard 

C. F. Hoisington & Son. 

Keefe Bros 

R. J. Lang & Co 

Mitchell, Wing & Co... 

W. A. Maguire & Co. . . 

Charles E. Perry & Co. . 

Simpson & Rowland. . . . 

S. W. Wiggin 



Amount carried forward $2.972 99 







$1,120 59 


1 


10 




186 


89 


187 QQ 


1 


50 




620 


10 




451 


32 


1,072 92 


25 


07 


18 


00 




30 00 




4 


00 


77 07 


6 


60 


32 


40 
10 




16 


40 




9 


93 




50 


40 




185 


00 




6 


15 




54 


90 




8 


60 
50 

85 
85 




3 


75 




12 


50 




123 


30 
19 




2 ( 








514 42 







108 auditor's report. 

POLICE, SUNDRIES— Continued. 
Amounts brought forward $2,972 99 

Stationery, Printing, etc. : 

To J. Harry Boardman. 

Buckland Printing Co 

Carter's Ink Co 

Courier-Citizen Co 

Daily Mail Publishing Co 

Dumas & Co 

J. M. Fellows 

J.H. B.Fogg 

Thomas H. Lawler. 

Lepine & Co 

Lowell Sun. 

National Publishing Co 

G. C. Prince & Son 

Sampson, Murdock & Co 

Smith Premier Typewriter Co. 
The Boston Book Co 



Cloth, Buttons, Insignia, etc. : 

To Rafael Mastrangialo .... 

A. G, Pollard & Co 

Nicholas Seroghan 

Waierbury Button Co. . . , 
Wendell Fay & Co 

Furniture, Repairs, etc. : 

To Gookin Bros 

L. W. Hawkes & Co.... 
O'Donnell & Gilbride Co 

Hay, Grain, etc. : 

To J. B. Cover & Co 

Charles Dumas & Co. . . . 

W. P. Foye 

Fred A. Fox 

George M. Foster 

Joseph Mullin 

H. E. Noyes & Son 



1 


50 


4 


00 


2 


20 


222 


05 


16 


50 


32 


50 


10 00 


1 


96 


23 


30 


12 


60 


19 


50 


3 


00 


210 


78 


12 


00 


3 


50 


2 


00 


3 


00 


13 


75 


2 


12 


48 


13 


199 


87 


17 


25 


2 


50 




90 


137 


33 


2 


70 


2 


60 


105 


30 


185 


52 


GO 


75 


104 


00 



577 39 



266 87 



20 65 



Amounts carried forward $598 20 $3,837 90 



AUDITORS REPORT. 



109 



POLICE, SUNDRIES— Continued. 

Amounts brought forward $598 20 

Edward W. Trull 113 40 

O. D. Wilder 6 95 

Carriages, Harnesses and Repairing : 

To Robert Barris 25 

Donovan Harness Co 21 65 

Thomas J. Goyette 15 00 

J. H. Laporte '. . . . 24 85 

H. J. O'Dowd 3 00 

Salois & Leith 214 35 

J. H. Sparks 25 00 

Shoeing Horses: 

To M. J. Cahill 11 10 

Cahill Bros 11 70 

Owen J. Carney 26 75 

John J, Donnelly 56 50 

Laundering : 

To Lowell Laundry 5 83 

McNabb Bros 11 57 

Transportation, Carriage hire, etc. : 

To American Express Co 4 35 

B. & M. R. R 22 35 

Man. & Con. Express Co 30 

Morse Coach Co 8 00 

N. Y. B. Despatch Express Co. 1 10 

N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R.... 4 24 



Sundries • 

App. Public Buildings, Carpenters, 
Painters, etc 

David Benoit 

F. M. Bill & Co 

W. P. Brazer & Co 

M. J. Burns 

C. H. Clapp & Co 

Amounts carried forward 



10 11 



00 
00 
25 



6 20 
175 00 



$3,837 90 



718 55 



304 10 



106 05 



17 40 



40 34 



$198 56 $5,024 34 



110 



auditor's report. 



POLICE, SUNDRIES 

Amounts brought forward 

J. B. Cover & Co 

Crown Studio 

O. P. Davis 

W. E. Decrow 

Derby & Morse 

William Downs 

Foote, Pierson & Co 

J. B. Goodwin 

B. J. Gagnon 

Kelty Bros 

Keefe & Horan 

Thomas F. Lacey 

Marion 

W. M. Morrison 

R. T. Mower 

Neostyle Co 

J. J. Norton 

Redding, Baird & Co 

Seaver Radford Co 

J. H. Sparks .- 

The Okinite Co 

Talbot Dye. & Chemical Co. 

Tucke & Parker 

H. H. Whitlock 

Waverly Hotel 

C. Zimmer 

W. Zimmer 



Transferred to General Treasury 
Fund 



— Continued. 



$198 56 $5,024 34 



3 


78 




7 


90 


' 


5 


00 




49 


62 




28 


64 


> 


20 


00 




5 


00 




4 


15 




4 


00 
05 




12 


00 




20 


00 




55 


00 




3 


75 




3 


50 




5 


00 




1 


75 




11 


76 




5 


00 




8 


00 




1,417 


71 




165 


78 




9 


70 




5 


00 




21 00 




2 


05 




1 


30 


2,075 00 










7,099 34 






66 






7,100 00 



UNDERGROUND WIRES, POLICE DEPARTMENT, 



Appropriation. 



$2,000 00 



$2,000 00 



auditor's report. Ill 

UNDERGROUND WIRES, POLICE DEP'T.— Continued. 

EXPENDITURES. 

To W. E. Decrow 380 00 

H. C. Girard 11 40 

N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R.... 5 32 

N. E. T. & T. Co 673 13 

Pevey Bros 1 25 

Salois & Leith 9 50 

Welch Bros 192 21 

1,272 81 

Balance to 1905 727 19 

$2,0 00 00 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS, SALARIES. 

Appropriation $2,268 00 

$2,268 00 

"expenditures. 

To J. B. Conlon, Superintendent, 1,230 00 

John J. O'Connor, « 570 00 

Joseph F. Roarke, Clerk 468 00 

$2,268 00 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS, JANITOR AT POLICE STATION. 

Appropriation $912 50 

$912 50 

EXPENDITURES. 

App. Public Buildings, Carpenters, 

Painters, etc 145 00 

J. Donahue 767 50 

$912 50 



112 REPORT OF THE TREASURER. 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS, ASSISTANT JANITOR AT 
POLICE STATION. 

Appropriation $821 25 

$821 25 

EXPENDITURES. 

App. Public Buildings, Carpenters, 

Painters, etc 130 50 

Sundry Persons, Labor 688 47 

818 97 

Transferred to General Treasury 

Fund 2 28 

$821 25 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS, JANITOR AT MEMORIAL 

BUILDING. 

Appropriation $702 00 

$702 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

App. Public Buildings, Carpenters, 

Painters, etc 112 50 

Sundry Persons, Labor. 589 50 

$702 00 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS, CARPENTERS, 
PAINTERS, ETC. 

Appropriation $7,000 00 

Amount carried forward $7,000 00 



AUDITORS REPORT. 



113 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS, CARPENTERS, PAINTERS, 

ETC. — Continued. 

Amount brought forward $7,000 00 

Receipts, App. Schools 77 52 

App.Paupers O. D. R.Gen'l Sundries 323 10 
App. Public Buildings, Almshouse 

Repairs 10 94 

App. Public Buildings, Repairing 

Palmer St. Engine House 389 18 

App. Public Buildings, Janitor at 

Police Station 145 00 

App. Public Buildings, Assistant 

Janitor at Police Stalion 130 50 

App. Public Health, Small Pox ... 7 94 

' k « Elections... 66 02 

1 < Police Sundries 10 11 

" Public Buildings, Janitor at 

Memorial Building 112 50 

8,272 81 

EXPENDITURES. 

To Sundry Persons as per pay roll 8,239 00 

Transferred to General Treasury 

Fund 33 81 

$8,272 81 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS, BOARD OF HORSES. 

Appropriation $1,000 00 

Additional Appropriation 267 96 

$1,267 96 

EXPENDITURES. 

To Owen J. Carney 31 50 

O. P. Davis 306 42 

T. J-McDermott 198 98 

P. F. McNulty 194 31 

Amount carried forward $731 21 



114 auditor's report. 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS, BOARD OF HORSES— Continued. 

Amount brought forward $ 731 21 

Morse Coach Co 63 57 

J. H. Sparks 470 16 

1,264 94 

Transferred to General Treasury 

Fund 3 02 

$1,267 96 

m i - II II I I 1HII1 IMMMBI 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS, ELECTRIC POWERS AT SHOP. 

Appropriation $300 00 

$300 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

To Lowell Electric Light Corp. . . 254 76 

Transferred to General Treasury 

Fund 45 24 

$30 00 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS, WORK NOT DONE BY 
THE DEPARTMENT. 

Appropriation. . $5,000 00 

Additional Appropriation ■. . -. 87 16 

$5,087 16 

EXPENDITURES. 

Hardware : 

To H. C. Girard ,,.. 9 98 

Amount carried forward $9 98 



AUDITOR S REPORT 



115 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS, WORK NOT DONE BY THE 
DEPARTMENT— Continued. 

Amount brought forward. ....... $ 9 98 

Carriagas, Harnesses, Repairs : 

To E. P. Bryant 60 

A. L. Butman 2 50 

Donovan Harness Co 255 35 

F. B. Hill & Co 91 30 

P. A. MacKenzie 2 60 

Sawyer Carriage Co 133 90 

J. H. Sparks 3 20 

J. H. Swett 10 00 



Shoeing Horses : 

To H. Baron & Co 

James Blakely 

Owen J. Carney 

A. D. Mitten 

Henry Reynolds 

Mason Work, Plastering, Roofing, 
etc. : 

To J. W. Bennett & Co 

James Burns & Son 

Matthias F. Connor 

B. F. Crosby & Co 

P. Conlon. 

C.F. George & Co 

P. H. Meehan & Co . 

D. M. Prescott 

Samuel E. Snow 

Walsh & Co 

James Walwood 



Plumbing, Pipe Fittings, etc. : 
To H. R. Barker Mfg. Co 

John H. Barry 

Carroll Bros 

E. J. Carroll & Co. ... 

T. Costello & Co 

Daniel Cushing & Co .... 6 60 590 68 



2 


75 


3 


65 


224 


50 


21 


95 


12 


50 


62 


45 


10 


50 


156 


77 


119 


43 


98 


14 


22 


05 


175 


50 


28 


99 


4 


89 


37 


95 


15 


00 


267 


14 


102 


07 


92 


08 


38 


64 


84 


15 


6 


60 



499 45 



265 35 



731 67 



Amounts carried forward $590 68 $1,506 45 



116 auditor's report. 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS, WORK NOT DONE BY THE 
DEPARTMENT— Continued. 

Amounts brought forward $590 68 $1,506 45 

P. J. Custy &Co,... 

James D. Danahy 

Harry S. Drury ............ 

E. F. Farrell 

Farrell & Conaton 

H. J. Fitzpatrick 

Fitzpatrick & Welch 

Charles E. Gee 

George P. Green 

George Hanaford & Co 

D. J. Leary 

W. A. Mack& Co 

Edward Meloy 

William H. McElholm 

Scannell Boiler Works 

Welch Bros 

H. H. Wilder & Co 



Sundries : 

To American Express Co 

H. Baron & Co. 

J. E. Conant & Co 

Martin Carey 

James B. Conlon 

O. P. Davis 

Derby & Morse 

W. A. Eaton 

Eagle Electric Co 

Gookin Bros 

Arthur L. Knapp 

A. W. Lewis & Co 

Meserve's L. & B. Express Co. 

Enoch Mills 

T. J. McDermott 

McNabb Bros 

N. E. T. & T. Co 

N E. Electric & Supply Corp. 
Pratt & Forrest 



19 


15 


75 


57 


184 


32 


118 


17 


116 


17 


133 


43 


417 


61 


2 


80 


292 


00 


43 


10 


285 


79 


122 


30 


70 


15 


22 


35 


7 


40 


457 


40 


18 


38 




65 


8 


75 


6 


00 


2 


50 


5 


00 


21 


43 


2 


80 


45 


50 


147 


71 


7 


50 


5 


35 


58 20 




25 


36 


00 


56 


80 


] 


50 


1 


48 


2 07 


2 


80 



2,976 77 



Amounts carried forward $412 29 $4,483 22 



auditor's report. 117 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS, WORK NOT DONE BY THE 
DEARTMENT— Continued. 

Amounts brought forward $ 412 29 $4,483 22 

Amasa Pratt & Co 

Rice & Co 

W. A. Sherman 

J. H. Sparks 

Tucke & Parker. . . '. 



109 20 




5 50 




5 00 




57 60 




14 35 






603 94 

$5,087 16 


— 





PUBLIC BUILDINGS, BILLS FOR MATERIALS. 

Appropriation $400 00 

Receipts, App. Paupers O. D. R. 

General Sundries 47 50 

App. Rifle Range Improvement at 

Range 2 10 



$4,049 60 



EXPENDITURES. 

Painters and Electricians Supplies : 

To Adams Hardware & Paint Co. 62 87 

Sylvester Bean 472 90 

C. B. Coburn Co 348 31 

P. Dempsey & Co 116 41 

A. L. Kittredge & Co 145 71 



1,146 20 



Hardware, etc. : 

To Adams Hardware & Paint Co. 32 90 

H. R. Barker Mfg. Co 9 00 

W. T. S. Bartlett 14 15 

Owen E. Brennan 39 70 

F. W. Cheney & Co 2 75 

E. P. Flanders & Co 42 00 



Amounts carried forward $140 50 $1,146 20 



118 



AUDITOR S REPORT. 



PUBLIC BLD'G'S, BILLS FOR MATERIALS— Continued. 



Amounts brought forward 



$140 50 $1,146 20 



Henry C. Girard 

N. D. Lafleur 

W, A. Mack & Co 

Peter H. Savage 

Thompson Hardware Co. 
William Zimmer 

Stationery, Postage, Printing, etc. : 
To Buckland Printing Co 

Butterfield Printing Co 

T. H. Lawler. . . , 

G. C. Prince & Son 

Joseph F. Roarke 

Sampson, Murdock & Co 

Lumber : 

To Burnham & Davis 

Burnham & Davis Lumber Co. 

Pratt & Forrest 

Amasa Pratt & Co 

William H, Wiggin 

Sundries : 

App. Water Works 

American Express Co 

Art Metal Construction Co ... . 

B. & M. R. R 

Owen J. Carney 

Edward Cawley 

John J. Doherty & Co 

Donovan Harness Co 

Farrell & Conaton 

Fitzpatrick & Welch 

Gilbride's 

Kelty Bros. 

C. F. Keyes ..,-.; 

Middlesex Machine Co 

N. E. T. & T. Co 

Henry J. O'Dowd 

Amounts carried forward 



7 84 

90 

10 05 

42 25 

74 58 
25 



42 


35 


9 00 


7 


60 


28 


00 


1 


00 


3 00 


275 


00 


90 


96 


27 


37 


198 


72 


880 


78 


26 


10 




25 


165 


00 


40 


90 


330 00 


93 


87 


1 


96 


101 


00 


3 00 


64 


00 


14 


25 


2 


62 


88 


00 


1 


40 




20 


50 


00 



276 37 



90 95 



1,472 83 



$982 55 $2,986 35 



auditor's report. 

PUBLIC BLD'G'S, BILLS FOR MATERIALS— Continued. 

Amount brought forward ■ • ■ $982 55 $2,980 35 

A. G. Pollard & Co.... 11 82 

J. H. Sparks 27 00 

Daniel T. Sullivan 12 90 

Talbot Dye. & Chemical Co . . 90 

Waverly Hotel 21 00 

Henry F. Whiting 100 

— — . 1,057 17 

:4,043 52 
Transferred to General Treasury . . . 

Fund 6 08 

$4,049 60 



REPAIRING PALMER ST. ENGINE HOUSE. 

Appropriation $1,500 00 

$1,500 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

Labor : 

To Sundry Persons as per pay roll 346 01 

App. Public Buildings, Carpenters, 

Painters, etc 263 22 

- — 609 23 

Painters Supplies : 

App. Public Buildings, Carpenters, 

Painters, etc 125 96 

Adams Hardware & Paint Co. 38 48 

Sylvester Bean ... 234 02 

— 398 46 

Lumber: 

To Amasa Pratt Co 156 29 

156 29 

Amount carried forward $1,164 98 



120 auditor's report. 

REPAIRING PALMER ST. ENGINE HOUSE— Continued. 

Amount brought forward ,. $1,164 98 

Pipe Fittings, Plumbings, etc. : 

To W. A. Mack & Co 109 90 

Welch Bros 1 70 

111 60 

Mason Work and Material : 

To P. Conlon 3 40 

B. F. Crosby & Co 177 20 

180 60 

Sundries : 

To H. C. McOsker 43 82 

43 82 

$1,500 00 
NEW BOILER AT BRANCH ST. ENGINE HOUSE. 

Appropriation. $500 00 

$500 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

To Sundry Persons for Labor. ... 53 72 

E.JJ. Carroll &*Co 29 00 

P. Conlon 69 90 

Fitzpatrick & Welch 347 36 

499 98 

Transferred to General Treasury 

Fund ! 02 

$500 00 

PAINTING CITY HALL, INTERIOR AND 
EXTERIOR. 

Appropriation $500 00 

$500 00 



AUDITOR S REPORT. 



121 



PAINTING CITY HALL, INTERIOR AND 
EXTERIOR— Continued. 

EXPENDITURES. 

To Sundry Persons for Labor 229 67 

App. School Houses, Work and 

Material 10 33 

Adams Hardware & Paint Co. 36 60 

Walter Coburn & Co 45 

Larsen & Bentley 1 50 

278 55 

Transferred to General Treasury 

Fund 221 45 

$500 00 

RESETTING AND REPAIRING BOILER AT 
CITY HALL. 

Appropriation $1,500 00 

$1,500 00 

EXPENDITURES, 

To Sundry Persons, for Labor 192 87 

H. R. Barker Mfg. Co 355 31 

P. Conlon 821 20 

D. J. Leary 24 00 

Scannell Boiler Works 106 60 

1,499 98 

Transferred to General Treasury 

Fund 02 

$1,500 00 

ALMSHOUSE REPAIRS. 

Appropriation $2,500 00 

$2,500 00 



122 auditor's report. 

ALMSHOUSE, REPAIRS— Continued. 

EXPENDITURES. 

Labor : 

To Sundry Persons as per pay roll. 186 68 

Lumber : 

App. Public Buildings, Carpenters, 

etc 10 94 

App. School Houses, Work and 

Material 11 25 

Wm. H. Wiggin 108 99 

Mason Work and Material : 

To P. Conlon 63 68 

Union Paving Co 204 75 

Hardware, Pipe Fittings, etc. : 

To John H.Barry 185 01 

Harry S. Drury 181 72 

James D. Danahy 48 23 

Fitzpatrick & Welch 345 90 

George P. Green 154 09 

Thompson Hardware Co 5 40 

Welch Bros 238 08 

Sundries : 

To A. W. Lewis & Co 716 73 

H. C. McOsker 38 36 



186 68 



131 18 



268 43 



1.158 43 



755 09 



2,499 81 
Transferred to General Treasury 

Fund 19 

$2,500 00 



auditor's report. 123 

BATH ROOMS AT FLETCHER AND BRANCH ST. 

ENGINE HOUSE. 

Appropriation $800 00 

Additional Appropriation 85 

$800 85 



EXPENDITURES. 

To Sundry Persons as per pay roll 180 25 

E. J. Carroll & Co 298 00 

Harry S. Drury 296 00 

Pratt & Forrest 18 00 

W. H. Wiggin 8 60 



$800 85 



BATH ROOM, CLOSETS AND NEW FLOOR AT 
FOURTH ST. ENGINE HOUSE. 



Appropriation $600 00 



$600 00 



EXPENDITURES. 

To Sundry Persons for Labor 278 97 

Adams Hardware & Paint Co. 11 90 

Davis & Sargent Lumber Co. . 19 40 

George P. Green 272 95 

W. A, Mack & Co 6 19 

Amasa Pratt & Co 10 43 



599 84 

Transferred to General Treasury 

Fund 16 

$600 00 



124 



AUDITOR S REPORT. 



SCHOOLS. 

Appropriation $280,000 00 

Additional Appropriation 19,519 19 

Receipts, overdrafts, Elizabeth B. 

Daum 10 00 

F. M. Lancey 3 60 



$299,532 79 



EXPENDITURES. 



To A. K. Whitcomb, Supt 

Assistants in Supt.'s Office . . 
Truant Officers 

Teachers : 

In High School • • • • 

Grammar Schools 

Primary Schools 

Training School 

Kindergartin 

Drawing 

Music 

Sewing 

Books : 

To American Book Co 

American Library Co 

Allyn & Bacon 

D. Appleton & Co 

Atkinson & Mentzer 

Edward E. Babb & Co 

C. C. Birchard& Co 

T. H. Castor & Co 

Century Co 

Commercial Text Book Co» . . 
Ginn & Co .... 

D. C. Heath & Co .' 

Henry Holt & Co 

Houghton, Mifflin & Co 

Harvard University 

Amounts carried forward 



3,000 00 








3,000 00 


1,159 


00 


1,159 00 


4,100 


00 






4,100 00 






34,883 


35 




82,619 


26 




71,248 


47 




11,451 


81 




12,473 


50 




1,350 00 




1,944 


00 




791 


00 


216,761 39 






1,227 


91 




15 


00 




35 


75 




6 


42 




3 


00 




3,139 


66 




16 


80 




8 


00 




1 


10 




1 


70 




2,293 


63 




430 


78 




69 


67 




53 


98 




7 


50 





$7,310 90 $,225,020 39 



AUDITOR S REPORT, 



125 



SCHOOLS— Continued. 



Amounts brought forward 

J. B. Lippincott Co 

Little, Brown & Co 

Maynard, Merrill & Co 

Munn & Co 

W. L. Musick Publishing Co. 

Macey- Wernicke Co. 

W. L, Mason 

Isaac Pitman & Sons 

Powers & Lyons 

Practical Text Book Co 

Rand, McNally & Co 

F. E. Reed Co 

Richardson, Smith & Co 

Scientific American Club 

Charles Scribners Sons. 

Silver, Burdett & Co 

Snow & Farnham 

Christopher Sower Co 

Scott, Foresman & Co 

Thompson, Brown & Co 

University Publishing Co 

University of Chicago Press . . . 
Edgar Werner Publishing and 

Supply Co 

Whitcomb & Barrows 

John Wylie & Sons 

Blank Books, Stationery, Printings, 

etc. : 
To Adams, dishing & Foster. . . . 

Army and Navy Journal 

Baker Printing Co .... 

Buckland Printing .... - 

Butterfield Printing Co 

Cabinet Letter Press Co 

Courier-Citizen Co 

A. B. Dick & Co 

Dumas & Co 

Daily Mail Publishing Co 

j. F. Fellows 

Amounts carried forward 



$7,310 90 $225,020 39 



302 


00 




8 


00 




183 


55 




7 


00 
90 
42 

60 

68 


• 


1 


58 




37 


20 




11 


20 




226 


80 




342 


58 




76 


00 
92 




221 


55 




82 


80 




22 


00 




90 00 




175 


00 




18 


00 




1 


62 

60 




1 


20 




1 


12 


9,124 22 


17 


50 


20 


50 




16 


00 




21 


50 




428 


00 




6 


00 




368 


55 




43 


45 




265 


80 




6 


95 




1 


25 





$1,195 50 $234,144 61 



126 



auditor's report. 



SCHOOLS— Continued. 



Amounts brought forward 

F. J. Flemings 

J. L. Hammett Co 

C. Howard Hunt Pen Co 

Holden Patent Book Cover Co. 

Harry Kittredge 

Library Bureau 

Thomas H. Lawler 

Libby Printing Co 

Osmond Long 

Lowell Sun 

Lawler Printing Co 

Lowell Bill Posting Co 

Milton Bradley Co 

Frederick Post Co 

G. C. Prince & Son 

M. C. Olson Mfg. Co 

C. E. Robinson 

Remington Typewriter Co. . . . 

Sampson, Murdock & Co 

Sunday Telegram 

F. A. M. Tobin 

Union Printing Co 

Underwood Typewriter Co. . . 

M. G. Wight & Co 

Zopher Co 

Hardwure etc. : 

To Adams Hardware & Paint Co. 

W. T. S. Bartlett 

J. C. Bennett 

Boutwell Bros 

John Callaghan 

H. E. Carlisle 

F. W. Cheney & Co \ 

E. P. Flanders & Co 

H. C. Girard 

C. F. Hosington. . . '. 

W. A. Ingham Co 

N. D. Lafluer 

W. A. Mack & Co 

H. B. Shattuck & Son 

Amounts carried forward 



$1,195 50 


$234,144 61 


173 63 




129 65 




16 25 




128 43 




21 10 




4 00 




1,315 26 




36 60 




148 70 




3 50 




48 00 




12 00 




355 06 




9 72 




1,891 86 




7 68 


* 


10 00 




50 




9 00 




1 88 




84 00 




7 95 




5 00 


/ 


190 81 




18 00 






5 824 08 


72 50 




46 18 




22 74 




7 63 




27 83 




13 60 . 




67 50 




3 98 




71 92 




12 80 




25 00 




11 20 




6 95 




25 





$390 08 $239,968 69 



AUDITOR S REPORT. 



127 



SCHOOLS— Continued. 



Amounts brought forward 

Smith & Lawrence ... 

Thompson Hardware Co .... 

Lumber : 

To Pratt & Forrest 

Wm. H. Wihgin 

Repairing Electrical Appaiatus : 
To Derby & Morse 

Eagle Electric Co 

Harry F. Harding 

N. E. Electric & Supply Corp 

Tucke A Parker 

Pipe, Fittings etc. : 

To H. R. Barker Mf'g Co 

W. W. Carey..., 

Carroll Bros .... 

Charles E. Gee 

George P. Green 

W. H. Hope & Co 

Lowell Machine Shop 

H. F. Otash 

Pevey Bros ..... ... 

A. L. Ready & Son 

Washburn Shops of the Wor- 
cester Polytechnic Institute 

Welch Bros 

D. E. Whiton Machine Co . . . 

C. Zimmer 

W. Zimmer 

Painters Supplies : 

To Adams Hardware & Paint Co. 

C. B. Coburn Co 

Heaney Mfg. Co 

A. L. Kittredge & Co 

W. W. Morrison 

W. H. Spaulding & Co 

Amount carried forward 



$390 08 $239,968 69 



4 28 




93 99 






488 35 


13 29 


17 35 






30 fi4 


13 60 




84 30 




73 70 




44 28 




518 88 






734 76 


75 


2 40 




12 30 




1 00 




6 35 




2 50 




7 75 




7 14 




4 05 




38 40 




12 93 




14 75 




7 00 




4 10 




15 00 






136 42 


96 48 




253 31 




1 00 




280 34 




1 25 




6 00 


638 38 




$241,997 24 



128 



AUDITOR S REPORT. 



' SCHOOLS— Continued. 
Amount brought forward 

Laboratory Supplies : 

To Bausch & Lomb Optical Co. 

Walter Coburn & Co . 

Carleton & Hovey 

P. Dempsey & Co 

Eimer & Amend 

L. E. Knott Apparatus Co. . . 

Mitchell, Wing & Co 

Geo. Richard & Sons 

Simpson & Rowland 

Sulpho Napthol Co 

Talbot Dye. & Chemical Co.. 



Furniture, Cloth, etc. : 

To Adams & Co. . 

Amberg File and Index Co. . . 

Bon Marche 

P. J. Custy & Co 

Gookin Bros 

Gilbride's 

J. S. Hastings 

J. T. Henry & Co 

A. L. Kittredge & Co 

H. C. McOsker 

O'Donnell & Gilbride Co 

O'Donnell Dry Goods Co 

A. E. O'Heir 

A. A. Parent 

A. G. Pollard & Co 

J. E. Post 

Robertson & Co 

J. E. Shanley & Co 

Music : 

To Hibbard's Orchestra 

Blanche B Hunking 

J. H. Jeannotte 

Middlesex Orchestra 

Amounts carried forward $126 00 $242,862 11 





$241,997 24 


54 70 




10 56 




1 75 




2 75 




24 01 




85 89 




26 46 




8 00 




49 95 




75 00 




16 57 






355 64 


45 50 




2 70 




11 00 




31 50 




64 50 




20 50 




3 13 




7 50 




24 49 




60 00 




43 20 




4 34 




17 00 




2 25 




111 10 




5 70 




8 50 




46 32 






509 23 


19 00 




20 00 




60 00 




27 00 





AUDITORS REPORT. 



129 



SCHOOLS— Continued. 

Amounts brought forward $126 00 $242,862 11 

National Band 75 00 

W. A. Owen 12 50 

Sophie M.White 18 75 



Musical Supplies : 

To Irvin A. Foote 135 00 

Peter Gallagher 18 50 

Ring Music Co 32 00 

M. Steinert & Sons Co 11 82 

Repairing Carriages and Harnesses : 

To F. B. Hill & Co 51 65 

Sawyer Carriage Co 102 46 

J. H. Sparks 8 30 

Shoeing Horses and Board of 

Horses : 

To J. J. Donnelly 53 25 

J. H. Sparks 524 93 

Fuel: 

To John Brady 215 00 

John T. Brennan 274 00 

Edward Cawley 7,068 65 

Lowell Coal Co 12,572 04 

Joseph Mullen 71 10 

Frank Reilly 300 25 

D. T. Sullivan 7 00 

Lighting and Power: 

Lowell Electric Light Corp. .. 1,745 06 

Lowell Gas Light Co 588 52 



Telephone : 

To N.E.T.&T.Co 21 26 

W. U. Telegraph Co 2 38 



232 25 



197 32 



162 41 



578 18 



20,508 04 



2,333 58 



23 64 



Amount carried forward $266,897 53 



130 auditor's report. 

SCHOOLS— Continued. 
Amount brought forward $266,897 53 



Water : 

App. Water Works 1,195 11 

Transportation, Carriage hire, etc. : 

To American Express Co 

B. & M. R. R 

B. &N. St. Ry 

Conway Transfer Co 

Hill Transfer Co 

Man. & Con. Express Co 

N. Y. & B. Des. Express Co.. 
J. H. Sparks 

Sundries : 

App. Public Buildings, Carpenters, 

Painters, etc 

App. Public Buildings, Labor 

App. School Houses, Labor 

App. School Houses, Work and 

Material 

App. School Houses, Sundries.... 
W. P. Brazer & Co 

A. D. Brigham 

Patrick Brady 

F. M. Bill & Co 

B. W. Carey 

Charles F. Carr 

Clinton Mfg. Co 

Centralville Millinery Store. . . 

Carter, Rice & Co 

John J. Cluin 

John P. Curley 

P. P. Caproni & Bro 

E. S. Colton 

John Cross 

Catherine H. Coggeshall 

Dodge & Co 

Joseph A. Davis 

Mary Delaney 

James E. Donnelly 



28 


46 


12 


89 


175 


00 


14 44 


70 


25 


25 


05 


9 


90 


7 


90 


45 


85 


31 


67 


834 


35 


801 


64 


87 


88 


5 


00 


11 


25 


4 


50 


1 


75 


50 


00 


2 


50 


59 


48 


25 


00 


27 


75 


99 


50 




40 


10 


00 


52 


75 


46 


75 


12 


00 


3 


75 


5 


00 


2 


00 


9 


15 



1,195 11 



343 89 



Amounts carried forward $2,229 92 $,268,436 53 



AUDITORS REPORT. 



131 



SCHOOLS— Continued. 



Amounts brought forward 

Michael Finnegan 

, W. H. P. Faunce 

Gilmore Mfg. Co 

H. L. Gonzales 

George H. Gage. 

A.P.Goodhue 

R. A. Griffiths 

Grant Jewelry Co . . . . . 

Percey D. Gibson 

Miss Hard's School 

C. F. Hatch Co 

E. M. Hunt 

George E. Hutchins 

E. F. Hathaway 

Thomas Hannafin 

C. H. Hanson & Co 

C. I. Hood & Co 

Keuffel & Essex Co 

A. L. Kittredge & Co 

Kelty Bros 

D. P. Knowlton. . 

M. Lahue & Co 

Florence M. Lancey 

Lowell Wall Paper Co 

Lowell Rubber Co 

Carolyn H. Locke 

D. Lovejoy & Son .... 

Merrimack Mfg. Co. 

McKissock Steam Carpet Clean- 
ing Works 

John Mack 

George F. Maguire 

Clarence Mahoney 

Murphy, Leavans & Co 

Middlesex Women's Club 

Middlesex County Truant 

School 

Middlesex North Agricultural 

Society 

R. T. Mower 

Amounts carried forward 



29 92 


$2G8,43G 53 


1 25 




75 00 




10 14 




2 00 




21 75 




15 00 




1 00 




18 00 




10 50 





1 70 
20 90 

5 80 
19 73 



1 


25 


1 


50 


177 


20 


16 


20 


19 


20 


4 


87 




95 


2 


50 


2 


23 


7 20 


64 


60 




61 




52 


1 


00 


100 


00 


1 


70 


30 


00 


4 


00 


23 


90 


55 


80 


25 


00 


2,794 


62 


15 


00 


6 


00 


$5,808 


54 $268,436 53 



132 



AUDITOR S REPORT. 



SCHOOLS— Continued. 



Amounts brought forward 

McNabb Bros 

Wm. McElwain 

H. C. McOsker 

A. C. McClurg Co 

Oliver Typewriter Co ........ 

Rowena Palmer 

Horace Partridge & Co 

Myron C. Pease 

Isaac Petinger & Sons 

Pittsburgh Plate Glass Co. . . . 

Powers & Lyons 

William Read & Sons 

Harry Raynes 

John Scott 

D. T. Sullivan 

J. A. Shanley 

James Stanley 

Standard Electric Time Co.. . 
Smith Premier Typewriter Co 

Smith & Lawrence 

Simpson & Rowland 

F. R. Strout 

George F. Sturtevant 

Taylor Roofing Co 

A. S. Thompson 

Underwood Typewriter Co . . 

Mrs. N. L. Wheeler 

W. R. Waterman 

A. C. Wheelock 

M. F. Wood 

Whittet & Co 

A. K. Whitcomb 

H. F. Whiting 

A. E. Winship 

C. Zimrher 

W. Zimmer 

Amount carried forward 



$5;808 54 $268,430 53 

3 32 

72 43 

103 68 

85 

120 00 

25 00 

6 00 

161 20 

98 

2 12 
70 

6 25 

1 50 

3 75 

21 00 

22 95 
19 25 

6 05 
15 53 

2 80 
28 00 

1 50 

35 75 

15 00 

175 00 

1 68 
44 75 

7 00 
216 00 

1 35 

5 00 

65 40 

23 80 
75 00 

7 80 
60 85 
7,048 98 



$275,485 51 



AUDITOR S REPORT. 



133 



SCHOOLS— Continued. 



Evening Schools : 

To Sundry Persons for Services as 

Sundry Persons for Services as 
Janitors 


15,808 
1,911 


00 

75 


$275,485 

■ 

17,719 

660 
1,215 

156 


51 




75 


Books, Stationery, etc. : 

Edward E. Babb & Co 

Baker Printing Co 


11 52 
135 00 

4 75 
45 00 

5 50 
67 50 
25 00 
25 25 

248 34 

3 05 

42 00 

13 75 

13 00 

12 00 
8 80 


Butterfield Printing Co f . . 




D. C. Heath & Co 








Thomas H. Lawler 

G. C. Prince & Son 




F. A. M. Tobin 


AG 


Lighting : 

To Lowell Electric Light Corp. . . 
Lowell Gas Lisdit Co 


422 
792 


66 
54 




o 


20 


Sundries : 

To Adams Hardware & Paint Co. 
John Brady 


49 
6 

10 
3 
9 

25 

27 
1 
6 

15 
1 
3 


30 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
10 
34 
75 
50 
00 


Paul R. Burtt 

P. J. Custy &Co 

Hibbard's Orchestra 

N. D. Lafleur 




Amasa Pratt & Co 




Thompson Hardware Co 


99 








$295,237 


91 



134 auditor's report. 

SCHOOLS— Continued. 

Amount brought forward $295,237 91 

Drawing Schools : 

To Sundry Persons for Services as 

Teachers 3,998 50 



Paints, Plaster, Oil, etc. : 

To Adams Hardware & Paint Co. 10 92 

P. P. Caproni & Bro 16 70 

Edward Cawley 3 00 

Lighting : 

To Lowell Electric Light Corp. ... 235 86 

Electric Supplies: 

To Tucke & Parker 2 62 



3,998 50 



30 62 

235 86 

2 62 



Sundries : 

To F. W. Farnham 4 00 

Gilbride's 4 50 

Libby Printing Co 3 25 

George F. Sturtevant 1 38 

Tucke & Parker 14 15 27 28 



$299,532 79 



SCHOOL HOUSES, LABOR. 

Appropriation $10,500 00 

Receipts, App. Schools , 834 35 

c ' Rifle Range Repairs 4 66 

" Health Office 11 51 

" Paupers, O. D. R. 

General Sundries 86 50 

" Inspector of Wires . . 183 42 



EXPENDITURES, 

To Sundry Persons for Labor. . . . 11,580 19 

Transferred to General Treasury 

Fund 40 25 



$11,620 44 



$11,620 44 



auditor's report. 135 



SCHOOL HOUSES, JANITORS. 



Appropriation $36,313 33 

Additional Appropriation 4,296 78 



$40,610 11 



EXPENDITURES. 



To Sundry Persons for Services as 

Janitors 40 606 73 

Transferred to General Treasury 

Fund 3 38 

$40,610 11 



SCHOOL HOUSES, WORK NOT DONE BY DEPART- 
MENT AND BILLS FOR MATERIALS. 

Appropriation $9,000 00 

Additional Appropriation ^. 1,471 01 

Receipts, App. Public Buildings, 

Almshouse Repairs 11 25 

App. Public Buildings, Paint- 
ing City Hall 10 33 

App. Schools 889 52 

App. Rifle Range, Improve- 
ments 39 33 

App. O. D. R. General Sun- 
dries 79 38 

App. Assessors 61 

App. Heating, Sundries 41 38 

App. Sanitary Improvements 

in Sundry School Houses 13 76 
App. Four-room Building to 

Relieve Highland School. 33 45 

$1], 590 02 



136 



auditor's report. 



SCHOOL HOUSES, WORK NOT DONE BY DEPART- 
MENT AND BILLS FOR MATERIALS— Continued. 



EXPENDITURES 

Paints, Oils, etc. : 

To Adams Hardware & Paint Co. 

Sylvester Bean 

C. B. Cobuni Co 

F. H. Griffin & Co 

Smith & Lawrence 

Mason Work and Material, Roofing, 

etc. : 
To J. W. Bennett Co 

James Burns & Son 

P. Conlon 

Matthias F. Conntfr 

B. F. Crosby & Co 

II. P. Doherty 

W. H. Fuller 

C. F, George & Co 

Isaac Jalbert 

P. H. Meehan & Co 

P. O'Hearn 

John A. Simpson 

Staples Bros. Co 

Samuel E. Snow 

Plumbing, Pipe Fittings, etc. : 

To H. R. Barker Mf'g Co 

John H. Barry 

Carroll Bros 

E. J. Carroll & Co 

Central Plumbing Co 

T. Costello & Co 

James D. Danahy 

E. W. Devaney 

Harry S. Drury 

E. W. Farrell 

Farrell & Conaton 

H. J. Fitzpatrick 

Fitzpatrick & Welch 

Amounts carried forward 



180 


75 


45 


05 


133 


53 


50 00 


49 


32 


31 


58 


38 


04 


389 


37 


302 


50 


855 


05 


819 


92 


38 


00 


65 


89 


83 


91 


775 


40 


36 


19 


10 


00 


258 


52 


34 


40 


122 


10 


137 


85 


119 


13 


35 


35 


30 


47 


875 


05 


142 


34 


42 


60 


381 


76 


66 


04 


22 


02 


311 


68 


725 


37 


$3,011 


76 



$464 65 



3,738 77 



$4,203 42 



auditor's report. 137 

SCHOOL HOUSES, WORK NOT DONE BY DEPART- 
MENT AND BILLS FOR MATERIALS— Continued. 

Amounts brought forward $3,011 76 $4,203 42 

George P. Green 

George Hanaford & Co 

Joseph Harvey 

Higgins & Kerwin 

Arthur P. Knapp. 

W. A. Mack & Co 

William H. McElholm , 

Edward Meloy 

W. McLarney & Co 

A. Parsons 

Scannell Boiler Works 

Scott & O'Day 

Matthew T. Ward 

Welch Bros 

H. H. Wilder & Co 

Electrical Supplies : 

To Derby & Morse 

Eagle Electric Co 

A. W. Lewis & Co 

Hardware : 

To Adams Hardware & Paint Co. 

J. C. Bennett 

W.T. S. Bartlett 

E. P. Flanders & Co 

H. C. Girard 

Thompson Hardware Co 

Lumber : 

To Burnham & Davis Lumber Co. 

Willis H. Bean 

Amasa Pratt & Co 

Pratt & Forrest 

William H. Wiggin 

Amount carried forward 



96 


24 




52 


07 




120 


41 




9 


40 




7 


87 




79 


49 




11 


70 




11 


24 




23 


07 


i 


4 


50 




346 


26 




6 


30 




1 


30 


* 


1,547 


97 




10 50 








5,340 08 






52 


91 




489 


72 




386 


34 


928 97 


50 


26 


13 


92 




11 


65 




64 


16 




10 


35 




41 


57 


191 91 


85 


92 


10 00 




311 


54 




58 


59 




34 50 








500 55 








$11,164 93 



138 auditor's report. 

SCHOOL HOUSE, SUNDRIES. 
Amount brought forward $11,164 93 

Sundries : 

App. Water Works 11 28 

American Mason Safety Tread 

Co 

B. & M. R. R .... 

Frank C. Breen 

Chandler Adjustable Chair and 

Desk Works 

P. Dempsey & Co 

Thomas H. Elliot 

Henry Esmond 

Harry Prescott Graves 

Gilbride's. 

F. B. Hill & Co 

Edward Judge 

Isaac Jalbert 

Kelty Bros 

James Murkland & Son 

N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R.... 

Simpson & Rowland 

George H. Staples 

Henry F. Whiting 



58 00 




20 00 




75 




10 50 




119 65 




50 00 




1 25 




15 00 




13 20 




2 50 




5 00 




22 94 




30 




75 




25 




5 75 




80 35 




7 62 






425 09 






$11,590 02 



NEW CHIMNEY AT HIGHLAND SCHOOL. 







$125 00 






EXPENDITURES. 




$125 00 








To P. Conlon 


93 50 
31 50 




P. O'Hearn 










$125 00 









auditor's report. 139 

SCHOOLS— Continued. 

CONCRETE CHAPEL, CHEEVER AND COTTAGE ST. 

SCHOOL BASEMENT. 

Appropriation * $200 00 

$200 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

To Sundry Persons for Labor. ... 30 00 

P. Conlon 170 00 

$200 00 

NEW BOILER KT LYON ST. SCHOOL. 

Appropriation $500 00 

$500 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

To Sundry Persons for Labor. ... 2 84 

P. Conlon 64 50 

Fitzpatrick & Welch 432 66 

500 00 

NEW BOILER AT TRAINING SCHOOL. 

Appropriation $500 00 

$500 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

To Sundry Persons for Labor. ... 16 25 

P. Conlon 118 00 

Scannell Boiler Works 295 00 

James Walsh 3 03 

Amount carried forward $432 28 



140 auditor's report. 

NEW BOILER AT TRAINING SCHOOL— Continued. 

Amount brought forward $ 432 28 

Welch Bros 57 30 

H. H. Wilder & Co 10 39 

499 97 

Transferred to General Treasury 

Fund . 03 

$500 00 



REPAIRING FULLER & WARREN FURNACES IN 
VARIOUS SCHOOLS. 

Appropriation $1,000 00 

$1,000 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

To American Express Co 60 

B. & M. R. R 15 68 

Daniel Cushing & Co 33 93 

Fuller & Warren Co 871 89 

C. F. Hoisington & Son 5 50 

W. A. Mack & Co 24 42 

Staples Bros. Co 28 50 

980 52 

Transferred to General Treasury 

Fund 19 48 

$1,000 00 

IMPROVING SANITARY CONDITIONS AT 
COLBURN SCHOOL. 

Appropriation $2,000 00 

$2,000 00 



auditor's report. 141 

IMPROVING SANITARY CONDITIONS AT 
COLBURN SCAOOL— Continued. 

EXPENDITURES. 

To Sundry Persons as per pay roll 304 47 

H. R. Barker Mfg. Co 2 00 

Courier-Citizen Co 3 50 

Harry Prescott Graves 25 00 

Isaac Jalbert 12G 77 

Arthur P. Knapp 2 50 

Lowell Sun 4 00 

Amasa Pratt & Co 98 83 

Scott & O'Day . 1,432 75 

1,999 82 

Transferred to General Treasury 

Fund 18 



$2,000 00 



NEW BUILDING TO RELIEVE HIGHLAND SCHOOL. 
Appropriation $2,700 00 



$2,700 00 



EXPENDITURES. 

To Sundry Persons as per pay roll 931 05 

App.' School Houses, Work 

and Material 

Adams Hardware & Paint Co. 

Sylvester Bean 

E. J. Carroll & Co 

J. L. Douglass & Co 

- E. P. Flanders & Co 

Harry Prescott Graves 

W. A. Mack& Co 

Pratt & Forest 

D. T. Sullivan 

Smith & Lawrence 

Amount carried forward 



33 


45 


66 


81 


78 


75 


38 


72 


101 


74 


2 


20 


45 


00 


240 


00 


716 


87 


3 


60 


5 


00 


$ 2,263 19 



142 auditor's report. 



\ 



NEW BUILDING TO RELIEVE HIGHLAND 
SCHOOL— Continudd. 

Amount brought forward $2, 263 19 

Staples Bros. Co 13 44 

Thompson Hardware Co 45 31 

William H. Wiggin 377 63 

2,699 57 

Transferred to General Treasury 

Fund 43 

$2,700 00 



IAT..» ■ 



SANITARY IMPROVEMENTS IN SUNDRY SCHOOL 

HOUSES AND NEW CHIMNEY AT 

HIGHLAND SCHOOL. 

Appropriation $600 00 

600 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

To Sundry Persons for Labor. ... 41 68 
App. School Houses, Work 

and Material 13 76 

E. J. Carroll & Co 89 10 

J. D. Danahy 193 52 

W. A. Mack & Co.... 5 09 

P. O'Hearn 151 75 

D. T. Sullivan 5 00 

W. W. Wilder & Co 100 00 

599 90 

Transferred to General Treasury 

Fund 10 

$600 00 



auditor's report. 143 

SCHOOLS— Continued. 

MIDDLESEX VILLAGE SCHOOL BELL. 

Appropriation $500 00 

$500 00 

ma ■naMfct.JMW— nam— t— n 

EXPENDITURES. 

To Sundry Persons for Labor 57 88 

Swain Turbine & Mfg. Co ... . 250 00 

307 88 

Balance to 1905 192 12 

$500 00 

SEWER MAINTENANCE, SALARIES. 

Appropriation $2,939 00 

$2,939 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

App. Sewer Maintenance, Labor. . . 396 76 

E. S. Foss. 229 54 

S. D. Butterworth 810 00 

D. W. Bugbee 581 51 

F. W. Lazelle 348 14 

C. H. Raymond 530 32 

$2,896 27 

Transferred to General Treasury 

Fund 42 73 

$2,939 00 



SEWER MAINTENANCE, LABOR. 

Appropriation ; $12,000 00 

Received from Sundry Departments 509 54 

$12,509 54 



144 



AUDITOR S REPORT. 



SEWER MINTENANCE, LABOR— Continued. 

EXPENDITURES. 

To Sundry Persons for Labor $12,451 57 



Transferred to General Treasury 

Fund 57 97 



$12,509 54 



f '— 

SEWER MAINTENANCE, SUNDRIES. 

Appropriation $8,561 00 

Recepts, App. Sewer Construction, 3,074 05 

App. 4th of July Observance. . 112 38 

App. Parks 22 00 



$11,769 43 



EXPENDITURES. 

Hardware and Tools : 

To Adams Hardware & Paint Co. 199 84 

Boutwell Bros 88 47 

W. T. S. Bartlett.... 1 20 

J. C. Bennett 34 63 

Colonial Supply Co 64 00 

F. W. Cheney & Co 6 00 

E. P. Flanders & Co ' 459 06 

H. C. Girard 16 60 

W. A. Mack & Co 26 00 

Smith & Lawrence 11 25 

Henry B. Temby 890 30 

Thompson Hardware Co 3 62 



1,800 97 



Lumber : 

To Burnham & Davis Lumber Co. 603 25 

Amasa Pratt Co 347 03 

Pratt & Forrest 584 60 

A. G. Thompson 181 33 

W. H. Wiggin . 402 62 



2,118 83 



Amount carried forward $3,919 80 



AUDITOR S REPORT. 



145 



SEWER MAINTENANCE, SUNDRIES— Continued. 
Amount brought forward $3,919 80 

Faints, Oil etc. : 

To Adams Hardware & Paint Co. 
Boston Engineers Supply Co. . 

C. B. Coburn Co 

Walter Coburn & Co 



Rubber Boots and Repairing : 

To Boulger Shoe Co 

Patrick Fitzgibbon 

E . Lavery 

O'Sullivan Bros. Co 

Sunlight Shoe Store 

Pipe Fittings, etc. : 

To Boutwell Bros 

Boston Engineers Supply Co 

II. R. Barker Mfg- Co 

Colonial Supply Co 

Doherty Bros 

Fitzpatrick & Welch 

Louis ->LarIam me 

J. W. Stewart 

Union Iron Foundry 

Welch Bros 

Stationery, Printing, etc. : 

To Thomas H. Lawler 

G. C. Prince & Son , 

Charles E. Robinson ........ 



Lighting : 

To Lowell Electric Light Corp 20 10 



11 


90 


530 


28 


1G8 


52 


10 


76 


75 


60 


30 


50 


38 


15 


82 


50 


51 


00 


7 


47 


239 


20 


5 


00 


G2 


40 


508 


62 


18G 


30 


1 


00 




60 


346 


01 


35 


22 




50 


125 


50 


14 


00 



721 46 



277 75 



1,451 82 



140 00 
20 10 



Carriage- hire and Transportation : 

To American Express Co 9 65 

B. & M. R. R 1 65 

Meserve's L. & B. Express. ... 60 

J. H. Sparks 19 00 30 90 



Amount carried forward $6,561 83 



146 



AUDITOR S REPORT. 



SEWER, MAINTENANCE SUNDRIES— Continued. 



Amount brought forward 

Brick, Cement, Fuel, etc. : 

To Edward Cawley 

Connors Bros. Construction Co. 

H. M. Clark, Agt 

Home Coal Co 

Lowell Coal Co 

P. O'Hearn 

E. A. & A. T. Smith 

Staples Bros. Co 

D. T. Sullivan 

W, H. Ward 

Carriages, Harnesses and Repairs : 
To A. H. Cluer 

C. H. Hanson & Co 

F. B. Hill & Co 

D. W'. Parker 

Sawyer Carriage Co 

Sundries : 

App. Engineering 

' ' Streets, Sundries 

u Streets, Yard Labor . . . 

4 ' Water Works 

Owen E. Brennan 

F. M. Bill & Co 

John Cross 

• M. J. Cahill 

Peter Corcoran 

Derby & Morse 

Finn Bros 

D. Gage 

C. F. Hatch Co 

E. F. Hathaway 

C. M. Holmes 

G. E. Hutchins 

C. H. Hanson & Co 

Louis Laflamme and wife. . . . 

Lafiin-Rand Powder Co 

Lowell Wall Paper Co 

Amounts carried forward 







$6,561 83 


331 


88 




41 


25 




334 


99 




11 


00 




582 


19 




5 


25 




1 


50 




151 


07 




246 


41 




131 


25 


1,836 79 






37 


40 




42 


00 




24 


90 




2 


50 




18 


43 


125 23 


899 


56 


627 


36 




91 


25 




60 


22 




1 


35 




20 25 




6 


00 




1 


75 




15 


45 




6 


10 




48 


00 




2 


08 




1 


75 




13 


20 




174 


65 




40 


10 




141 


00 




10 28 




460 


00 
75 




$2,621 


10 


$8,523 85 



auditor's report. 147 

SEWER, MAINTENANCE SUNDRIES— Continued. 

Amounts brought forward $2,621 10 $8,523 85 

T. J. McDonald 102 1G 

G. A. Nelson 3 00 

G. L. Ready & Son 72 80 

Richardson Hotel 5 00 

Simpson & Rowland 81 05 

J. A. Thompson 4 00 

Tucke & Parker 9 60 

F. A. Tuttle 333 50 

Waverly Hotel 11 00 

3,243 21 

11,767 06 
Transferred to General Treasury 

Fund 2 37 

$11,769~43 

Ml M 1 1— M— MhMWMW 

SEWER CONSTRUCTION. 

Appropriation $120,000 00 

Receipts, Sundry Persons for over- 
drafts 16 00 

$120,016 00 



♦ 



EXPENDITURES. 

To Sundry Persons for Labor 90,734 72 

90,734 72 

Engineering 1,455 10 

1,455 10 

Hardware, Tools, etc. : 

To H. R. Barker Mfg. Co 1,368 56 

D. J. Leary 11 95 

Union Iron Foundry 233 55 

1,614 06 

Brick, Cement, Fuel, etc. : 

To Edward Cawley 6,982 65 

P. P. Connors & Co 230 00 

H. M. Clark, Agt 1,914 65 

Amounts carried forward 9,127 30 $93,803 88 



148 



AUDITOR S REPORT. 



SEWER CONSTRUCTION 

Amounts brought forward 

Home Coal Co 

Lowell Coal Co 

F. A. Malorey 

D. T. Sullivan 

Lumber: 

To Burnham & Davis Lumber Co. 

H. P. Beals 

Davis & Sargent Lumber Co. . 

Amasa Pratt & Co 

William H. Wiggin 

Transportation, Teaming, etc. : 
App. Watering Streets 

B. & M. R. R 

C. H. Hanson & Co 

Willis Hobbs 

Damages : 

To Mary O'Neil 

Peter O'Neil 

Sundries : 

App. Water Works 

' 4 Sewer Maintenance, Sundries, 
" Sewer Maintenance, Labor. . . 

A. L. Butman 

M. J. Drummond & Co 

Gauthier & Lemire 

T. J. McDonald 

Transferred to General Treasury 
Fund 



-Continued. 



$9,127 30 $93,803 88 



100 93 
3,093 63 

224 20 
1,299 56 


13 845 r;9 


28 96 

269 47 

682 50 

595 15 

7 30 


1,583 38 
1 670 66 


744 00 

709 16 

138 00 

79 50 


360 00 
350 00 


• 710 00 


158 48 
3,074 05 

91 42 
16 00 

935 93 

92 00 
8 00 


4,375 88 






115,989 42 

4,026 58 




$120,016 00 



auditor's report. 149 

STREETS, SALARIES. 

Appropriation , . . . $4,000 00 

$4,000 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

To Laforest Beals, Superintendent 795 70 

Fred W. Farnham 4 < 1,204 30 

George W. Hartwell, Assistant 

Superintendent 1,400 15 

C. H. Raymond, Clerk 599 85 

$4,000 00 

STREETS, YARD LABOR. 

Appropriation $11,000 00 

Receipts, App. Sewer Maintenance 91 25 

" Watering Streets. . 43180 

IT. W. Worcester overdraft. . . 10 50 

11,533 55 

EXPENDITURES. 

To Sundry Persons for Labor 11,501 94 

Transferred to General Treasury 

Fund 31 61 

~~ 11,533 55 

STREETS, LABOR. 

Appropriation $90,000 00 

Additional Appropriation. 43,500 00 

Receipt, Sundry Persons overdrafts 83 10 

133,583 10 

EXPENDITURES. 

To Sundry Persons for Labor 131,589 4G 

Transferred to General Treasury 

Fund 1,993 64 

$133,583 10 



150 



auditor's report. 



STREETS, SUNDRIES. 



Appropriation 

Additional Appropriation 

Receipts, App. Parks 

ik Sewer Maintenance 
" Watering Streets. . 



EXPENDITURES 

Fuel: 

To Edward Cawley 

Home Coal Co 

Joseph Mullin 

D. T. Sullivan 

Hay, Grain, etc. : 

To Joseph Bowers 

Coffey Bros 

Fred A. Fox 

George M. Foster 

Livingston Grain Co 

Julia Hart 

Joseph Mullin . 

T. J. McDonald 

H. E. Noyes & Son 

J . B . Sabre 

Paul Vigeant & Co 

James Whittet 

O. D. Wilder 

Water : 

App. Water Works 

Carriages, Harnesses and Repairs 

To Robert Barris 

A. L. Butman 

A. H. Cluer 

Donovan Harness Co 

C. H. Hanson & Co 

F. B. Hill &Co 

II. J. O'Dowd 

D. W. Parker 

Amounts carried forward 



$45,500 00 




5,685 


12 




109 


67 




627 


36 




1,581 


43 


$53,503 58 






RES. 

3 


28 




1,066 


71 




83 


30 




8 


32 


1,161 61 






40 


25 




297 


77 




593 


95 




899 


32 




125 


00 




97 


60 




2,999 


98 




1,557 


57 




3,190 


56 




891 


68 




455 


92 




195 


40 




34 


00 


11,379 00 


723 


79 






723 79 


6 


00 


61 


50 




68 


05 




254 


62 




6 


00 




80 


90 




29 


00 




93 


80 




$599 


87 


$13,264 40 



AUDITOR S REPORT. 



151 



STREETS, SUNDRIES— Continued. 



Amounts brought forward 

Parker Harness Co 

Sawyer Carriage Co 

J . H. Sparks 

Hardware and Tools : 

To Adams Hardware & Paint Co. 

Ames Plow Co 

W. T. S. Bartlett 

Boston Engineers Supply Co . . 

J. C. Bennett 

Boutwell Bros 

E. W. Brown 

Colonial Supply Co 

E. P. Flanders & Co 

H, C. Girard 

Heselton Brush Mfg. Co 

N. D. Lafleur 

W. A. Mack & Co 

McBarron Co 

N. E. Brown Co 

Henry B. Temby 

Thompson Hardware Co 

E. W. Trull 

Lumber : 

To Burnham & Davis 

Burnham & Davis Lumber Co. 

C. M. Holmes 

Amasa Pratt & Co 

Pratt & Forrest 

William H. Wiggin 

Concrete, Cement, Gravel, Edge- 
stone and Paving : 

To Jacques Boisvert 

P. P. Conners & Co 

Lowell Coal Co 

Mahan & Meehan 

F. A. Malorey 

Mass. Broken Stone Co 

Amounts carried forward 



$599 87 


$13,264 40 


2 25 




4 25 




38 10 






644 47 


98 56 


13 14 




19 16 




314 00 




12 50 




545 28 




.12 50 




269 00 




596 09 




8 08 




14 00 




11 94 




15 71 




33 00 




835 00 




811 50 




71 01 




16 00 






3,696 47 


30 10 


2,110 35 




10 75 




1,391 10 




118 47 




663 71 






4,324 48 




42 20 




25 00 




49 00 




32 50 




2,353 30 




745 36 




$3,247 36 


$21,929 82 



152 



AUDITORS REPORT. 



STREETS, SUNDRIES— Continued. 



Amounts brought forward . 

E. A. & A. T. Smith.. ...... 

Union Paving Co 

James Walsh 

Pipe Fittings, etc. : 

To H. R. Barker Mfg. Co 

Buffalo Steam Roller Co 

Carroll Bros 

W. W. Carey 4 

Colonial Supply Co 

Parrell & Conaton 

Charles E. Gee 

Good Roads Machinery Co 

W. A. Mack & Co 

Pevey Bros 

Scannell Boiler Works 

J. W. Stewart 

Union Iron Foundry 

Welch Bros 

Painters Supplies : 

To Adams Hardware & Paint Co. 

Boston Engineers Supply Co. . 

John C. Bennett 

Sylvester Bean 

Owen E. Brennan 

C. B. Coburn Co 

Walter Coburn & Co 

Keystone Lubricating Co 

Smith & Lawrence 

Books, Stationery, Printing and 
Advertising : 

To J. Harry Boardman 

Courier-Citizen Co 

Daily Mail Publishing Co 

Dumas & Co 

J. M. Fellows 

Thomas H. Lawler 

Amounts carried forward 



$3,247 


36 


$21,929 82 


4,672 


14 




1,137 


97 




879 


34 


Q OQfi 81 


20 


53 




80 


50 




12 


00 




8 


35 




729 


02 




2 


20 




704 


14 




85 


75 




28 


76 




13 


25 




7 


90 




36 


70 




64 


18 




5 


00 


1 788 28 


47 


94 




11 


14 




15 


60 




2 


30 
50 




353 


98 




31 


78 




17 


50 




2 


75 


483 49 


2 


70 


10 


50 




10 


50 




11 


50 




3 


00 




15 


35 




$53 


55 


$34,138 40 



auditor's report 



153 



STREETS, SUNDRIES— Continued. 



Amounts brought forward 

Osmond Long. 

Lowell Sun 

Municipal Engineering Co. . . . 

G. C. Prince & Son 

Charles E. Robinson 

Sampson, Murdock & Co 

Smith Premier Typewriter Co. 
Sunday Telegram 

Carriage-hire and Transportation : 

To American Express Co 

B. & M. R. R 

Man. & Con. Express Co 

Meserve's L. & B. Express Co 

Morse Coach Co 

N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. ... 
N. Y. & B. Des. Express Co. 
J. H. Sparks 

Lighting : 

To Lowell Electric Light Corp. . 
Lowell Gas Light Co 

Telephone : 

To N. E. T. & T. Co 

Veterinary : 

To Charles E. Munn 

J. H. Sparks 

Teaming : 

App. Watering Streets, Sundries . . 

John Brady 

E. P. Bryant 

B. G. Brown 

A. A. Brown 

A. D. Boynton 

Burnham & Davis 

Amounts carried forward 



$53 55 $34,138 40 

3 20 
10 50 

2 00 

30 40 

316 30 

6 00 
20 50 

4 72 

447 17 



15 


20 


554 


51 




15 


1 


15 


6 


00 




44 


1 


25 


32 


00 



419 31 
62 55 



29 57 



610 70 



481 86 



29 58 



260 00 




62 00 






322 00 


628 00 


74 00 




186 00 




217 50 




128 00 




364 00 




v 200 00 




$1,797 50 


$36,029 71 



154 



AUDITOR S REPORT. 



STREETS, SUNDRIES— Continued. 



Amounts brought forward 

M. Blanchard 

Jacques Boisvert 

E. Bibeault 

Patrick Cogger 

Conway Transfer Co 

P. P. Conners & Co. ., 

Connors Bros. Construction Co. 

C. H. Clapp & Co 

E. Duren 

G. F. Fall 

Frank Fay 

C. A. Oilman 

Willis Hob'bs 

C. H. Hanson & Co 

Home Coal Co 

B. W. Johnson 

Joseph Loiselle 

Joseph Mullin 

George H. McNabb 

O. F. Prentiss 

Pratt & Forrest 

A. L. Pendergast 

John A. Simpson 

H. W. Tarbell 

William H. Wiggin 

Engineering : 

App. Engineering 

Sundries: 

To Owen E. Brennan 

E. W. Brown 

J. P. Curley 

C. H. Clapp & Co 

Fred C. Church 

A. F. Frost's Steam Laundry.. 

Patrick M. Flanagan 

Gilbride's 

Helen M. Gilmore 

Daniel Gage 

Amounts carried forward 



$1,797 50 $36,029 71 

28 00 

28 60 
20 00 

216 50 

146 00 

32 00 

29 25 
92 00 
68 00 
20 00 
78 00 

102 00 
435 75 
1,370 50 
373 50 
133 25 
272 00 
276 50 

72 00 
108 00 

90 00 

20 00 
336 50 
302 50 

82 00 
6,530 35 



3,490 30 



3,490 30 



1 


00 


10 


00 


1 


20 


29 


00 


175 


21 


31 


13 


200 00 


9 


03 


6 


04 


36 


59 



$499 20 $46,050 36 



AUDITOR S REPORT. 



155 



STREETS, SUNDRIES— Continued. 



Amounts brought forward 

C. H. Hanson & Co 

J. G. Hill 

A. G. Hill 

E. F. Hathaway 

Charles T. Haskell 

C. M. Holmes 

J. G. Holden 

Keefe Bros 

L. S. Kimball 

Laflin & Rand Powder Co. . . . 

R. J. Lang& Co 

Frank E. McNabb 

F. M. Merrill 

Middlesex Registry of Deeds. . 

James Murkland & Son 

George A. Nelson 

O'Suliivan Bros. Co 

A. L. Park 

F. E. Putnam 

Harry M. Parker 

A. L. Ready 

S. C. Rowe • 

C. H. Raymond 

Ricnardson Hotel 

Rice & Co 

A. G. Stedman 

Simpson & Rowland 

W. T. True Co 

II. Thompson 

A. S. Taylor 

Talbot Dye. & Chemical Co . . 

Talbot Clothing Co 

Town of Dracut 

F. A. Tuttle 

United States Wood Preserving 

Co 

H. E. Webster 

William H. Ward 

H. F. Whiting 

C. L. Woods 

Amount carried forward 



$499 


20 $46,050 36 


587 


05 


50 00 


17 


20 


13 


50 




50 


27 


65 


18 


60 


13 


25 


11 


25 


69 


00 


5 


70 


6 


20 


4 


00 


14 50 


9 


50 


4 


50 


9 


00 


160 


00 


8 


40 


75 


00 


19 


60 


10 


00 


1 


00 


4 00 




25 


26 


40 


58 


55 


10 00 


21 


50 


] 


50 


3 


50 


3 


00 


35 


00 


299 


00 


5,097 


39 


84 


25 


7 


50 


1 


78 


106 00 


$4,394 


22 $46,050 36 



156 auditor's report. 

STREETS, SUNDRIES— Continued. 

Amounts brought forward $7,394 22 $46,050 36 

Waverly Hotel 49 00 

ZopherCo ... 10 00 

v 7,453 22 

$53,503 58 

SIDEWALK REPAIRS. 

Appropriation > $5,000 00 

$5,000 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

To Sundry Persons for Labor. . . . 1,521 08 

App. Engineering 91 19 

Ham & Carter Co 615 00 

E. A. & A. T. Smith 2,167 26 

James Walsh 604 67 

4,999 20 

Transferred to General Treasury 

Fund 80 

$5,000 00 

NEW SIDEWALKS. 

Appropriation $8,500 00 

$8,500 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

To Sundry Persons for Labor 2,720 60 

F. A. Malorey 3,968 58 

E. A. & A. T. Smith 1,716 22 

8,405 40 

Transferred to General Treasury 

Fund 94 60 

$8,500 00 



auditor's report. 157 



LAYING OUT, GRADING AND EXTENDING 
BY STREET. 

Balance from 1903 2,500 00 

$ 2 ' 500 °Q 

EXPENDITURES. 

To Sundry Persons for Labor. . . . 1,554 15 

A pp. Engineering 55 58 

Robert G. Bartlett, 10,020 ft. 

land 701 40 

Annie Bent, 722 ft", land 172 00 

, 2,483 13 

Transferred to General Treasury 

Fund 16 87 

$2,500 00 



WATERING STREETS, LABOR. 

Appropriation $5,000 00 

Receipts, Sundry Persons overdrafts 28 00 

$5,028 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

To Sundry Persons for Labor. . . . 5,011 71 



Transferred to General Treasury 

Fund 16 29 



WATERING STREETS, SUNDRIES. 



$5,028 00 



Appropriation $10,500 00 

Receipts, App. Streets, Sundries... 628 00 

l * Sewer Maintenance 744 00 

$11,872 00 



158 auditor's report. 



WATERING STREETS, SUNDRIES— Continued. 



EXPENDITURES. 

Hardware, Pipe Fittings, etc. : 
To Boutwell Bros 

H. R. Baiker Mfg. Co 

E. J. Carroll & Co 

Farrell & Conaton 

H. J. Fitzpatrick. . . , 

Fltzpatrick & Welch 

D.J. Leary 

D. Ziskind 



Carriages, Harnesses and Repairing : 

App. Streets, Yard Labor : . . . 

41 " Sundries 

A. H. Cluer.... 

Donovan Harness Co 

C. H. Hanson & Co 



Hay, Grain, etc. : 

To Livingston Grain Co. 

Paul Vigeant & Co . 

O. D. Wilder 



Fuel and Stone : 

To Home Coal Co 

F. A Malorey 

Sundries : 

App. Engineering 

4i Water Works 

American Car Sprinkler Co. . . 

Adams Hardware & Paint Co. 

B. & M. R. R 

B. & N. St. Ry. Co 

Dumas & Co 

C. H, Hanson & Co 

Lowell Electric Light Corp. . . 
T. J. McDonald 



4 


34 


37 


86 


1 


35 


48 


11 


42 


00 


160 00 


160 


00 


7 


51 


431 


80 


1,581 


43 


5 


10 


12 


50 


18 


00 


64 


41 


74 


49 


25 


00 


i 
21 


50 


32 


39 


219 


00 


1,370 


39 


5,750 00 


21 


15 


20 


00 


774 00 


10 00 


858 


75 


43 


16 


5 


30 



461 17 



2,048 83 



163 90 



53 89 



Amounts carried forward $9,071 75 $2,727 79 



auditor's report. 159 

WATERING STREETS, SUNDRIES— Continued. 

Amounts brought forward $ 9,071 75 $2,727 79 

J. J. O'Donnell 1 80 

J. L. & H. K. Potter 21 60 

Amasa Pratt Co 21 12 

9,116 27 

11,844 06 
Transferred to General Treasury 

Fund 27 94 

$11,872 00 



SUPPLY, SALARIES. 

Appropriation $5,429 00 

Additional Appropriation 15 58 

5,444 58 

EXPENDITURES. 

To James E. Donnelly, Chief of 

Department of Supplies. .. 2,400 00 

Abram Fenton, Inspector 785 00 

Thomas J. Murphy, Inspector . 745 75 

Eleanor M. Churchill, Clerk.. . 782 50 

Samuel A. McPheters, Clerk. . 731 33 

$5,444 58 



SUPPLY, SUNDRIES. 

Appropriation $875 00 

Additional Appropriation 47 63 



922 63 



160 auditor's report. 

SUPPLY, SUNDRIES— Continued. 



EXPENDITURES. 

Books, Stationery, Printing, etc. : 
To Carter's Ink Co 


132 
3 

7 
19 

2 
49 

3 
53 


76 
75 
10 
50 
45 
57 
29 
00 
25 


271 

189 

260 
42 

155 

3 




J. M. Fellows 




Thomas H. Lawler 

M. C. Olson Mfg. Co 

G. C. Prince & Son 




F. A. M. Tobin 




Carriages, Harnesses and Repairing: 
To Donovan Harness Co 

C. H. Hanson & Co 


37 75 
11 25 

103 00 
34 70 

' 2 50 


67 


F. B. Hill & Co 




H. J. O'Dowd 








Hoard of Horses : 

To P. F. McNulty 

T. J. McDermott 


75 
185 


02 
42 


20 


Shoeing Horse : 


42 


60 


44 


Telephone. Transportation : 

B. & M. R. R 

J. F. Kelley & Co ' 

N. E. T. & T. Co 


101 

39 
13 


30 
25 
75 
35 
50 
47 


60 


Sundries : 

To J. A. Filion 


1 
1 


50 

25 
35 


62 


Geo. H. Gage. 




A. G. Pollard & Co 














10 






$922 


63 











AUDITORS REPORT. 



161 



WATER WORKS. 



Balance Jan. 1, 1904 

Received from Sundry Persons for 
Water Rates, Service Pipe, etc. 


3,059 92 
197,074 64 






3. 


$200,133 56 


expenditure: 




Salaries : 






To Robert J. Crowley ] 

Michael J. Dowd ! Water 
August Fels j Board 
Frank L. Weaver J 


400 00 
400 00 
400 00 
400 00 
1,800 00 




To John W. Crawford, Clerk 

To Sundry Persons for Labor. . 


1,600 00 
64,570 63 


3,400 00 






66,170 63 


A pp. City Debt instalments on 




21,600 00 


Interest : 






To Commonwealth of Mass 


1,400 00 


' 


Sundry Persons (coupons on 


41,300 00 




City of Lynn, Sinking Fund . . 
B. V. French, Treasurer 


150 00 
150 00 




Lowell Institution for Savings, 


831 00 


> 


Roundout Savings Bank 

Mary S. Felton 


1,500 00 
300 00 




Paid Sundry Persons refunds on 




45,631 00 




1,163 26 








1,163 26 




$137,964 89 



162 



AUDITOR S REPORT. 



WATER, WORKS— Continued. 



Amount brought forward $137,964 89 

Fuel: 

To John Brady 10 00 

Edward Cawley 901 39 

Home Coal Co 7 00 

Lowell Coal Co 13,628 88 

Joseph Mullin 19 28 

Daniel T. Sullivan 1,648 60 



Pipe Fittings, Hydrants, Meters, 
etc. : 

To H. R. Barker Mfg. Co.. 

Builders Iron Foundry 

Carroll Bros 

Chapman Valve Mfg. Co 

Chelmsford Foundry Co. 

A. W. Chesterton & Co 

Coffin Valve Co 

Daniel Cushing & Co 

Doherty Bros 

W. & B. Douglass 

Harry S. Drury 

M. J. Drummond & Co 

Eastern Forge Co. of Mass.. . . 

Eagle Foundry 

Farrell & Conaton 

E-. F. Farrell 

G. W. Fifield , 

W. D. Forbes Co 

Greenwood & Daggett Co .... 

George Green 

Hersey Mfg. Co 

Higgins & Kerwin 

Jenkins Bros 

Jones-Guage Co 

Kennedy Valve Mfg. Co 

Knowls Steam Pump Works. . 

D. Lovejoy & Son 

Lead Lined Iron Pipe Co 

Lowell Machine Shop 

Amounts carried forward 



16,215 15 



103 


06 


279 


00 


142 


57 


185 


66 


80 


00 


52 


00 


247 


00 


104 


06 


44 


61 


2 


12 


1,124 


84 


700 40 


74 40 




11 


59 


53 


3 


00 


113 


50 


10 


65 


168 


74 


4 


00 


1,179 


65 


119 


34 


24 


86 


10 


00 


62 


05 


42 


10 


26 


77 


2,392 


65 


6 


58 



$7,363 20 $154,180 04 



AUDITOR S REPORT. 



163 



WATER, WOKKS— Continued. 



Amounts brought forward 

Locke Regulator Co 

Ludlow Valve Mfg. Co 

Lynchburg Foundry Co 

W. McLarney & Co 

Middlesex Machine Co 

A. M. Morton & Co 

H. Meulher Mfg. Co 

National Meter Co 

Neptune Meter Co 

A. F. Nichols 

Penn. Metal Ceiling and Roof- 
ing Co 

Perrin, Seamans & Co 

Pevey Bros 

Renssellaer Mfg. Co 

A. L. Ready & Son 

Scannell Boiler Works 

A. P. Smith Mfg. Co 

Thomson Meter Co 

Union Iron Foundry 

Union Water Meter Co. ...... 

Walworih Mfg. Co 

Welch Bros 

R. D. Wood & Co 

Henry R. Worthington 

Hardware, etc. : 

To Adams Hardware & Paint Co. 

W. T. S. Bartlett 

Owen E. Brennan 

Bout well Bros 

John Callaghan 

Alfred Drake 

E. P. Flanders & Co 

H. C. Girard , 

W. A. Mack & Co 

A. L. Ready & Son 

H. B. Shattuck & Son 

Smith & Lawrence 

Thompson Hardware Co 

Amount carried forward 



$7,363 20 $154,180 04 

17 46 

694 73 

1,898 84 

11 93 

10 47 

21 65 

242 76 

2,366 26 

78 25 

64 

45 00 

51 33 

7 20 

201 65 

90 

261 67 

511 00 

469 16 

327 46 

59 05 

29 56 

25 19 

19 00 

4 48 





14,718 84 


21 66 




2 96 




35 




70 68 




23 42 




1 00 




159 61 




110 81 




9 60 




14 00 




2 20 




1 73 




68 89 


487 91 


* 





$169,386 79 



164 auditor's report. 

WATER, WORKS— Continued. 
Amount brought forward $109,386 70 

Lumber : 

To Burnham & Davis Lumber Co. 108 00 

Pratt & Forrest 241 80 

Amasa Pratt & Co 52 42 

William H. Wiggin. 17 78 

480 00 

Oils, Paints, Packing, etc. : 

To Sylvester Bean 140 19 

Boston Engineers Supply Co . 495 03 

Challenge Tube Cleaner Co. . . 00 

C. B. Coburn Co 302 11 \ 

Cutter, Wood & Stevens Co.. . 6 30 

Eagle Oil and Supply Co 132 31 

Garlock Packing Co 71 37 

F. H. Griffin & Co 100 00 

Hart Packing Co 15 86 

Hayden& Co 8 75 

A. L. Kittredge & Co 25 

G. W. Knowlton Rubber Co.. 18 66 

Smith & Lawrence 3 25 

The Greenwood & Daggett Co. 76 50 

Valvoline Oil Co 226 69 

1,603 87 
Stationery, Printing, Advertising, 
etc. : 

To J. Harry Boardman 1 50 

Frank P. Bridges & Co 3 00 

Butterfield Printing Co 169 9] 

Courier-Citizen Co 332 25 

Daily Mail Publishing Co 20 00 

Dumas & Co 153 25 , 

Engineering News Publishing 5 00 

, Fire & Water Engineering. ... 3 00 

Harry C. Kittredge 3 15 

Lawler Printing Co . 7 05 

Thomas H. Lawler 3 05 

Libby Printing Co 20 35 

Lowell Sun 19 20 

Amounts carried forward $740 711 $171,470 72 



auditor's report. 165 

WATER, WORKS— Continued. 

Amounts brought forward $740 71 $171,470 72 

Lepine & Co 

M. C. Olson Mfg. Co 

G. C. Prince & Son 

Saturday Free Press 

Sampson, Murdock & Co. . . . 

Sunday Telegram 

Tilton & Co .. 

F A. M. Tobin 

Union Printing Co 

M. G. Wight & Co 

Mason Work and Material : 

To John Carr & Sons 

Edward Cawlcy 

P. Cogger 

P. Conlon 

Lowell Coal Co 

F. A. Malorey. . 

E. A. & A. T. Smith 

Staples Bros. Co 

Daniel T. Sullivan 

Hay, Grain, etc. : 

To Ame&Co 

Charles Dumas & Co 

George M. Foster 

T. J. McDonald 

H. E. Noycs & Son 

Paul Vigeant & Co 

O. D. Wilder 



Carriages, Harnesses and Repairing 

To Abbot Downing Co 

Robert Barris 

E. P. Bryant 

Donovan Harness Co 

F. B. Hill & Co 

H.J. O'Dowd 

Sawyer Carriage Co 

Amount carried forward 



10 50 




2 57 




43 17 




1 00 




6 00 




9 79 




50 




29 25 




2 75 




25 75 






871 99 


45 50 


43 76 




12 50 




591 88 




43 25 




353 75 




70 50 




943 53 




122 25 






2,226 92 




25 00 


s 


3 90 




48 76 




146 45 




63 60 




160 24 




3 90 






451 85 


160 50 




14 00 




25 62 




182 76 




204 40 




10 50 




64 25 


662 03 




$175,683 51 



166 



AUDITOR S REPORT. 



WATER, WORKS— Continued. 



Amount brought forward 

Shoeing Horses : 

To S. A. Shattuck 

Lighting and Telephone : 

To Lowell Gas Light Co 

N. E. Tel. & Tel. Co 

Insurance : 

To N. G. Norcross 

Expenses of Water Board: 

To J. W. Crawford 

Robert J. Crowley 

New American 

Page Catering Co 

Robert J. Thomas 

Transportation, Carriage-hire, etc. : 

To American Express Co 

B. & M. R. R 

E. Duren. .... 

Man. & Con. Express Co 

Meserve's L. & B. Express Co. 
N. Y. & B. Des. Express Co. 
N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R .... 
J. H. Sparks 

Sundries : 

To App. Engineering 

Bay State Incandescent Lamp 
Co 

Maria Bennett 

John Cross 

Derby & Morse 

Daniel G. Fox 

Gookin Bros 

Daniel Gage . . . 

C. E. Guthrie 

C. H. Hanson & Co. 

Amounts carried forward 



137 19 



3 


69 


97 


08 


15 


00 


555 


31 


4 


50 


2 


00 


90 


00 


42 


50 


31 


32 


622 


45 


164 


25 


3 


25 




65 


6 


65 


28 


55 


37 00 



1,346 69 

4 40 
15 00 

2 00 



$175,683 51 



137 19 



100 77 



15 00 



694 31 



894 12 



6 


06 


30 


10 


12 


00 


8 


10 




45 


390 


00 



$1,814 80 $177,524 90 



auditor's report. 167 



WATER, WORKS— Continued. 

Amounts brought forward 

Joseph Holtham 

C. W. Holmes 

Keefe Bros 

Lafflin-Rand Powder Co 

Lowell Rendering Co 

Lowell Wall Paper Co 

Lull & Hartford 

T. J. McDonald 

J. J. McManmon 

C. H. May & Co 

James Murkland & Son 

John J. McCann 

H. C. McOsker 

G. A. Nelson 

O'Brien Bros 

O'Sullivan Bros. Co 

Prop's Locks and Canals 

Harry Raynes 

G. G. Read 

Lorenzo E. Smith & Eben B, 

Stafford 

George F. Smith 

Simpson & Rowland 

W. A. Sherman 

A. G. Stiles 

Talbot Dye. & Chemical Co. . 

Tucke & Parker. 

E. G. Twohey 

Town of Chelmsford 

Waverly Hotel 

H. F. Whiting 

Whittet & Co 

Mitchell, Wing & Co 

Frank I. Zipper 



Balance to 1905 



$1,814 80 


$177,524 90 


30 38 




385 13 




90 




30 50 




21 42 




2 70 




1 50 




3 20 




133 24 




4 20 




20 25 




75 




1 16 




3 75 




8 00 




54 00 




392 90 




15 00 




16 50 




92 46 




40 50 




17 75 




9 50 




65 




3 15 




143 09 




359 49 




55 50 




17 00 




90 




72 78 




19 04 




1 25 






3,773 34 




181,298 24 




. 18,835 32 




$200,133 56 



168 auditor's report. 

STATE AID SALARIES AND SUNDRIES. 

Appropriation $2,200 00 

$2,200 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

To H. M. Potter, Superintendent 1,200 00 

Mary C. Brennan, Assistant 

Suprintendent 720 00 

1,920 00 

Buckland Printing Co 6 50 

Butterfield Printing Co 7 00 

Courier-Citizen Co 4 00 

Thomas H. Lawler 12 00 

N. E. T. & T. Co 3 60 

M. C. Olson Mfg. Co 2 57 

H. M. Potter 126 97 

G. C. Prince & Son 18 50 

Sampson, Murdock & Co 3 00 

J. H. Sparks 3 00 

187 14 

2,107 14 

Transferred to General Treasury 

Fund 92 86 

$2,200 00 

STATE AID. 

Appropriation .\ $15,000 00 

Receipts, overdrafts 50 00 

~ $15,050 00 

mmmmtmimmm^mmmmmmmtmm 

EXPENDITURES. 

Paid Sundry Persons for Aid in 

1904 14,937 50 

Transferred to General Treasury 

Fund 112 50 

$15,050 00 



auditor's report. 169 



MILITARY AID. 
Appropriation $5,000 00 



EXPENDITURES. 



$5,000 00 



Paid Sundry Persons for Aid In* 

1904..... 3,931 00 

Transferred to General Treasury 

Fund 1,069 00 

$5,000 00 



SOLDIERS RELIEF. 

Appropriation $9,100 00 

Receipts, Sundry Persons overdrafts 48 00 

— 9,148 00 



EXPENDITURES. 

Cash Allowances 6,144 00 

6,144 00 

Provisions, Fuel etc. : 

App. Paupers, O. D. R. Gen- 
eral Sundries 77 80 

W. H. Brown 2 0Q 

J. S. Brooks 44 00 

John H. Burke 52 00 

Blackstone Market 6 00 

Broadway Cash Market 26 00 

John Brady.. 1 00 

Edward Cawley 151 80 

C. F. Devno.... 94 00 

Family Supply Co 240 00 

W. F. Gallagher 18 00 

W. T. Griffin '. 38 00 

W. J. Hardy & Co 56 00 

A, M. Huntoon & Co . 5 00 

Amounts carried forward $811 40 $6,144 00 



170 auditor's report. 

SOLDIERS RELIEF— Continued. 

Amounts brought forward $811 40 $6,144 00 

Keefe Bros 93 92 

A. J. Keith 71 00 

J. M. Kingsbury 124 00 

Lowell Coal Co 196 84 

Lowell Gas Light Co. ...... . 4 00 

George Lynch 275 00 

Lincoln Square Grocery 42 00 

Hugh McCluskey 5 00 

J. J. McCausland & Co 10 00 

McDonald Bros 28 00 

O'Sullivan Bros. Co 1 50 

M. N. Peabody * 2 00 < 

Ranlett & Ranlett 25 00 

Ranlett Grocery Co 6 00 

J. B. Richardson & Sons 72 00 

John F. Saunders. 3 00 

J.J. Stack 29 00 

F. R. Strout 77 00 

J. F. Stearns 86 00 

Union Market 60 00 

S. W. Wiggin 9 00 



Interments : 

To J. W. Brooks 

J. B. Currier 

Peter Davey 

J. W. McKenna 

C. H. Molloy 

J. F. O'Donnell & Sons 

Walter Perham 

John F. Rogers 

Saunders' Undertakers Estab- 
lishment 

John A. Weinbeck 

C. M. Young & Co 



Physicians : 

To Solon Bartlett 

W. A. Johnson 

J. E. Leary 63 00 257 00 



35 


00 


35 


00 


35 


00 


35 


00 


35 


00 


35 


00 


35 


00 


35 


00 


70 00 


70 


00 


140 


00 


173 00 


21 


00 


63 


00 



2,031 86 



560 00 



Amount carried forward $8,992 86 



auditor's report. 171 

SOLDIERS RELIEF— Continued. 
Amount brought forward $8,992 86 

Sundries : 

To City of Lawrence 31 43 

City of Taunton 7 50 

Lowell Hospital Association. . 15 00 

H. M. Potter 24 25 

' 78 18 

9,071 04 
Transferred to General Treasury 

Fund 76 96 

$9,148 00 



TEMPORARY LOANS. 

Balance Jan. 1, 1904 700,000 00 

Borrowed in 1904 1,300,000 00 

$2,000,000 00 



EXPENDITURES. 

To Bond & Goodwin 300,000 00 

First National Bank of Boston, 300,000 00 
Lowell Institution for Savings, 600,000 00 

$1,200,000 00 

Balance to 1905 800,000 00 

$2,000,00 000 

CITY DEBT. 

Appropriation $275,580 50 

Received from Commissioners of 
Funds on Extension of Fort 
Hill Park Sinking Fund 70,210 29 

Received from App. for Water 

Works 21,600 00 

$367,390 79 



172 auditor's report 

CITY DEBT— Continued. 

EXPENDITURES. 

To Commissioners of Sinking 

Funds 2,500 00 

Central Savings Bank 16,220- 00 

Commonwealth of Mass 28,250 00 

City Institution for Savings. . . 7,100 00 

City of Lynn Sinking Fund. . . 7,500 00 

East River Savings Bank 5,000 00 

Leominster Savings Bank 3,000 00 

Lowell Five Cent Savings Ba^nk 520 00 

Lowell Institution for Savings, 188,193 50 
N. E. Mutual Life Insurance 

Co 1,900 00 

Seamans Bank ior Savings .... 17, 500 00 

Sundry Persons 70,210 29 

Washington Savings Institution 5,997 00 

West Side Savings Bank 13,500 00 



INTEREST. 
Appropriation $135,000 00 



EXPENDITURES. 

To Boston Five Cent Savings 

Bank 1,875 00 

Bowery Savings Bank 6,000 00 

Bond & Goodwin 2,859 16 

City Institution for Savings.. . . 1,420 00 

Commonwealth of Mass 2,033 75 

Commissioners of Sinking 

Funds 437 50 

Central Savings Bank. 3,325 62 

East River Savings Institution, 280 00 

E. W. & E. F. Fox 50 00 

N. W. Harris & Co 50 00 

Hospital Aid Society, Keene, 

N. H 20 00 

Leominster Savings Bank 400 00 

Amount carried forward $18,751 03 



$367,390 79 



$135,000 00 



auditor's report. 173 

i 

INTEREST— Continued. 

Amount brought forward $ 18,751 03 

Emma W. Lewis 40 00 

Lowell Five Cent Savings Bank 104 00 

Lowell Institution for Savings, 58,703 08 

Ministry -at-Large 600 00 

N. E. Mutual Life Insurance 

Co 228 00 

N. Y. Savings Bank 2,000 00 

John J. O'Donnell 5 85 

Charles Russell 100 00 

Seamans Bank for Savings . . . 1,850 00 

Trustees Estate Thos. Ncsmith 1,500 00 

Trustees Public Burial Grounds 1,027 74 

Treasurer High St. Church. . . CO 00 

Estate Samuel Watts 120 00 

Mary J. Watts 40 00 

Washington Savings Institution 1,62G 55 

Sundry Persons on bonds ...'.. 30,533 68 

117,289 93 

Transferred to General Treasury 

Fund 17,710 07 



$135,000 00 



SINKING FUND. 
Appropriation $38,300 00 



$38,300 00 



EXPENDITURES. 

Paid Commissioners of Sinking 

Funds 

Water Loan Sinking Fund 16.000 00 

High Service Sinking Fund. . . 1,800 00 

High School Sinking Fund . . . 3.000 00 

New School Houses Sinking 

Fund 7 4,000 00 

Extension Ft. Hill Park Sinking 

Fdnd 6,000 00 

City Flail and Memorial Bld'g 

Sinking Fund 7,500 00 



$38,300 00 



174 auditor's report. 

CARNEY MEDAL FUND. 

Balance Undrawn Jan. 1, 1904 $200 00 

$200 00 

Balance Undrawn Dec. 31st 1904. . . $200 00 

$200 00 

TAXES. 

Received from General Treasury 

Fund Taxes 231 30 

Received from Abatement of Taxes. 104 50 

$335 80 

EXPENDITURES. 

Paid Sundry Persons for taxes over- 
paid 335 80 

$335 80 

EDSON CEMETERY ANNEX. 

Balance undrawn Jan. 1, 1904.. . . 961 01 

$961 01 

EXPENDITURES. 



To Sundry Persons for Labor. . . . 422 64 

Charles T. Fish 50 00 

Margaret Marshall 72 00 

M. Murphy 110 00 

654 64 

Balance carried forward to 1905. . . 306 37 

$961 01 



auditor's report. 175 

CORPORATION TAX. 

Appropriation $46 32 

$46 32 

Paid Commonwealth of Mass 46 32 

$46 32 

NATIONAL BANK TAX. 

Appropriation $11,603 35 

$11,603 35 

Paid Commonwealth of Mass. 

balance 284 55 

Paid Commonwealth of Mass. tax 

of 1904 11,318 80 

$11,603 35 
STATE TAX. 

Appropriation $63,034 43 

$63,034 43 

Paid Commonwealth of Mass. State 

Tax 58,050 00 

Paid Commonwealth of Mass. 

Armory Loan Sinking Fund . . 1,764 29 

Paid Commonwealth of Mass. 

Interest 3,220 14 

$63,034 43 

COUNTY TAX. 

Appropriation $78,478 87 

$78,478 87 

■■■■■■■■■UUH 

Paid County of Middlesex tax of 

1004 78,478 87 

$78,478 87 



176 auditor's report. 

STATE HIGHWAY TAX. 

Appropriation $97 04 

$97 04 

Paid Commonwealth of Mass. tax 

of 1904 97 04 

$97 04 

TAX CASES. 

Balance undrawn Jan. 1, 1904 618 58 

$618 58 

EXPENDITURES. 

To Charles E. Howe 46 00 

William A. Hogan 246 50 

292 50 

Balance to 1905 326 08 

$618 58 

II ■!■ IMII—JMI— i MM— 

BENNETT PORTRAIT. 

Balance undrawn Jan. 1, 1904 300 00 

$300 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

To W. H. Downs 300 00 

$300 00 

GREENHALGE PORTRAIT. 

Balance undrawn Jan. 1, 1904 300 00 

$300 00 

Balance Dec. 31st 1904 300 00 

$300 00 



AUDITORS REPORT. 



177 



BUTLER PORTRAIT. 
Balance undrawn Jan. 1, 1904 300 00 



EXPENDITURES. 



To Walter Oilman Page 300 00 



$300 00 



$300 00 



MEMORIAL DAY, G. A. R. 

Appropriation $1,000 00 

$1,000 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

Music: 

To J. Avison Baker 25 00 

J. H. Jernnotte 24 00 

Lowell Cadet Band 75 00 

Lowell Military Band 75 00 

National Baud 75 00 

Union Musicale Band 75 00 

349 00 

Printing, Painting etc. : 

To A. Jamieson 4 00 

Post 185 G. A. R 3 71 

F. A. M. Tobin 3 75 

Union Printing Co 6 75 

18 21 

Refreshments : 

To Page Catering Co 90 00 

Post 42 G. A. R 27 00 

Post 120 G. A. R 31 02 

Post 185 G. A. R 31 01 

179 03 
Amount carried forward $546 24 



178 



AUDITOR S REPORT. 



MEMORIAL DAY, G. A. R 

Amounts brought forward 

Decorations, Plants etc.: 

To C. L. Marshall 

C. F. Young 

Transportation, Carriage Hire etc, 
To B. & N. St. Ry 

O. P. Davis ,. 

Edward Judge 

D. P. Knowlton 

J. H. Sparks 

Sundries : 

To F. P. Fish 

C. H. Kimball & Co 

F. B. Peabody 

Pevey Bros 

Post 120 G. A. R 

Props. Lowell Cemetery .... 

Shaw Stocking Co 

George E. Worthen 



■Continued. 



$546 24 





98 91 






43 00 








141 91 




16 00 






15 00 






3 50 






5 00 






45 00 








84 50 




90 00 






50 00 






30 00 






35 00 






9 70 




* 


3 00 
7 75 






1 40 


227 35 






$1,000 00 







MEMORIAL DAY, SPANISH WAR VETERANS. 

Appropriation $200 00 

$200 00 



To Mrs. Eleanor Dubuque 
Gen. Butler Associ; 
Lawler Printing Co 
Morse Coach Co . . 
J. J. McManmon . . 
James Walsh ..... 



ue 

ion Band. 


3. 

30 00 

100 00 

16 70 




12 00 




3 00 




38 30 







$200 00 



AUDITOR S REPORT. 



179 



FOURTH OF JULY OBSERVANCE. 

Appropriation $3,000 00 

Receipts from Waverly Hotel 

Overdraft 8 00 



EXPENDITURES. 

Music : 

To American Band 92 00 

Lowell Cadet Band 100 00 

Lowell Military Band 100 00 

National Band 100 00 

Union Musicale Band 100 00 

Fire Works : 

To W. A. Luce 800 00 



To Sundry Persons for Prizes .... 194 00 



$3,008 00 



492 00 



800 00 



194 00 



Firing Salute and Ringing Bells : 

To Lowell Mechanic Phalanx. . . . 
Arthur E. Willman 

Children's Entertainment : 

To William H. Way 

Balloon Ascension : 

To James Allen & Son 

Sundries : 

To App. Sewer Maintenance 

Sundries 

Thomas J. Connors 

Frank M. Dowling 

C. H. Kimball 

A. R. Lopez 

Lowell Gas Light Co 

Amounts carried forward. $233 07 $2,34G 00 



150 00 




10 00 






160 00 


200 00 




200 00 


500 00 




500 00 


112 38 




7 15 




47 80 




44 00 




20 75 


• 


99 





180 auditor's report. 

FOURTH OF JULY, OBSERVANCE— Continued. 

Amounts brought forward $233 07 $2,346 00 

D. L. Page Co 9 00 

Joseph E. Pattee 21 00 

F. O. Prentiss 5 00 

J. H. Sparks 4 00 

Waverley Hotel 16 00 

W. U. Tel. Co 25 

Welch Bros 6 00 

294 32 

Transferred to General Treasury 

Fund 367 68 

$3,008 00 

LABOR DAY. 
Appropriation $1,500 00 



$1,500 00 



Transferred to General Treasury 

Fund $1,500 00 



$1,500 00 



BAND CONCERTS. 
Appropriation . $650 00 



$650 00 



EXPENDITURES, 



To American Band 120 00 

Lowell Cadet Band 120 00 

Lowell Military Baud 120 00 

L'Union Musicale Band 120 00 

National Band 120 00 

Welch Bros 50 00 

$650 00 



auditor's report. 181 

LOWELL TEXTILE SCHOOL. 
Appropriation $8,000 00 

$8,000 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

Paid Trustees Lowell Textile School 8,000 00 

$8,000 00 

CLAIMS FOR DAMAGES, INJURIES, ETC., 
Appropriation $1,239 00 

$1,239 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

To Nathaniel Allen 50 00 

Geneva Boynton 30 00 

Thomas J. Brosnan 200 00 

Catherine Carroll 100 00 

William J. Dresser 40 00 

Celude Druin 25 00 

Peter A. Golden 30 00 

Katherine M. Lawrence 150 00 

JohnMalone 75 00 

Elizabeth Marren 114 00 

Christopher McGrath 250 00 

Jane Ryan 75 00 

Thomas Sayers 50 00 

William H. Wiggin 50 00 

$1,239 00 

> WMllWIWiaiilwul Hill 

FIRE ALAM BOX, COR. AIKEN AVE. AND 
CUMBERLAND ROAD. 

Appropriation $150 00 

$150 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

To W. E. Decrow 150 00 

$150 00 



182 auditor's report 

REPAIRS OF STEAMER 3. 

Appropriation $2,000 00 

$2 t 000 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

To B. & M. R. R 14 25 

Balance to 1905 1,985 75 

$2,000 00 

RICHARDSON BILL. 

Appropriation $5,400 00 

$5,400 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

To George F. Richardson for ser- 
vices 5,400 00 

$5,400 00 

REBATES ON RENT PAID FOR HUNTINGTON HALL. 

Appropriation $420 00 

$420 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

To Bachellor Club 10 00 

Fraternal Order of Eagles 20 00 

James J. Gray 210 00 

Henry J. Keyes 10 00 

Knights of Columbus . 60 00 

Knights of Pythias 10 00 

L. & S. Aid Association . . 10 00 

Lowell Cadet Orchestra 10 00 

Mathew Temperance Institute, 10 00 

Mohair Cricket Club 10 00 

R. C. Paradis 10 00 

J. J. Redmond 10 00 

T. F. Rohan 10 00 

Y. M. C. 1 30 00 

$420 00 



auditor's report. 



183 



TAXES. 

The amount of taxes assessed on the Polls and on the Real 
and Personal Estates within the City of Lowell, for the year 1904, 
was as follows : 



Valuation of and Tax on Real and Personal Property. 



VALUATION. 


RATE. 


TAX. 


Real Estate. . .$56,773,140 00 
Personal Estate . 14, 841, 767 00 


$20 00 per $1,000 
20 00 per 1,000 

Tax on property. 


$1,135,462 80 
296,835 34 


Total valuation $71,614,907 00 


$1,432,298 14 



Number of Polls 25.555 at $2.00 each $51,110 00 

Tax assessed on shares of stock in 

the National Banks of Lowell, • 

held by non-residents and which 

are not included in the City 

valuation 11,239 36 

$1,494,647 50 



184 auditor's report. 



GENERAL TREASURY FUND, TAXES. 

Uncollected Jan. 1, 1904 597,034 41 

Assessment 1904 1,494,047 50 

Appropriated for taxes paid twice. . 231 30 

$2,091,913 21 

Receipts 1,494,770 49 

Abated by Assessors. 23,807 39 

1,518,577 88 

Uncollected Dec. 31, 1904 $573,335 33 



GENERAL TREASURY FUND, LOANS. 

Received from Sundry Persons on 

account of Permanent Loans.. . 254,414 00 

Received from Sundry » Persons on 

account of Temporary Loans. . 1,300,000 00 



$1,544,414 00 



APPROPRIATED. 

Temporary Loans.. 1,300,000^00 

Permanent Loaus 253,953 74 i 

Balance to General Treasury Fund 

Revenue 460 26 

$1,554,414 00 



auditor's report, 185 



GENERAL TREASURY FUND, REVENUE. 

Received into General Treasury 

Fund from Sundry departments 414,539 94 

Transferred from Sundry depart- 
ments 2,550 00 

Transferred from General Treasury 

Fund Loans 460 26 

Balance from Sundry departments. . 32,952 58 

450,502 78 

Balance of Appropriation in excess 

of Receipts 9,705 30 



Total Estimated Revenue 457,658 00 

Transferred to Sundry departments, 2,550 00 



460,208 08 



$460,208 08 



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192 auditor's report. 



COST OF SEWERS LAID IN 1904. 

Avon Street. Southerly from Fifth Ave. , a distance 

of two hundred and eighty-five (285) feet $ 1,029 13 

Avon Street. Northerly from Seventh Ave., a dis- 
tance of eighty (80) feet 156 77 

Beaulieu Street. From West Sixth St., easterly a 

distance of four hundred seventy six (476) feet 3,635 54 

Boisvert Street. From West Sixth Street a distance 

of four hundred and thirty seven feet (437) feet 875 27 

Bridge Street. From Billings Street, southeily a 

distance of one hundred fifty four (154) feet. . . 330 20 

By Street. From Barker Ave. , westerly a distance 

of seven hundred and forty five (745) feet 2,374 60 

Canton Street. — Relaid from Middlesex St., south- 
erly a distance of two hundred twenty four(224) 
feet 413 16 

Colonial Ave. and Plymouth St., From Riverside 
Street, easterly in Colonial Ave., to Plymouth 
Street, and northerly in Plymoutn St., a total 
distance of one thousand (1000) feet 3,933 66 

City Ave., — Relaid From a point near Palmer St., 
westerly a distance of one hundred and thirteen 
(113) feet : . . . . 1,243 73 

Dana Street From Ludlam Street, northerly a dis- 
tance of three hundred forty eight (348feet. . . . 1,138 93 

East Merrimack and Willow Sts., — relaid ; From 
a point near High St., easterly to Willow St.. 
and sovtherly in Willow St., making a total 
distance of six hundred and seven (607) feet. . . $2,003 77 

East Merrimack Street. Outlet, In rear of Mill opp. 

Brown St., twenty eight (28) feet . 288 47 

Eaton Street. From London St., south a distance 

of one hundred and forty eight (148) feet 315 46 

Forrest and Stevens Sts., From Chelmsford St., to 
Stevens, and northerly in Stevens St., making a 
total distance of three thousand six hundred and 
twenty three (3623) feet 37,389 68 

Genoa Ave. Bodwell Ave. and Third Ave., From 
Sarah Ave., easterly to Bodwell Ave., norther- 
ly in Bodwell Ave., to Third Ave., and wester- 
ly in Third Ave., making a total distance of 
one thousand four hundred and thirty five 
(1435) feet 2,754 16 



auditor's report. 193 



COST OF SEWERS LAID IN 1904.— Continued. 

Highland Ave. , From the end of the sewer former- 
ly laid, southerly a distance of six hundred and 
fifty nine (659) feet 1,787 34 

Lipton Street. From Midland St., southerly a dis- 
tance of one hundred and eighty (180) feet... . 394 80 

Middlesex and Wood Sts., From Middlesex St., 
southerly in Wood St, a distance of three hund- 
red and two (302) feet 448 49 

Riverside St. , From White St., northerly a dis- 
tance of nine hundred and eleven (911) feet.. . . 3,223 16 

Saunders &ve., From the end of Sewer formerly 
laid, southerly a distance of five hundred fifty 
six (556) feet 1,469 26 

Short Street. From Manufacturers St., westerly 

three hundred and ten (310) feet 512 39 

Sutherland and Hildreth St., From the end of 
Sewer formerly laid in Sutherland St., westerly 
to Hildreth St., and northerly in Hildreth St., 
making a total distance of two hundred and se- 
venty seven (277) feet 1,080 12 

Staples Street. From Westford St. , southerly a 
distance of two hundred and eighty two (282) 
feet 693 54 

Stevens, West Forrest and Clifford Sts. From Jen- 
ness St., northerly in Stevens St. West Forrest 
St. westerly in West Forrest St. to Clifford St. 
and northerly in Clifford St. milking a total dis- 
tance of one thousand three hundred seventy- 
three (1373) feet 11,151 34 

Stromquist Ave. — unfinished. From the end of the 
sewer in Meadowcroft St. at Lundberg St., 
southerly and westerly to point opposite the ex- 
tension of Stromquist Ave. thence southerly in 
extension of Stromquist Avenue to a point op- 
posite CosgroveSt., a distance of one thous- 
and four hundred twelve (1412) feet 26,606 78 

Westford St. From Pine St. . westerly a distance 

of two hundred seventy (270) feet 1,486 43 

West Sixth St. From Ennell St., easterly a dis- 
tance of four hundred thirteen (413) feet 1,257 67 

Woodcock St. From Gershom Ave., northerly a 

distance of two hundred eighty-one (281) feet. . 957 15 



194 auditor's report. 



COST OF SEWERS LAID IN 1904.— Continued. 

White St. extension, — unfinished. From White 
St. at Riverside St., southeasterly in the bed of 
the Merrimack River and bordering on Colonial 
Ave., a distance of five hundred ninety-five 
(595) feet 6,011 85 

Cost of Sewers in 1904 114,962 85 

Cost of Sewers constructed previous to 1904 2,790,442 99 

Total cost of Sewers to Jan. 1, 1905 2,905,405 84 



AUDITOR S REPORT. 



195 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS AND THEIR VALUATION— 1904. 



City Hall 

Memorial Building 

Police Station ... 

City Scales 

Public Landing and Police Stable. . 

Lands and Building on Fletcher 
Street .... 

Lands and Buildings on Fletcher, 
Cross, Broadway and La- 
grange Streets 

City Farm and Buildings 

Rifle Range 



410,000 00 

200,000 00 

88,000 00 

750 00 

9,500 00 

3,000 00 



100,000 00 

200,000 00 

14,000 00 



1,025,250 00 



FIRE ENGINE HOUSES. 



Branch Street 22,000 00 

Central Street 11,000 00 

Fletcher Street 18,000 00 

Fourth Street 15,000 00 

Gorham Street 27,000 00 

High Street 24,000 00 

Lincoln Street 5,500 00 

Lawrence Street 20,000 00 

Merrimack Street 5,000 00 

Mammoth Road 15,500 00 

Palmer Street 90,000 00 

Westford Street 18,000 00 

Warren Street 11,000 00 



288,000 00 



SCHOOL HOUSES. 



High School , 

High School Annex. . . . 

Bartlett (old) 

Bartlett (new) 

Butler 

Colburn 

Amounts carried forward 



250,000 00 

105,000 00 

25,000 00 

108,000 00 

63,000 00 

25,000 00 



576,000 00 1,313,250 00 



196 



AUDITORS REPORT, 



SCHOOL HOUSES— Continued. 

Amounts brought forward 576,000 00 1,313,250 00 

Edson 25,000 00 

Franklin 25,000 00 

Green r 105,000 00 

Highland 67,000 00 

Lincoln 77,000 00 

Moody (new) 80,000 00 

Moody (old) 20,000 00 

Mann 25,000 00 

Pawtucket 53,000 00 

Varnum 110,000 00 

Primary Schools : 

Oakland 12,000 00 

Powell Street 8,000 00 

Plain Street 21,000 00 

London Street Annex 1,000 00 

London Street 5,000 00 

School Street 7,500 00 

Pond Street 6,000 00 

High Street 9,000 00 

Carter Street 52,000 00 

Fayette Street 3,500 00 

Cross Street 24,000 00 

Billings Street 16,000 00 

Cabot Street 23,500 00 

Middlesex Village (old) 2,000 00 

Middlesex Village (new) 16,000 00 

West Sixth Street 7,000 00 

Mammoth Road 1,500 00 

Lakeview Ave. and Annex. . ..... 9,500 00 

Ames Street 9,500 00 

Tenth Street 9,000 00 

Favor Street 28,000 00 

Cottage Street 4,500 00 

Charles Street 20,000 00 

Training 31,000 00 

Cheever Street 12,000 00 

Chapel Street 4,000 00 

Central Street 13,500 00 

Howard Street 5.000 00 



Amounts carried forward 1,524,000 00 1,313,250 00 



AUDITOR S REPORT, 



197 



SCHOOL HOUSES— Continued. 



Amounts brought forward $1,524,000 00 $1,313,250 00 

Worthen Street 25,000 00 

Lyons Street 20,000 00 

Dover Street 13,500 00 

Morrill School 19,000 00 

Agawam Street 9,000 00 

Grand Street 5,000 00 

Kirk Street 18,000 00 

Weed Street 10,500 00 

Lexington Ave 10,000 00 

Moody Street 20,000 00 

Pine Street 23,000 00 

Lilley Ave 1,000 00 

Highland Annex 3,700 00 

1,701,700 00 

Other Real Estate 

Lot of Land on Chelmsford Street.. 5,000 00 

Lot of Land on Fletcher and 

Bowers Streets 20,000 00 

Lot of Land on Tenth Street 5,000 00 

North Common 100,000 00 

South Common 200,000 00 

Mount Vernon Park 4,350 00 

Belvidere Park 20,000 00 

Wilson Park 200 00 

Rogers Fort Hill Park. 150,000 00 

Tyler Park 8,000 00 

Varnum Park 6,000 00 

Monument Square 15,000 00 

533,550 00 



$3,548,500 00 



198 auditor's report. 



WATER WORKS. 

The Real Estate and Personal Property belonging 
to the City, occupied and used by the Water 
Works $4,375,888 07 

BURIAL GROUNDS OWNED BY THE CITY. 

No. 1 Burial Ground on Schol Street. 
No. 2 Burial Ground on Gorham Street. 
Edson Cemetery on Gorham Street. 



AUDITOR S REPORT. 



199 



PERSONAL PROPERTY OWNED BY THE CITY IN 
CHARGE OF THE SEVERAL DEPARTMENTS. 



Auditor 

City Clerk '. 

City Treasurer 

City Weigher 

City Sealer 

City Messenger 

City Cemeteries 

Clerk of Committees 

Engineering 

Elections 

Fire Department 

Health ... 

Inspector of Milk 

Inspector of Wires 

Law 

Library 

Mayor 

Paupers, Out Door Relief 

Lowell City Hospital and Alms- 
house , 

Police 



Public Buildings 



Parks 

Registrars 

Schools 

Streets 

Sewers 

State Aid 

Supply 

Watering Streets 

Bell and Clock High St. Church 

Lighting 

Boulevard 



50 00 

250 00 

500 00 

250 00 

250 00 

250 00 

1,520 25 

170 50 

3,355 60 

1,150 00 

154,000 00 

10,258 80 

827 99 

655 44 

3,030 35 

70,500 00 

250 00 

4,000 00 

21,525 78 

30,181 02 

12,091 74 

4.821 85 

50 00 

51,368 10 

42,797 97 

22,313 47 

250 00 

530 94 

7,442 00 

1,000 00 

17,000 00 

3,078 65 



$465,720 45 






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REPORT OF THE TREASURER. 201 



ACCOUNT OF CITY TREASURER AND COLLECTOR 
OF TAXES FOR THE YEAR 1904. 



Lowell, Mass., Jan. 1, 1905. 

To the Honorable the City Council : 

Gentlemen : — I have the honor to submit the following report 
of the receipts and expenditures of the City of Lowell for the 
financial year 1904. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ANDREW G. STILES, 
City Treasurer and Collector of Taxes. 






202 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER. 



Andrew G. Stiles, City Treasurer and Collector of Taxes, in 

Dr. To Cash reeeived on account of : 

Cash balance Jan. 1, 1904 $106,476 80 

Engineering 7,755 12 

Fire Department, Sundries 185 33 

Health Office, Sundries 175 70 

Health Yard, Labor 163 75 

Inspector of Wires, Sundries 09 

Parks, Sundries 94 59 

Almshouse, Grain, Groceries and 

Provisions 8,745 36 

Almshouse, Sundries 1,311 00 

Out-Door Relief, General Sundries, 136 20 

Police, Salaries and Labor 1.206 51 

Public Buildings, Carpenters 1,272 81 

Public Buildings, Materials 49 60 

Schools 13 60 

School Houses, Labor 1,120 44 

School Houses, Kalsomining and 

Materials 1,119 01 

Sewers Maintenance, Labor 509 54 

Sewers Maintenance, Sundries 3,208 43 

State Aid 50 00 

Soldiers Relief 48 00 

Streets, Labor 83 10 

Streets, Yard Labor 533 55 

Streets, Sundries 2,318 46 

Watering Streets, Labor 28 00 

Watering Streets, Sundries 1,372 00 

Water Works 197,073 64 

City Debt 91,810 29 

Sewers Construction 16 00 

Fourth of July 8 00 

$487,884 92 



GENERAL TREASURY FUND RECEIPTS. 



City Cemeteries 

Amounts carried forward 



$8,104 75 



$8,104 75 $487,884 92 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER. 



203 



Account with the City of Lowell for the Financial Year 1904. 



By Cash paid on account of 



Cr. 



Abatement of Taxes 

Assessors, Salaries 

Sundries 

Auditor, Salaries 

Sundries 

Care City Hall, Labor 

Police Officer 

Sundries 

City Cemeteries : 

City Clerk, Salaries 

Sundries 

City Treasurer, Salaries 

Sundries 

City Sealer, Salaries 

Sundries 

City Weigher, Salaries 

Sundries 

City Messenger, Salaries 

Sundries 

Lighting 

Clerk Committees, Salaries 

Sundries 

Clerk of Couucil 

Elections . 

Fish Warden 

Pound Keeper 

Engineering 

Fire Department, Salaries 

Sundries 

Health Office, Salaries 

Sundries 

Health Yard, Labor 

Sundries 

Heating City Hall and Memorial 
Buildings, Labor 

Fuel 

Sundries 

Huntington Hall. . . '. 

Rifle Range, Janitor 

Targets 

Amount carried forward. . « 



48,496 


19 




12,534 


13 




1,147 


58 




3,527 


00 




440 


84 




5 325 


00 




1,006 


50 




900 


00 




8,971 


63 




4,628 


00 




1,063 


03 




7,340 


00 




4,022 


85 




350 


00 




66 


65 




800 


00 




]8 


50 




1,200 00 




399 


89 




1,550 


16 




1,200 


00 




140 


85 




300 


00 




13,302 


25 




*40 


00 




: 2 


92 




15,033 


45 




109,854 


23 




24,449 


85 




9,135 


00 




2,621 


26 




28,637 26 




5,048 


43 




2,984 00 




4,300 00 




644 


38 




4,556 


08 




456 


13 




83 


63 






$326,577 67 



204 REPORT OF THE TREASURER. 

Andrew G. Stiles, City Treasurer and Collector of Taxes, in 

Dr. To Cash received on account of : 

Amounts brought forward $8,104 75 $487,884 92 

City Clerk 1,379 77 

City Treasurer 2,993 50 

City Sealer 332 39 

City Weigher. . 175 92 

Fire Department 147 53 

Health 4,004 46 

Huntington Hall 2,063 00 

Inspector Milk 104 50 

Almshouse 5,476 20 

Out-Door Relief 4,893 74 

Police 17,039 63 

Public Buildings 2,407 00 

Schools 6,086 00 

Sewers 135,574 56 

Streets 57,976 26 

State Aid 14,701 00 

Military Aid 2,447 50 

Soldiers Relief . 746 00 

Watering Streets 16,199 37 

Interest 36,206 14 

Temporary Loans 1,300,000 00 

Taxes of 1889 18,032 00 

Taxes of 1900 50 68 

Taxes of 1901 ... 234 61 

Taxes of 1902. 157,664 84 

Taxes of 1903 170,171 45 

Taxes of 1904 ,, 1,148,616 91 

Incidentals 3,500 35 

Corporation Tax 66,415 80 

Liquor Licenses 171,899 00 

Tevvksbury Explosion 780 61 

Heating '. 1,301 93 

City Parks 1,072 00 

Police Underground Wires 2,000 00 

Fire Dept. Underground Wires 2,000 00 

Richardson Bill 5,400 00 

Four - room Building, Highland 

School 2,700 00 

Amounts carried forward $3,370,889 40 $487,884 92 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER. 



205 



Account with the City of Lowell for the Financial Year 1904. 



By cash paid on account of 



Cr. 



Amount brought forward 

Taxes 

Repairs 

Improvements 

Inspector of Animals 

Incidentals 

Insurance 

Inspector of Milk, Salaries 

Sundries 

Inspector of Wires, Salaries 

Sundries 

Law. Salaries 

Sundries 

Lighting Streets 

Public Buildings 

Sundries 

Library 

Liquor Licenses 

Mayor. Salary 

Sundries 

Stenography 

Parks, Salaries and Labor 

Sundries 

Almshouse, Salaries 

Grain, Groceries and Provisions 

Labor 

Sundries 

Out-Door Relief, Salaries 

General Sundries 

Office Sundries 

Police, Salaries and Labor 

Board and Clerk 

Sundries 

Public Buildings, Salaries 

Carpenters, etc 

Janiior Police Station 

Asst. Janitor Police Station. . . 

Janitor Memorial Buildings. . . 

Board of Horses 

Amount carried forward 





$326,577 67 


79 


45 


71 


66 


299 


94 


500 00 


2,573 


61 


5,287 


77 


2,206 


50 


138 


37 


2,128 


00 


737 


74 


4,828 


01 


714 


24 


101,201 


39 


20 


34 


147 


37 


10,000 00 


42,974 


00 


4,200 00 


186 


22 


7 


25 


8,551 


38 


3,544 


48 


2,700 


00 


32,627 


38 


12,618 


48 


23,675 


17 


3,785 


00 


48,496 


15 


825 


86 


132,482 


13 


5,000 00 


7,099 


34 


2,268 


00 


8,239 


00 


912 


50 


818 


97 


702 


00 


1,264 


94 




$806,490 31 



206 REPORT OF THE TREASURER. 

Andrew G. Stiles, City Treasurer and Collector of Taxes in 

Dr. To Cash recevied on account of : 

Amounts brought forward $3,370,899 40 $487,884 92 

Bath Room F. & B. St. Engine 

House . . . 800 00 

Bath Room Fourth St. Engine 

House GOO 00 

Sanitary Imp. Sundry Schools 600 00 

Repairs Steamer 3 2,000 00 

Excise Tax 7,166 26 

National Bank Tax 8.605 70 

State Tax 1,200 00 

Street Railway Tax. 7,834 57 

School Houses 4 50 

Claims and Damages 1,014 00 

Carbage Cremator 10,000 00 

Additional Dept. Appropriations... 53,000 00 

3,463,724 43 

$3,951,609 35 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER. 



207 



Account with the City of Lowell for the Financial Year 1904. 
By cash paid on account of Cr 



Amounts brought forward 

Work not done by Dept 5,087 16 

Materials 4,043 52 

Electric Power at Shop 254 76 

Repairing Boiler at City Hall. . 1,499 98 
Repairing Palmer St. Engine 

House 1,500 00 

New Boiler Branch St. Engine 

House . 499 98 

Almshouse Repairs 2,499 81 

Painting City Hall 278 55 

Registrars, Salaries and Labor 3,201 25 

Sundries 824 26 

Schools 299,532 79 

School Houses, Labor 11,580 19 

Janitors 40,606 73 

Kalsomining, Materials, etc. . . 11,590 02 
Repairing Fuller & Warren 

Furnaces 980 52 

New Boiler Lyon St. School. . 500 00 

New Boiler Training School. . 499 97 

New Chimney Highland School 125 00 

Concrete School Basements. . . 200 00 

Sewers Maintenance, Salaries 2,896 27 

Labor 12,451 57 

Sundries 11,767 06 

State Aid, Salaries and Sundries ... 2, 107 14 

Military Aid 3,931 00 

Soldiers Relief 9,071 04 

Streets, Salaries 4,000 00 

Labor • 131,589 46 

Yard Labor 11,501 94 

Sundries 53,503 58 

Sidewalk Repairs 4,999 20 

. New Sidewalks 8,405 40 

Supply. Salaries 5. 444 58 

Sundries 922 63 

Watering Streets, Labor 5,011 71 

Sundries 11,844 06 

Amounts carried forward 



$806,490 31 



$1,471,301 44 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER. 



209 



Andrew G. Stiles, City Treasurer and Collector of Taxes, in 
Account with the City of Lowell for the Financial Year 1904. 



By cash paid on account of : 

Amount brought forward 

State Aid, Aid 14,937 50 

Taxes Cases 292 50 

Water Works 181,298 24 

City Debt 367,390 79 

Interest 117,289 93 

Temporary Loans 1,200,000 00 

Sinking Funds 38,300 00 

Corporation Tax 46 32 

County Tax 78,478 87 

State Tax 63,034 43 

National Bank Tax 11,603 35 

State Supervisors 824 00 

Taxes 335 80 

Edson Cemetery Annex 654 64 

Laying out By Street 2.483 13 

Sewers Construction 115,989 42 

Health, Small Pox 1,010 02 

Memorial Day G. A. R 1,000 00 

" S. W. V 200 00 

Parks, Care of Trees 999 99 

Lowell Textile School 8,000 00 

Fourth of July 2,640 32 

Band Concerts 650 00 

Claim for Damages 1,239 00 

Bennett Portrait 300 00 

Police Underground Wires 1,272 81 

Fire Dept. Underground Wires. . . . 1,311 67 

Four-room Bldg. Highland School, 2,699 57 
Improvement Sanitary Condition 

Colburn School 1,999 82 

Sanitary Improvem't Sundry Schools 599 90 

Richardson Bill 5,400 00 

Fire Alarm Box, Aiken Ave 150 00 

Bath Room 4th St. Engine House.. 599 84 
Bath Room Fletcher and Branch 

St, Engine House 800 00 

Repairs of Steamer 3 14 25 

Amount carried forward 



Cr. 

$1,471,301 44 



$3,695,148 40 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER. 211 

Andrew G. Stiles, City Treasurer and Collector of Taxes, in 
Account with the City of Lowell for the Financial Year 1904. 

By cash paid on account of : Cr. 

Amount brought forward $3,695,148 40 

Butler Portrait 300 00 

Middlesex Village School Bell 307 88 

Rebates Huntington Hall 420 00 

State Highway Tax 97 04 

3,696,273 32 

Cash balance Dec. 31, 1904 • 255,336 03 

$3,951,609 35 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS OF THE SINKING 
FUNDS FOR THE YEAR 1904. 



Lowell, Mass., Jan. 2, 1905. 

To the Honorable the City Council of Lowell : 

Gentlemen : — The Commissioners of Sinking Funds of the 
City of Lowell have the honor to submit the following report of 
the several Sinking Funds of said City and of the Hapgood Wright 
Centennial Trust Fund, for the year 1904. 



Full value of all Sinking Funds Jan. 1, 1905 $650,447 62 

Full value of all Sinking Funds Jan. 1, 1904 659,215 25 

Decrease during the year 1904 $8,767 63 



Value of Water Loan Sinking Funds Jan. 1, 1905, $406,430 22 
Value of Water Loan Sinking Fnnds Jan. 1, 1904, 373 505 74 

Increase during the year 1904 $32,924 48 



Value of all other Sinking Funds Jan. 1, 1905 $244,017 40 

Value of all other Sinking Funds Jan. 1, 1904 . . . 285,709 51 
Decrease during the year 1904 $41,692 11 



Total decrease as above $8,767 63 



REPORT OF THE COMMISIONERS OF SINKING FUNDS. 213 



Value of the Hapgood Wright Centennial Trust 

Fund Jan. 1, 1905 $3,208 93 

Value of the Hapgood Wright Centennial Trust 

Fund Jan. 1, 1904 3,143 24 

Increase during the year $125 69 



During the year the Extension of Rogers Fort Hill Park 
Sinking Fund has been closed. 

A statement of the receipts, payments and present yalue of the 
several Sinking Funds and a list of the securities in each fund 
follows : 



214 REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS OF SINKING FUNDS, 



Water Loan Sinking Fund. 



On hand Jan. 1, 1904 

Received during 1904: 
Cash — Annual Appropriation 

Income on Investments 

Income on Bank Deposits 

Securities matured or sold 

Securities bought in 1904 

Paid for Securities in 1904 

On hand Jan. 1, 1905 

Increase du ring 1904 

Securities belonging to this fund: 

3 City of Springfield coupon bonds, 6 per cent.. 

4 City of Lewiston coupon bonds, 5 per cent . . . 

10 Town of Sharon coupon bonds, 4 per cent 

12 Town ofjAthol coupon bonds, 4 per cent 

15 City of Portsmouth coupon bonds, 4 per cent. 
14 City of Waterville coupon bonds, 4 per cent.. 

14 City of Saginaw coupon bonds, 4 per cent — 
4 City of Everett registered bonds, 4 per cent.. 
1 City of Boston registered bonds, 4 per cent 

1 City of Lowell registered bonds, 3>£ per cent.. 

15 Fitchburg R. R. coupon bonds, 4 per cent 

a C. B. & Q. Neb. Ext. R. R. coupon bonds, 4 per 
cent 

4 Illinois Central K. R. coupon bonds, 4 per cent. 

18 Portland & Odgensburg R. R. coupon bonds, 
5 per cent. 

PJBoston & Maine A. R. registered bonds, \% 
per cent 

30 Northwestern Union R. R. coupon bond , 
7 per cent 

9 New York, Lackawanna & Western R. R. cou- 
pon bonds, 6 per cent 

48 Town of Northfield coupon bonds, 3% per cent. 

3 Boston & Maine R. R. coupon bonds, 4 per 
cent 

50 Lowell & Suburban St. R. R. coupon bonds, 
5 per cent 

2 St. Johnsbury & Lake Champlain coupon 

bonds, 5 per cent 

1 Town of Delivers coupon bonds, 4 per cent 

15 Lynn & Boston St. R. R. coupon bonds, 5 per 

cent 

20 Illinois Central R. R. coupon bonds, 3>£ per 

cent... .. 

Cash on deposit in Appleton National Bank 



Securi- 
ties. 


Cash. 


Total. 


$307,500 00 


$ 9,835 14 

$ 16,000 00 

13,777 50 

470 01 


$317,335 14 


40,000 00 


6,500 00 






46,582 65 






41,377 22 
$ 5,205 43 




$34 1,000 00 


$346,205 43 






$ 28,870 29 


$ 3,000 00 




4,000 00 






10,000 00 






12,000 00 






15,000 00 






14,000 00 






14,000 00 






4,000 00 






61,000 00 






10,000 00 






15,000 00 






8,000 00 
4,000 00 






18,000 00 






10,000 00 






15,000 00 






9,000 00 
24,000 00 






3,000 00 






50,000 09 






2,000 00 
1,000 00 






15,000 00 






20,000 00 




341,000 00 










5,205 43 






$346,205 43 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS OF SINKING FUNDS. 215 



High Service Water Loan Sinking Fund. 


Securi- 
ties. 


Cash. 


Total. 




$50,000 00 


$6,170 CO 


$56,170 60 


Received during 1904 : 












1,800 00 








2,600 00 

108 77 










10,000 00 


1,000 00 








• 




11,679 37 
10,454 58 

$1,224 79 






$59,000 00 


$60,224 79 






Increase during the year 1904 




$4,654 19 




Securities belongiug to this fund: 






$ 2,000 00 






1 City of Cambridge coupon bonds, G per cent.. . 


1,000 00 






4 Town of Denvers coupon bonds, 5 per cent 


4,000 00 






1 Town of Rockport coupon bonds, 4 per cent. . 


1,000 00 






1 City of Portsmouth coupon bonds, 4 per cent.. 


1,000 00 






4 City of Saginaw coupon bonds, 4 per cent 


4,000 00 


w 




4 C. B. & Q. Neb. Ext. R. R. coupon bonds, 4 per 


4,000 00 

20,000 00 

4,000 00 

7,ooo;oo 
2,ooo;oo 

1,000 00 
1,000 00 
2,000 00 






1 City of Lynn registered bonds, 4 per cent... . 






4 Portland & Odgensbury R. R. coupon bonds, 






7 Winona & St. Peter R. R. coupon bonds, 7 per 






2 New York, Lackawanna & Western R. R. cou- 
pon bonds, 6 per cent 




1 Boston & Maine R. R. coupon bonds, 4 per 




1 Winona & St. Peter R, R. coupon bond, 7 per 




2 Lowell & Suburban St. R. R. coupon bonds, 




5 N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. coupon bonds, 4 per 






5,000 00 






Cash on deposit in Appleton National Bank. 






59,000 00 

1,224 79 

$60,224 79 







21G REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS OF SINKING FUNDS. 



Lowell High School Sinking Fund. 

On hand Jan. 1, 1904 . 

Received during 1904: 
Cash — Annual Appropriation 

Income on Investments 

Income on Bank Deposits 

Securities matured. 

Securities bought in 1904 

Paid for Securities in 1904 

On hand Jan. 1, 1905 

Increase during 1904 

Securities belonging to this Fund : 
I City of Keene coupon bonds, 4 per cent 

1 City of Lynn coupon bonds. 5 per cent 

12 City of Taunton coupon bonds, 4 per cent 

7 City of Portsmouth couponibonds, 4 per cent.. 
5 City of Indianapolis coupon bonds, 4 per cent. 

4 Fitchburg R. R. coupon bonds, 4 per cent 

5 C. B. & Q, Neb. Ext. R. R. coupon bonds, 4 per 

cent 

7 Illinois Central R. R. coupon bonds, 4 per 
cent 

2 City of Saginaw coupon bond, 4 per cent.. . 

1 Boston & Maine R. R. coupon bonds, 4 per 
cent 

5 N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. coupon bonds, 4 per 
JV _. cent 

1 New York, Lakawanna & Western R. R. cou- 
pon bonds, 6 per cent 

Cash deposit in Appleton National Bank 



Securi- 
ties 



$41,710 29 



10,000 00 



$50,500 00 



500 00 
1,000 00 
12,000 00 
7,000 00 
5,000 00 
4,000 00 

5,000 00 

7,000 00 
2,000 00 

1,000 00 

5,000 00 

1,000 00 



Cash. 



$5,416 12 

3,000 00 

1,883 68 

65 86 

1,210 29 



$11,575 95 
10,454 58 



$1,121 37 



Tor a l. 



$47,126 41 



$51,621 37 
$4,494 96 



50,500 00 

1,121 37 

$51,621 37 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS OF SINKING FUNDS. 217 



Extension of Rogers Fort Hill Park Fund. 

On hand Jan. 1, 1904 

Received during 1904: 
Cash— Annu 1 Appropriation 

Income on Investments 

Income on Bank Deposits 

Securities sold or matured and paid. 

Paid during 1904 : 
Cash— City of Lowell to close Sinking Fund. ... 
Securities sold or charged off , 

Decrease during 1904 



Securi- 
ties. 



$43,000 00 



$43,000 00 



Cash. 



$20,792 58 

6,000 00 

200 00 

242 99 

42,974 72 



$70,210 29 
70,210 29 



Total. 



$63,792 58 



33,792 58 



218 REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS OF SINKING FUNDS. 



New School Houses Sinking Fund. 

On band Jan. 1, 1804 

Received during 1904: 
Cash— Annual Appropriation 

Income on Investments 

Income on Bank Deposits 

Securities bought in 1904 

Paid for Securities in 1904 

On hand Jan. 1, 1905 

Increase during 1904 

Securities belonging to this Fund: 
8 City of Indianapolis coupon bonds, 4 per cent. 

3 C. B. & Q. Neb Ext. R. R. coupon bonds, 4 per 

cent 

5 Illinois Central R. R. coupon bonds, 4 per cent 

2 Winona & St. Peter R. R. coupon bonds, 7 per 
cent. 

1 New York, Lackawanna & Western R. R. cou- 
pon bonds, G per cent 

5 City of Lynn registered bonds, 4 per cent , 

4 Boston & Maine R. R. coupon bonds, 4 per 

cent 

5 N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. coupon bonds, 4 per 

cent 

Cash on deposit in Appleton National Bank 



Securi- 
ties. 



$23,000 00 



10,000 00 



$153,000 00 



$8,000 00 

3,000 00 
5,000 00 

2,000 00 

1,000 00 
5,000 00 

4,000 00 

5,000 00 



Cash. 



$5,030 24 

4,000 00 

1,100 00 

73 40 



$10,803 G4 
10.454 58 

$349 00 



Total. 



$28,030 24 



$33,349 00 

$4,718 82 



33,000 00 

349 00 

$33,34y 06 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS OF SINKING FUNDS. 219 



City Hall and Memorial Building Sinking Fund. 



On hand Jan. 1, 1904 

Received during 1904: , 
Cash— Annual Appropriation . . . 

Income on Investments... 

Income on Bank Deposits. 

Securities matured 

Securities bought in 1904 



Paid for Securities in 1904 . . . 

On hand Jan. 1, 1905 

Increase during the year 1904. 



Securities belonging to this Fund; 

4 Town of Bradford coupon bonds, 4 per cent. .. 

5 City of Brockton coupon bonds, 4 per cent 

1 Town of Reading coupon bonds, 4 per cent 

6 Town of Wrentham coupon bonds, 4 per cent. 

9 Town of Arlington coupon bonds, 4 per cens.. 

8 Town of Stoughton coupon bonds, 4 per cent.. 

7 City of Saginaw coupon bonds, 4 per cent 

6 BTtchburg R. R. coupon bonds, 4 per cent 

1 City of Boston registered bonds, 4 per cent.... 

1 City of Brockton registered bonds 4 per cent.. 

10 C. B. & Q. Neb. Ext. R. R. coupon bonds, 4 

percent 

19 Illinois Central R. R. coupon bonds, 4 per 
cent 

2 Milwaukee & Lake Shore R. R. coupon bonds, 

5 per cent 

7 N. Y. Lack. & Western R. R. coupon bonds, G 

percent 

7 City of Indianapolis coupon bonds, 4 percent. 
1 City of Brockton registered bonds, 4 per cent. 

9 Town of Northfield coupon bonds, 'i% per cent 

11 Winona & St. Peter R. R. coupon bonds 7 per 

cent 

6 City of Maiden coupon bonds, 4 per cent 

5 Lynn & Boston St. R. R. coupon bonds, 5 per 

cent 

5 N. Y. N. H. & H. R. R. coupon Bonds, 4 per 

cent 

5 Illinois Central R. R. coupon bonds, 'dy„ per 

cent 

7 City of Portsmouth coupon bonds, 4 per cent. 

Cash on deposit in Appleton National Bank 



Securi- 
ties. 

$125,000 00 



36,000 00 



•1157,500 00 



$ 4,000 00 


5,000 00 


1,000 00 


0,000 00 


9,000 00 


8,000 00 


7,000 00 


0,000 00 


21,000 00 


1.000 00 


10,000 00 


19,000 00 


2,000 00 


7,000 00 


7,000 00 


1,000 00 


4,500 00 


11,000 00 


0,000 00 


5,000 00 


5,000 00 


5,000 00 


7,000 00 



Cash. 



$21,100 28 

7,500 00 

0,218 32 

160 03 

3,500 00 



^38,538 63 
36,991 96 



1,546 97 



TOTA L. 



$146,160 28 



$159,046 97 

$12,886 69 



157,500 00 

1,546 97 

$159,046 97 



220 REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS OF SINKING FUNDS. 



Hapgood Wright Centennial Trust Fund. 

On hand Jan. 1, 1904 

Received during 1904: 

Cash— Interest on Bank Deposits 

On hand Jan. 1, 1905 . 

Increase during the year 

Securities belonging to this Fund: 
Cash deposited in Lowell Institution for Savings 
Cash deposited in City Institution for Savings.. 



Secubi- 

TIES. 



Cash. 



3,143 24 



125 69 



G63 06 
2,606 87 



Total. 



$3,143 24 



3,268 93 
$3,268 93 



$125 69 



3,268 93 
$3,268 93 



Respectfully submitted, 

AUSTIN K. CHADWICK, 

FRED A. BUTTRICK, 

CHARLES L. KNAPP, 

Commissioners of Sinking Funds for the City of Lowell for the 
year 1904. 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER. 



221 



STATEMENT OF THE CITY TREASURER RELATING 

TO SPECIAL FUNDS FOR CARE OF PUBLIC 

BURIAL GROUNDS. 



Lowell, Mass., Jan. 2, 1905. 

To the Honorable the City Council of the City of Lowell : 

Gentlemen : — I have the honor to submit the following state- 
ment of special funds in my hands, deposited for perpetual care of 
lots in the Public Burial Grounds of the City of Lowell : 

On hand Jan. 1, 1904 $33,225 00 

Received during the year : 

From Elizabeth C. Kennedy 150 00 

John W. Pead, Adm 100 00 

Alonzo J. Page 100 00 

Thomas Smith 100 00 

Betsey A. Perry 100 00 

Sarah Head 100 00 

Mrs. Daniel G. Wilson 100 00 

" " " " 100 00 

Annie F. Coffey 100 00 

Annie S. Harlow 100 00 

Sally P. Robinson 100 00 

May E. Chase •. . . 100 00 

Sarah E. Isherwood 100 00 

Geo. C. Blanchard 100 00 

Mrs. R. H. Blake 100 00 

Geo. W. Brothers 100 00 

John J. Humphrey 100 00 

Thomas England 100 00 

O. W. Waller 100 00 

Mary E. Offutt 100 00 

John L. Robertson 100 00 

Mary E. Offutt 100 00 

Mrs. P. A. Morgan 100 00 



222 REPORT OF THE TREASURER. 

STATEMENT OF THE CITY TREASURER RELATING 

TO SPECIAL FUNDS FOR CARE OF BURIAL 

GROUNDS— Continued. 



Angenette D. Clarke 100 00 

Lester L. Wells 100 00 

James Fife 100 00 

Malcolm Currie \ . . : 100 00 

Jonas Whatmough 100 00 

May A. Adams 100 00 

O. A. Court 100 00 

Agnes Carmes 100 00 

Mabel E. Mitchell 100 00 

Clara M. Dry den 100 00 

Andrew Moffatt 100 00 

Clarendon Goodwin 100 00 

J. B. Currier . 300 00 

" " 100 00 

Joel M. Scoble 100 00 

Chas. A. Wotton for Mrs. Hugh Boyd 100 00 

James R. Fulton 100 00 

Hattie Crowfoot 100 00 

J. A. Weinbeck for Morton E. Bean ... 100 00 

Horace C. Page, Executor 100 00 

James F. Stearns 100 00 

" " " 100 

Cora M. Pulsifer 100 00 

Alden I. Gifford 100 00 

Phoebe Rotheray 100 00 

Jos. E. Shepard, Executor 400 00 

Sarah A. Bramhall 100 00 

P. N. Giles 100 00 

Mrs. Jane Stevens 100 00 

Isabell Langley 100 00 

Ann V. Wallace 100 00 

Hannah Taylor • . . . . 100 00 

$39,275 00 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER. 223 

\ 

STATEMENT OF THE CITY TREASURER RELATING 

TO SPECIAL FUNDS FOR CARE OF BURIAL 

GROUNDS— Continued. 

The following amount is invested as follows : 

Washington Savings Institution $5,000 00 

City Institution for Savings 5,400 00 

Lowell Five Cent Savings Bank. 5,025 00 

Savings Dept. Traders National Bank 4,050 Q0 

Merrimack River Savings. ... . 4,500 00 

Mechanics Savings Bank 5,100 00 

Lowell Institution for Savings 5,100 00 

Central Savings Bank 5,100 00 



$39,275 00 
Respectfully submitted, 

ANDREW G. STILES, 
City Treasurer and Collector of Taxes. 



INDEX. 



Abatement of Taxes 20 

Account of City Treasurer and Collector of Taxes 201 

Almshouse Repairs 12] 

Assessors 21 

Auditor 23 

Balance Sheet of Assets and Liabilities Dec. 31, 1904. 200 

Band Concerts 180 

Bath Rooms at Branch and Fletcher St. Engine Houses 123 

Bath Room, Closets and New Floor at 4th St. Engine House 123 

Bennett Portrait 176 

Burial Grounds Owned by the City 198 

Butler Portrait 177 

By Street, Laying Out, Grading and Extending 157 

Care of City Hall. 41 

Carney Medal Fund 174 

City Cemeteries 43 

City Clerk 24 

City Debt 171 

City Messenger 28 

City Sealer 32 

City Treasurer 26 

City Weigher and Measurer 33 

Claims for Damages, Injuries, etc 181 

Clerk of Common Council 30 

Clerk of Committees 30 

Concrete Chapel Cheever and Cottage St. School Basement. . 139 

Corporation Tax 175 

Cost of Sewers Laid in 1904 192 

County Tax 175 

Due from City on Ordinary City Debt -. . . 187 

Due from City on Water Loan 186 

Edson Cemetery Annex 174 

Elections 46 



INDEX. 225 



Engineering 50 

Fire Department 51 

Fire Department Underground Wires 59 

Fish Warden 33 

Fire Alarm Box Cor. Aiken Ave. and Cumberland Road. . . . 181 

Fourth of July Observance 179 

General Treasury Fund 184 

Greenhalge Portrait 176 

Health Cremator Construction 67 

Health Office Salaries ... 59 

Health Yard Labor 63 

Health Yard Sundries 63 

Health Small Pox 66 

Heating City Hall and Memorial Building 68 

Huntington Hall •. . . 70 

Improving Sanitary Conditions at Colburn School 140 

Incidentals 74 

Inspector of Animals and Provisions 33 

Inspector of Milk, Vinegar, etc 34 

Inspector of Wires ... 35 

Insurance ... 75 

Interest , 172 

Labor Day 180 

Law 76 

Lowell City Hospital and Almshouse 85 

Library 78 

Lighting New Lights 80 

Liquor License 80 

Lighting 78 

Lowell Textile School 178 

Mayor's Department 37 

Memorial Day G. A. R. . . 177 

Middlesex Village School Bell 143 

Memorial Day Spanish War Veterans 178 

Military Aid '. 169 

National Bank Tax 175 

New Chimney at Highland School 138 

New Boiler Branch St. Engine House 120 



226 INDEX. 



New Building to Relieve Highland School ... 141 

New, Boiler at Lyon St. School 139 

New Boiler at Training School 139 

Parks 80 

Parks, Care of Trees 84 

Parks, Moths 85 

Police Underground Wires 110 

Painting City Hall 120 

Paupers, Out-Door Relief 95 

Personal Property Owned by the City 199 

Police 105 

Pound Keeper 32 

Public Buildings Ill 

Public Buildings, Valuation of 195 

Registrars 39 

Repairing Fuller & Warren Furnaces in Various School 140 

Repairs of Steamer 3 182 

Richardson Bill ' 182 

Rebates on Rent paid for Huntington Hall 182 

Resetting and Repairing Boiler at City Hall 121 

Repairing Palmer St. Engine House 119 

Report of the Commissioners of Sinking Funds 212 

Rifle Range 71 

Sanitaries in Schools etc. 142 

Schools 124 

School Houses 134 

Sewer Construction j . . . . 147 

Sewer Maintenance 143 

New Sidewalks 156 

Sidewalk Repairs 156 

Sinking Funds 173 

Soldiers' Relief 169 

State Aid 168 

Statement of City Treasurer Relating to Sinking Funds for 

Care of Public Burial Grounds 221 

State Supervisors 49 

State Tax 175 

State Highway Tax 176 



INDEX. 227 



Streets 149 

Supply Department 159 

Taxes 174 183 

Tax Cases 176 

Tax Rate 183 

Temporary Loans 171 

Watering Streets 157 

Water Works . 161 

Water Works, Real Estate and Personal Property 198 



THIRTY -SECOND 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



ILouell ^ater BSoarii 



TO THE 



City Council of the City of Lowell, Mass. 



AND THE 



Reports of the Superintendent of Water Works 

and of the City Engineer to the 

Water Board for 1904 



LOWELL, MASS. : 

BUTTERFIELD PRINTING COMPANY 
J 905 



WATER DEPARTMENT, 1904 



WATER BOARD 

ROBERT J. CROWLEY, President. 

Term expires second Monday in March, 1907. 

MICHAEL J. DOWD. 

Term expires second Monday in March, 1905. 

AUGUST FELS. 

Term expires second Monday in March, 1906. 

FRANK L. WEAVER. 

Term expires second Monday in March, 1908. 

JOHN W. CRAWFORD, Secretary and Clerk. 



ROBERT J. THOMAS, Superintendent. 
GEORGE BOWERS, City Engineer. 



D. B. H. BARTLETT, Engineer. WILLIAM JOYCE, Assistant Foreman. 

THOMAS McLOUGHLIN, Engineer. JOHN E. LOWNEY, Meter Inspector. 

JOHN B. HENRY, Keeper Reservoir. ALBERT HALLOWELL, Foreman Shop. 

THOMAS F. DOYLE, Foreman. A. F. COGER, Hydrants and Gates. 

EDWARD WALSH, Services. 



OFFICE 

GEORGE E. WORTHEN, Service Clerk. GERTRUDE W. BYAM, Bookkeeper. 

JULIA J. RAFTER, Assistant Bookkeeper. 
ALICE T. MCCARTHY, Assistant Bookkeeper. 



INSPECTORS 



ROBERT GARDNER. MICHAEL H. McCUE. 

FREDERICK A. BARON. GEORGE F. TILTON. 

WALTER P. WILEY. 



CITY OF LOWELL 



In Board of Aldermen. 
Feb. 14, 1905. 

Received and ordered on file. Sent down for 
concurrence. 

GIRARD P. DADMAN, 

City Clerk. 



In Common Council, 
Feb, 21, 1905 

Received and ordered on file, in concurrence. 

FRANK M. DOWLING, 

Clerk. 



Report of the Water Board 



Office of the Water Board, 
City Hall. 

Lowell, Mass., January 2, 1905. 

To His Honor the Mayor and the City Council of the 
City of Lowell : 

Herewith is presented the thirty-second annual 
report of the Water Board for the year ending Decem- 
ber 31, 1904. The report of the Superintendent here- 
with, covering the same period, contains the details of 
the work of the department, and renders an extended 
report from this Board unnecessary. 

The personnel of the Board remained the same, 
as Mr. Weaver, whose time expired, was re-elected by 
the City Council ; but at the organization of the Board 
for the year, Mr. Robert J. Crowley was elected Presi- 
dent of the Board, and Mr. Weaver retired from that 
office after a service of seven years. 

The grounds and lands under the control of the 
Board have received the usual care, the land yields 
hay enough to supply the department and allow a con- 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 



siderable amount to be sold. Problems are constantly 
coming up which must be solved and conditions change, 
but it is the aim of the Board to keep the plant in the 
highest state of efficiency, and also to look as far into 
the future as possible. 

It has been the policy of the Board to make ex- 
tensions so far as the means at its disposal would permit 
where most needed and where the revenue in sight 
would pay a fair interest on the amount expended. 

The financial showing for the year is most satisfac- 
tory. Total receipts were $197,073.64, an increase of 
946.44 over previous year, and expenditures were 
$181,298.24, a decrease of $18,934.23. The balance 
January 1st, 1905, was $18,835.32, an increase of 
$15,775.40 over the year before. Owing to the thirty 
days limit on the 10 per cent, discount on bills for water, 
it is essential for the bills to bear the date of issue and 
to issue at stated times, so the quarterly bills are dated 
April 1 st, July 1st, October 1st, and January 1st, instead 
of the March, June, September and December accounts 
as formerly ; consequently, what would have been the 
December Account for 1904 becomes the January 
Account of 1905 and does not show in this report, but 
using the total of this account, the charges for metered 
water increased $8,905.63 and rated water charges de- 
creased $2,481.63. 

The changing from rates to meters is gradually 
going on, 277 new meters being set this year while only 
178 new services were put in, not all of which were 
metered. 

The final payment of $5,000.00 was made on the 
second Driven Well loan of 1894 for $50,000.00. The 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 



debt of the Department was reduced $21,600.00, leaving 
total debt January 1st, 1905, $1,183,900.00, of which 
$1,075,000.00 is bonds and $87,300.00 is notes. 

In February requisition was made through the 
Supply Department for one hundred tons of 6" pipe, 
which was purchased from the Lynchburg Foundry Co. 
for $23.20 per net ton. 

May 17th, requisition was made for three thousand 
tons of soft coal, either Pocahontas, New River Steam, 
Loyal Hanna or Old Maryland Co.'s ; the contract was 
awarded Lowell Coal Co. for New River Steam Coal 
at $4.55 per ton at Centralville, and $4.75 per ton at 
Boulevard. 

On November 17th, a proposition was received 
from the Power Specialty Co. to furnish a Foster Super- 
heater, to be installed on boiler at Centralville Station, 
they guaranteeing a saving of fuel of 9 per cent, in the 
operation of the H. D. Worthington Engine when in 
good order, on sixty days trial, for the price of $1050.00 
at factory. This proposition was accepted and contract 
was signed and approved by the Mayor, December 31st. 

In accordance with the rules adopted last year 
governing the use and care of private fire services, it 
seemed advisable to have a close inspection of the 
property where there are such services, that the rules 
shall be strictly adhered to, and Inspector Gardner was 
appointed to that duty to have all private fire services 
under supervision, to keep them sealed and learn when 
used and for what purpose. The city was also divided 
into four districts and the other four inspectors were 
detailed one to each district to read meters, make pick- 
up charges, deliver bills and look after the use of water 



IO REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 

in his particular district. At the quarterly readings four 
other employees are detailed to assist these four inspec- 
tors that the meters may be read in the shortest time 
and the bills issued with as little delay as possible ; and 
to do this another clerk was installed in the office, Miss 
Alice T. McCarthy being selected from the civil service 
list for that position. 

There being considerable controversy among water 
works people, insurance men and mill officials as to the 
efficiency of fire services when metered, the Superin- 
tendent was authorized to install a suitable plant at 
Centralville Pumping Station for the testing of large 
meters and other devices for use on fire services, and on 
October 5th and 6th a public test of these appliances 
was held at which a large number of prominent water 
works, insurance and mill officials, together with repre- 
sentatives of a number of meter manufacturers were 
present, and showed much interest in the device and the 
results obtained. Superintendent Thomas and Engineer 
Sullivan received a great deal of praise from those 
present for their work in this matter. 

This Board recommends that the land on the Boule- 
vard under the jurisdiction of the Street Department, on 
which are the wells of the Lower Boulevard Pumping 
Station, shall be turned over to the care of the Water 
Department ; the Water Department owns the land 
adjoining on which the Pumping Station stands and 
should have full control of that where the wells are. 

It will soon become necessary to install new pump- 
ing machinery at Centralville Station, as the economical 
usefulness of the pumps there is about over. The Morris 
engine of 1873, the Worthington Duplex of 1876, and 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. II 



the Worthington , High Duty of 1891 when run are in 
continual need of repairs and cannot be depended upon 
for constant work. In the great advance in the manu- 
facture of machinery for the pumping of water, it will 
be economy for the city to install a new pump in the 
near future, as well as a measure of safety, - 

On December 6th, 1904, occurred the death of In- 
spector Michael H. McCue after a long and painful 
illness, who had been employed in this Department since 
1892. The department thus loses the services of a 
faithful and trustworthy employee. The vacancy thus 
created was filled by the election of Mr. John E. Lowney. 

The statistics of the Secretary and of the City 
Engineer in their respective reports will be found of 



interest. 



ROBERT J. CROWLEY. 
MICHAEL J. DOWD. 
FRANK L. WEAVER. 
AUGUST FELS. 



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IV. 


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1 6 REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 



TABLE V. 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT — LOWELL WATER WORKS, 

1904. 

Sub-division "Water Works Supplies," from Table II. 



Pumping Station Supplies, Central ville Station $1,441 72 

Pumping Station Supplies, Cook plant ' . 393 76 

Pumping Station Supplies, Boulevard 704 98 

Cast iron pipe and specials 3>577 9& 

Hydrants and gates and gate boxes 2,814 21 

Service pipe and boxes 2,506 26 

Meters 4, 1 69 42 

Machinery and tools 106 98 

Brass foundry 52 68 

Miscellaneous 3,428 57 

New office building 2,328 79 

$21,525 35 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 



17 



TABLE VI. 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT — LOWELL WATER WORKS, 

1904. 

Detail of "Principle and Interest" from Table II. 








Amount of 

Debt Jan. 1, 

1904. 


4 


Interest 
Paid 
1904. 


Paid on 

Notes 
1904. 


Amount of 

Debt Jan. 1, 

1905. 


Water loan bonds 


$1,000,000 OO 






$1,000,000 OO 


57 Coupons, No. 26... 
994 Coupons, No. 27 
874 Coupons, No. 28 
High Service bonds... 
15 Coupons, No. 45... 
13 Coupons, No. 46... 
Notes. 


$ 1,140 OO 
19,880 OO 
17,480 OO 






















75,000 OO 


4 




75,000 OO 


1,500 OO 
1,300 OO 
175 OO 
656 OO 
1,400 OO 
2,100 OO 












5,000 OO 
16,400 OO 
35,000 OO 
52,500 OO 


y/2 
4 
4 
4 


5,000 OO 
4,100 OO 
5,000 OO 

7,500 OO 






12,300 OO 
30,000 OO 
45,000 OO 




$1,183,900 OO 


$45,631 OO 


$21,600 OO 


$1,162,300 00 



1 8 REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 

TABLE VII. 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT— LOWELL WATER WORKS, 

1904. 

Maintenance and Construction Account. 



MAINTENANCE. 
Paid for labor: 

Salary of Superintendent $ 1,800 00 

Salary of Water Board 1 , 600 00 

Office and Inspectors 9. 1 29 91 

Pumping stations : 7> 211 4 2 

Meter Work 3, 252 62 

Engineering I ,346 69 

General maintenance 29, 173 96 

Paid for material: 

Output as per stock book !5 93° 1 5 

General expense 2,411 57 

Stable 1,810 85 

Pumping station supplies 2 >54Q 46 

Fuel 16,150 06 

Interest 45^631 00 

$I33>988 69 

CONSTRUCTION. 

Paid for labor " $ 7,277 10 

Land 92 46 

New office building 2,328 79 

Output as per stock book 6,465 70 

Payment on loans 21,600 00 

$37,764 05 



o 

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a 
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M 




Superintendent's Report 



Lowell, Mass., January 2, 1905. 

7!? the Lowell Water Board: 

Gentlemen : In accordance with the provisions of 
the City Ordinances, I have the honor of rendering to 
you the Annual Report of the Superintendent of Water 
Works for the year ending December 31, 1904. 

In the report of 1903 mention was made of the fa- 
vorable showing in the daily consumption of water for 
that year, it being the lowest of any year since 1889. 
This year I take pleasure in calling attention to the fact 
that the total expenditures for 1904 were less than in 
any year since 1887, with the single exception of the year 
1 89 1, when it was $180,250.56, against $181,298.94 the 
past year. In 1891, however, the city water was pumped 
directly from the Merrimack River into the reservoir, 
while now it is first pumped from the wells, then re- 
pumped into the reservoir, thereby doubling the pump- 
ing expenses. This shrinkage in the annual expenditures 
indicates, among other things, that the department is 
recovering from the burden of indebtedness consequent 
upon the construction of the driven well system. Re- 



22 REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 

ferring to 1891 recalls an impressive and significant fact; 
that is, about that time, 1890-91, Lowell's typhoid fever 
death rate was exceeded by only two or three cities in 
the world, and its mortality record was 24.95. During 
the last year the city's typhoid fever death rate is one of 
the lowest in the world, while the rate of mortality from 
all causes for 1904 is only 16.62, the lowest since 1850. 
That this great improvement in the health of the people 
of Lowell is due to a considerable extent to the city's 
magnificent water supply, goes without question. More- 
over, since 1891, the water works under the control of 
your honorable board, has grown and prospered so that 
it is now a more valuable asset than the rest of the city's 
property combined. 

During the past year an improvement has been 
made in the property of the department by the erection 
of a new office building, thus making available for shop 
purposes a much needed space in the machine shop oc- 
cupied by the old office. As authorized by your honor- 
able body, this building is of brick one story high, with 
granite coping and trimmings. It is especially designed 
for office work. The inside walls are finished in quar- 
tered oak, part panelled with panelled metallic ceiling. 
The office proper has a floor space of 15'x 20', and is 
connected by an iron stairway with a basement which is 
intended to be used for storing books, records, etc. It 
is situated on the northwest corner of the machine shop, 
commanding a good view of the shop, yard, stable and 
storehouse. By means of push buttons and electric 
bells those employed in the engine room, blacksmith 
shop, carpenter shop, machine shop, stable and paint 
shop, can be called to the office when needed. 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 23 



PLANT FOR TESTING LARGE METERS. 

For the purpose of testing large meters, such as 4", 
6", etc., or other devices for measuring water, a testing 
plant has been set up in the engine room of the Central- 
ville pumping station. This plant consists of an 8" pipe 
laid in the basement of the pumping station, from the 
high service main to the engine room floor, where it is 
reduced 6" pipe and extended along on wooden horses 
to a point where the water after passing through the 
meters can be discharged into the pump well. The 6" 
pipe line in the engine room where the meters are set 
for testing, is equipped with pizometer rings connected 
to a U gauge and mercury column, with Freeman nozzles 
attached for measuring the discharge. This plant was 
set up in March, since which time 7-6", 1-10", 1-12" meters 
and three devices were tested. All meters to be used 
for fire service can be tested at this plant, both for reg- 
istration and for loss of head. The testing has been 
conducted by W. F. Sullivan, of the city engineer's 
force, in a most thorough and comprehensive manner. 
Many of the tests made are new, and considerable data 
as to the practical working of these large meters has 
been obtained that was heretofore unknown. Cards and 
diagrams have been made by engineer Sullivan, showing 
the operation of every meter and device tested, with va- 
rying volumes of discharge, loss of head and percentage 
of registration. 



MAIN PIPES, EXTENSIONS, ETC. 

There is now a total of 133.68 miles of cast iron 
main pipe in use, a gain of 5706 feet during the year- 
Besides the extension of mains, change in street lines 



24 REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 

and grades made it necessary to lower 430 feet of 6" 
pipe on By street, 350 feet of 6" pipe on Fruit street, and 
225 feet of 8 r/ pipe had to be re-located on Riverside 
street, on account of sewer work. In connection with 
the extensions of main pipe laid, 1 5 stop gates were set, 
and for the better control of the mains already in use, 
19 additional gates were inserted in the mains. For this 
purpose seven of the 12" and two of the 6" valves taken 
out of the discontinued connections between the Locks 
and Canals Corporation System and the city pipes were 
used, 105 gates were repaired, and twenty-five gate boxes 
were renewed. 

PUBLIC FIRE SERVICE HYDRANTS. 

Of the thirteen four-way hydrants which the Board 
voted to set adjacent to the large corporations, two were 
set in 1903 and the remaining eleven early in the past 
year. Three other ordinary hydrants were also added, 
making a total of 11 38 public fire hydrants now in ser- 
vice. Eight flush hydrants were replaced by ^post 
hydrants, and five post hydrants broken or damaged 
beyond repair were replaced by new post hydrants; also 
288 hydrants were cleaned and repaired. The four-way 
hydrants set near the corporation were connected to 
large mains (laid especially for fire service) which had to 
be tapped and a gate used for every hydrant; that fact, 
together with the increased cost of the hydrants, accounts 
for an excess of over a thousand dollars for hydrants the 
past year compared with the previous year. 

As you may notice, the number of hydrants re- 
quired is large, almost one-third of the whole number; 
that fact is due principally to their unwarranted use for 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 25 

various purposes. This should not be; it is a bad prac- 
tice and may some day be the cause of serious results. 
The City Ordinances distinctly forbid the opening of hy- 
drants, 'excepting for fire, without permission of the 
Water Board. Sometimes hydrants are found in a to- 
tally disabled condition after being used by some unau- 
thorized person; just such a circumstance might be the 
means, of allowing a fire to gain great headway and 
ultimately develop into a conflagration. Following the 
lessons taught by the disastrous experiences of Balti- 
more, Patterson, Lynn, and other places, every care 
should be exercised in maintaining the fire hydrants and 
fire service of the city to the highest possible point of 
efficiency. 



26 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 



HYDRANTS, JANUARY 1st, 1905 



Kind 




2 
Noz. 


3 
Noz. 


4 
Noz. 


Total 


Boston Machine 




/ 


170 




170 


Chapman . 










3 


104 


50 


157 


Coffin 












1 




1 


Corey 












- 7 




7 


Eddy 












32 


1 


33 


Flush 








426 








426 


Glanmorgan 












1 




1 


Holyoke 














1 


1 


Kennedy . 












2 




2 


Ludlow 










3 


264 


14 


281 


Michigan 












43 




43 


O'Brien 












1 




1 


Perkins 














1 


1 


Walker 












3 




3 


Lowrey 








11 








11 


Totals 








437 


6 


628, 


67 


11.38 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 27 



PRIVATE FIRE SERVICE AND HYDRANTS. 

Two fire services were laid during the year, as fol- 
lows : 4" pipe for the Young Women's Christian Asso- 
ciation, John street and John avenue; U. S. Spool and 
Bobbin Co., 4" on Perry street. Fifteen 12" and two 8" 
connections with the Locks and Canals System for cor- 
poration fire service were cut off and gates removed. 
There are now in all 124 private fire services supplying 
74 private fire hydrants besides sprinklers and stand 
pipes, all of which were sealed during the year by In- 
spector Gardner, who was especially detailed for the 
inspection of fire services. His duties also include the 
reading of meters on premises provided with this extra 
protection, and to observe and report any failure to com- 
ply with the rules of the department governing private 
fire services. So far, his work has amply justified his 
appointment. 



28 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 



PRIVATE HYDRANTS JANUARY 1st, 1905. 



Kind. 


i 
Noz. 


2 

Noz. 


3 
Noz. 


4 
Noz. 


Total 


Boston Machine . 






i 


8 




9 


Chapman . 




i 


4 


1 


5 


1 1 


Coffin 








1 




1 


Flush 


• 3 










3 


Kenney 


• 




i 






1 


Ludlow 


. 




18 


14 


*o 


42 


Michigan . 








3 




3 


Perkins 


• 




3 


1 




4 


Totals 


■ 3 


i 


27 


28 


15 


74 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 29 



SERVICES. 

The number of house services or house connections 
have increased one hundred and seventy-eight (178) 
during the year, against one hundred and fifty five (155) 
the previous year and forty-three old services of various 
kinds of pipe were replaced with new pipe, principally 
Tin Lined Iron. Only thirty-five services were changed 
the previous year. An unusual number of services were 
also repaired owing to the severe cold spell last January 
when several were frozen and burst. Regrading of 
streets have made necessary the lowering of many 
services. Owing to the extra work as above, the 
expenses for service pipe for the year were $2,725.37 
an increase over the year previous of $ 1,468.61. In the 
line of service maintenance 367 curb boxes were set 
and 10 leaks on service pipes repaired. 



30 REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 



NEW SERVICES— 1904. 

160 y iron tin lined pipe 

7 1" iron tin lined pipe 

2 1 1/2 " iron tin lined pipe 

2 2" iron pipe 

3 4" iron pipe ' 

3 s/ 8 " lead pipe 

1 y lead pipe 



6. 


,142 

116 

70 


feet 

< i 

< i 




88 


a 




112 


< 1 




79 


i < 




3i 


<< 



178 6,638 " 

Amount previously laid 43^,973 feet 

Total now laid 445, 6 11 u 

Total services laid 1 2,058 

Total cut off at main 832 

Total reconnected 61 

Total now in ust .' 11,287 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 



31 



SERVICES CHANGED — 1904.. 





Kind. 


Changed to 


No. 


Tin 
Lined 

Ya 


Tin 

Lined 

1" 


Tin 

Lined 


Iron 

Ya 


Iron 
1" 


Iron 


Total 
Feet 


23 


y iron . 


5 11 












5ii 


3 


y iron . 




63 










63 


1 


yj' iron . 






, x 4 








14 


1 


yj' iron . 


' 






6 






6 


3 


1" iron 


64 












64 


1 


1" iron . 




21 










21 


1 


1" iron 






23 








23 


1 


1^2" iron 




95 










95 


1 


iy 2 " iron 












7 


7 


1 


2<"T. L. iron . 






18 








'18 


1 


1" L. L. iron . 










5 




5 


2 


S/ 8 " lead . 


4i 












4i 


1 


5/ 8 " lead . 




49 










49 


2 


34" lead . 




48 










48 


1 


34" lead . 






67 








67 


43 


Totals 


616 


276 


122 


6 


5 


7 


1032 



32 . REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 

The total number of meters in use at the close of 
the year was 7513, representing 66% of the total 
number of services in use. During the last four years 
there has been a net gain of 1927 meters in use in the 
department. One of the results of this rapid increase 
in meters has been a slight reduction in the total 
receipts, but to offset that there has been also a material 
decrease in the daily consumption of water, which in 
turn has made possible the reduction in the total 
expenses. 

The large number of meters frozen and burst 
during the winter of 1903 and 1904 (particularly last 
January) not only in Lowell, but in many other cities in 
the country, has had the effect of bringing to the atten- 
tion of Water Departments the advantages of setting 
meters in boxes located in the sidewalk. Their liability 
to freeze when set in the ground with an air tight box is 
reduced to a minimum, while their accessibility to the 
Inspector for reading makes it possible to read them 
faster than the present method of going into cellars for 
that purpose with all that entails, such as calling and 
finding the family away and the house and cellar locked, 
or possibly a pile of wood or coal placed over the meter, 
making a second call necessary. Another advantage of 
out side meters is that leaks in the service pipe beyond 
the sidewalk are all registered. During the year 
several meters were set in the ground as above described. 



REPORT OF .THE AVATER BOARD. 



33 



PRIVATE METERS RUNNING JANUARY 1, 1905 



Sizes 




3/8" 


H" 


Ya" 


1" 


i#" 


2" 


Total 


Columbia 






9 










9 


Crown . 






I 


29 


23 


2 


1 




56 


Desper . 










3 


1 






4 


Duplex . 








i 










1 


Empire . 








6 










6 


Frost 








2 


1 








3 


Hersey . 








16 


1 








17 


King 








i 










1 


Lambert 








12 










12 


Nash 








14 


2 






1 


17 


Thomson 










1 








1 


Trident . 










6 








6 


Worthington 












1 




3 


4 


Total 






I 


90 


37 


4 


1 


4 


137 



34 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 



METERS RUNNING JANUARY 1st, 1905. 



Size. 


H" 


%/tt 

7\ 


1" 


1%" 


2" 


3" 


4" 


6" 


Total 


Columbia . 


1 08 


4 














112 


Crown 


2760 


1582 


302 


19 


20 


5 


5 


2 


4695 


Desper 


19 


6 


5 












30 


Duplex 


1 


1 


4 












6 


Empire 


231 


40 


4 












275 


Frost 




1 














1 


Gem . 










7 




4 


2 


13 


Hersey 


485 


102 


8 


5 






1 




6^01 


King . 


6 
















6 


Lambert 


538 


72 














610 


Metropolitan 




1 














1 


Nash . 


149 


73 


45 




1 








268 


Niagara 


1 


1 














2 


Thomson . 


5 


19 


2 












26 


Trident 


503 


30 


1 












534 


Union 


28 


7 




1 










36 


Worthington 


112 


23 


52 


66 


35 


.6 


3 




297 


Total . 


4946 


1962 


423 


9i 


63 


1 1 


13 


4 


7513 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. . 35 



New meters set 277 

Meters out of repairs 900 

Meters repaired in cellars 215 

Meters reset : 795 

Meters condemned 27 

Meters condemned replaced with new 28 

Meters frozen and burst 367 

Meters discontinued 39 

Private meters set 16 



36 REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 



PUMPING STATIONS AND PUMPING. 

Taking the work of all the Pumping Stations 
together, there was a gross pumpage for the year of 
4,108,816,873 gallons, Deducting the quantity pumped 
at Boulevard Lower Pumping Station, 1,158,489,736 
gallons and the Boulevard Upper Station, 874,664,382 
gallons which had to be re-pumped, and after allowing a 
certain amount for condensation at Centralville Pumping 
Station, the net pumpage or the total quantity of water 
pumped for distribution was 2,007,487,767 gallons^ of 
which 63,947,712 gallons was pumped at the No. 2 or 
Cook Wells Pumping Station from the Cook and 
Washington Wells. This Station was started and ran 
five days not because it became necessary, but more 
for the purpose of trying it out and making sure that 
everything was all right in case of an emergency, and 
although the boilers and pipes were empty and some 
of the pipes disconnected, yet within six hours after 
receiving notice the Engineer had the Station in 
successful operation. Part of the main steam line at 
this Station which when first put up in 1893 was only 
second hand C. I. pipe, leaked so badly that it was 
thought best to replace it with new W. I. 6" pipe. As 
no steam is kept in the boilers when not running, care 
must be used in draining boilers, pipes, etc. to prevent 
freezing. For this reason, also, the feed water heater 
was changed from a horizontal to vertical position so 
that it could be more perfectly drained. Should occasion 
arise, this Station could be started in a few hours. 



> 

> 

Pi 
> 



O 
» 

H 

w 

H 

3 
p 

> 

fa 



M 

M 

M 

o 

w 




REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 39 



THE BOULEVARD PUMPING STATIONS. 

The Boulevard Upper Pumping Station was run 
considerable the past year because it required about 
3,000 lbs. less coal to pump 5,000,000 gallons than did 
the Lower Pumping Station ; no repairs of any account 
were made at the Upper Station, but while it was 
running the pumps and boilers at the Lower Station 
were overhauled and put in order. 



CENTRALVILLE PUMPING STATION. 

Most of the pumping at this Station was done by 
the Morris Engine. It ran very smoothly and proved 
comparatively economical in the use of fuel, for which 
reason it would have been run more, but it has a 
peculiar way of breaking down in some vital part which 
requires several days or weeks to repair ; for instance, 
it was out of commission until February 27th, awaiting a 
new filling-in piece belonging between the high-pressure 
steam cylinder and the condenser, which was broken 
the year before. Later in the year the crank pin was 
noticed working loose and examination showed it to be 
an imperfect fit and a new one had to be forged and 
forced in. Since then the Engine has run very well and 
with only slight repairs. 

The High Duty Worthington Pump which has been 
the main reliance of this Pumping Station for the last 



40 REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 

ten years required considerable attention during the 
year. It showed signs of weakening the year before 
and called for extensive repairs but the past year after 
fitting it with a new foot valve, supposing that would 
prove all that was necessary to make it run all right 
again, serious trouble was encountered which, upon 
investigation, proved to be due to a crack in Low 
Pressure Steam Cylinder about seven inches long and 
extending through the jacket. White metal was melted 
down and run into the crack from the inside of the 
cylinder and for the purpose of stopping leakage 
through it; but the live steam pressure in the jackets 
loosened the metal patch so that the jacket pressure had 
cut out altogether; of course that reduced the efficiency 
of the engine materially. However, the Superheater 
contracted for by Your Honorable Board may prove 
an offset to the loss of the jacket steam and enable the 
engine to do as well as ever or better, as the Con- 
tractors furnishing the Superheater guarantee. 

Occasionally during the year necessity compelled 
the running of the Low Duty Worthington Pump. It 
takes, however, so much coal to pump the daily supply 
of water with it that it is like wasting money to have to 
do so. For illustration, the Morris Engine pumping 
5^ million gallons consumes 13,000 lbs. while 17,000 
lbs. is burned when the Low Duty Worthington is 
running, doing the same work. 

Taking it as a whole, the Department is in good 
condition and it stands first class, particularly as to the 
quality and quantity of its supply. It must be admitted, 
however, that its pumping outfit is lamentably weak and 
inefficient and though the financial showing for the 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 41 

Department the past year is as good as far as the 
expenditures are concerned, a still further saving could 
be effected if the pumping equipment of the Department 
was brought up-to-date. A new ,pump to take the place 
of the Low Duty Worthington ought to be considered 
as soon as possible. 



RESERVOIRS. 

As customary, every summer since the introduction 
of Driven Well water, in order to avoid trouble from 
Algae, the High Service Reservoir was shut off and the 
water for that system pumped directly into the mains. 
No such measures have been found necessary for the 
last three summers regarding the Low Service Reservoir, 
although during the past summer a large abundance of 
green growth, presumably Algae, was plainly observable 
on the walls of the reservoir, much of which was 
removed by hand ; yet it had no apparant effect on the 
odor or taste of the water drawn from the reservoir. 

The only outlay on acQOunt of the reservoir was 
the rebuilding of a part of the fence on Christian Street. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



Two new drinking fountains for people were set 
during the year; one at Hosford Square and one in 
Pawtucketville on Mammoth Road near the corner of 



42 REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 

Riverside Street. A combination drinking fountain 
made of 30" cast iron pipe was set on Broadway 
opposite the Mann School. All the fountains were 
cleaned twenty times, and 151 complaints regarding 
fountains were attended to. The streets mains were 
blown off as usual during the year. 

At the parks along the Conduit in Pawtucketville 
and at the Pumping Station and Reservoir grounds 
flowers were set out, making them look more beautiful 
than ever before. 

On January 1st of the past year a break occurred 
in the 30" force main on Sixth Street near the corner of 
Read Street. Outside the injury done to the surface of 
the street by the escaping water, no other damage was 
done. In order to repair it, 7 feet of new 30" pipe had 
to be used. 

An examination of the Conduit revealed a bad spot 
in the brick work under Third Avenue. This was 
repaired and the Conduit, Tunnel and Filter Gallery 
thoroughly cleaned. The tunnel was flushed with hose 
connected to near-by hydrants. 

Hay of good quality to the extent of about 40 tons 
was cut oft the lands of the Department at the Reservoir 
and on the Boulevard. A considerable quantity of the 
previous year's crop being left, over twelve tons of it 
was sold, realizing a sum of money sufficient to meet the 
expense incurred in cutting and saving the whole crop. 

Two new horses were purchased during the year 
and two old ones sold. Tweny-four sewers were 
flushed during the year, and seven flush hydrant boxes 
were renewed. 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 43 

CONCLUSION. 

It affords me satisfaction to be able to acknowledge 
my sincere thanks to President Crowley and the 
members of the Board for their kind and considerate 
treatment during the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ROBERT J. THOMAS, 

Superintendents 



44 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 



LOW SERVICE — WATER PIPES LAID IN 1904. 



Streets. 



Aiken 

Beaulieu 

Cashin 

City Ave 

City Stables . . . 

Corey 

Dana 

Dartmouth Ave 

Eaton 

Grace 

Inland 

John Ave 

John Ave. . . . 

Lipton 

Middlesex 

Moody 

Olney 

Orchard 

Perry 

Plymouth 

Porter 

Third Ave. . . . 

West 

West Sixth 

West Sixth ... 



Between What Streets. 



Ford and Cheever 

Northerly trom West Sixth 
Southerly from Princeton... 
Easterly from City Hall Ave. 

Cart sprinkler standpipe 

Southerly from Princeton... 

Northerly from Ludlam 

Westerly to Hildreth 

Extended southwesterly. . . 

Northerly to Liberty 

Easterly from Blodgett 

Westerly from John 



Fire Service to Y. W. C. A, 
building 



Southerly to Forest 

On street car sprinkler stand- 
pipe west of Baldwin .... 



Extended northerly 

Westerly from Gorham 
Extended northerly 



Fire service to U. S. Spool 
and Bobbin Co 



Extended southerly . . 

Extended easterly 

Westerly from Crawford. 
Northerly from Blossom 

Westerly to Beaulieu 

Southerly towards Ennell 
Hydrants 



Laid in 1903 



77 
36 



46 
10 



11 



79 



259 



Length in Feet. 



201 
393 
505 



144 

319 

1080 

72 

273 

146 



200 



99 

84 



130 
48 

144 
72 

154 
48 

205 

4317 



639 



639 



454 



454 



Total. 



201.0 
393.0 
505.0 

77.0 

36.0 

144.0 

319.0 

1080.0 

720 
273.0 
146.0 

46.0 

10.0 

200.0 

11.0 

1093.0 

99.0 

84.0 

79.0 

130.0 
48.0 

144.0 
720 

154.0 
48.0 

205.0 

5669.0 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 



45 



HIGH SERVICE — WATER PIPES LAID IN 1904. 





Between what Streets 


Length in Feet 




Streets 


.E 


a 


c 

CO 


a 

6 


a 


Total 








37.5 








37.5 








37.5 








37.5 




High Service laid previous 




37884 5 


















Total High Service to 












37922.0 


. 

















46 REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 



Brought forward 5,669.0 feet 

Low Service laid previous to 1904 662,228.0 feet 

Total Low Service to January 1, 1905 667,897.0 feet 

Total High Service to January 1, 1905 37,922.0 feet 



Total High and Low Service to January 1, 1905. . 705,819.0 feet 
Total in miles, 133.68 

Changes 

By street, 430 ft. 6 in. pipe relocated. 
Fruit street, 350 ft. 6 in. pipe relocated. 
Riverside street, 225 ft. 8 in. pipe relocated. 

Corporation fire service connections and gates taken out 
during 1904. 

12 in. connection to Appleton Co., Jackson street. 
12 in. connection to Bigelow Carpet Co., Market street. , 
12 in. connection to Boott Cotton Mills, Amory street. 
12 in. connection to Hamilton Mfg. Co., Jackson street. 
12 in. connection to Lawrence Mfg. Co., Hall street. 
12 in. connection to Lowell Machine Shop, Dutton street. 
12 in. connection to Lowell Machine Shop, Jackson street. 
12 in. connection to Mass. Cotton Mills, Canal street. 
12 in. connection to Merrimack Mfg. Co., foot of Dutton street. 
12 in. connection to Merrimack Mfg. Co., foot of Dutton street. 

8 in. connection to Middlesex Co., Warren street. 

8 in. connection to Middlesex Co., Warren street. 
12 in. connection to Prescott Mills, Merrimack square. 
12 in. connection to Tremont and Suffolk Mills, Tremont street. 
12 in. connection to Tremont and Suffolk Mills, Tremont and Hall. 
12 in. connection to Tremont and Suffolk Mills, Hall and Suffolk. 
12 in. connection to Tremont and Suffolk Mills, Cabot street. 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 



47 



LOW SERVICE- LIST OF STOP GATES SET DURING 

THE YEAR 1904. 



STREETS 



Aiken 

Aiken 

Amory. . . . 
Amory. 

Amory. 

Beaulieu. . 
*By 



Canal 

*Chelmsford 

City Stables 
Dana 



Dartmouth Ave 

Dutton 

Dutton 

Fort Hill Park 



French 
Gates . . 



Grace. . . 
Grand . . 
Grand . . 
Howard. 



LOCATION 



19.2 ft. west of east line Ford street, 5.3 ft. north of south 
line Aiken street 



51.4 ft. east of west line Aiken street canal bridge, 4.7 ft. 
north of south line canal bridge 

On hydrant connection near entrance to Mass. Cotton 
Mills 



On hydrant connection 18.2 ft. north of south line Amory 
street, 9 ft. east of east line John street 



On hydrant connection iS ft. north of south line Amory 
street 7^ ft. west of west line John street 



12 ft. east of west line Beaulieu on north line West Sixth 
street 



Relocation 11% ft. south of north line By street, on east 
line Hildreth street 



On hydrant connection near entrance to Mass. Cotton Mills 

31.3 ft. east of west line Chelmsford street, on north line 
Daly street 



On supply to sprinkler cart standpipe. 



12 ft. east of west line Dana street, on north line Ludlam 
street 

12 ft. north of south line Hildreth street, 14.3 ft. west of 
east line Hildreth street 



On hydrant connection near entrance to Lowell Machine 
Shop 



41.4 ft. south of S.-E. Cor. House No. 675, on west line 
Wamesit court 



55J^ ft. south of north line Rogers street g]4. ft. west of 
stone fender 



On hydrant connection 8% ft. east of west line Kirk street 

14.2 ft. west of east line Gates street on north line West- 
ford street 



12 ft. east of west line Grace street on south line Liberty 
street 



15.4 ft. west of east line Grand street, on north line West" 
ford street 

16.5 ft. south of north line Grand street, 0.3 ft. east of west 
line Chelmsford street 



23.2 ft. north of south line Howard street, on west line 
Chelmsford street 



c c 



* 6 in. gate By street at Hildreth relocation. 12 in. gate Middlesex near Gorham 
relocation. 12 in. gate taken out Chelmsford street at Howard street. 



4 8 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 



LOW SERVICE— LIST OF STOP GATES SET DURING 
THE YEAR 1904 — Continued. 



STREETS 



Hurd 

Jackson 

John Ave 

Lawrence 

Lawrence 

Lipton 

London 

Market 

Merrimack 

Merrimack 
Merrimack Sq. 
Merrimack Sq . 

Middlesex 

*Middlesex . . . 

Middlesex 

Moody 

Olney 

Perry 

Riverside 

Warren 

West 

Worthen 



LOCATION 



On hydrant connection, southerly side, near George street 

On hydrant connection, west of entrance to Lowell 

Machine Shop 

6 ft. north of south line John avenue, 17.7 ft. east of west 

line John street 

25.7 ft. east of west line Lawrence street, on south line 

Ames street 

14 ft. west of east line Lawrence street, 41 8 ft. south of 

south line Shermam street 

12 ft. east of west line Lipton street, 11. 7 ft. south of north 

line Forrest street 

20.1 ft. south of north line London, on east line Main 

street 

21 ft. west of west line Palmer street, 18.S ft. south of 

north line Market street 

33 ft. south of north line Merrimack street, 13 ft. east of 

west line Hanover street 

29 7 ft. south of north line Merrimack street, 3 ft. east of 

east line Old City Hall 

On hydrant connection, northerly side, opp. Prescott Mills 

On hydrant connection, northerly side, in front Runels 

Building 

On street car sprinkler standpipe, 23.3 ft. north of south 

line Middlesex, 148 ft. west of west line Baldwin 

(Relocation) 17.7 ft. north of south line Middlesex, 334 

ft. west of west line Gorham street 

16.3 ft. south of north line Middlesex, 0.9 ft. west of west 

line School street 

13 ft. north of south line Moody street, on west line 

Seventh ave 

12 ft. south of north line Olney street, 15.7 ft. east of west 

line Gorham street 

On fire service to U. S- Spool and Bobbin Co., 10.9 ft. east 

of west line Perry St., 53 ft. north of north line building 
25.7 ft. south of north line Riverside street, 1.5 ft. east of 

east line White street 

On hydrant connection, southerly side, opp. Middlesex 

Co. 's office 

10 ft. west of east line West St., on north line Blossom st. 



On hydrant connection, easterly side opp. 
Print Works 



Merrimack 



* 6 in. gate By street at Hildreth relocation. 12 in. gate Middlesex near Gorham re- 
location. 12 in. gate taken out Chelmsford street at Howard street. 

HIGH SERVICE — LIST OF STOP GATES SET DURING 

THE YEAR 1904. 



STREETS 


LOCATION 


a 


c 

1 


c 
so 


a 
6 


c 


C 




13 ft. south of north line Whitman street, 


17.7 ft. east of 













REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 



49 



LOW SERVICE— LIST OF HYDRANTS SET DURING 

THE YEAR, 1904. 



STREETS 



Amory 

Amory 

Armory 

*Canal 

Dutton 

French 

Hurd 

Jackson 

Merrimack Sq 
Merrimack Sq 

Plymouth 

Warren 

Worthen 



LOCATION 



At entrance to Mass. Cotton Mills. 

Southerly side, east of John street. 

Southerly side, west of John street. 

At entrance to Mass. Cotton Mills. 

Easterly side, just north of entrance to Lowell Machine Shop. 

Opposite Kirk street near Merrimack Co.'s storehouse. 

Southerly side, near George street. 

Northerly side, west of entrance to Lowell Machine Shop. 

Northerly side, opp. Prescott Mills. 

Northerly side, in front Runels building. 

Easterly side, in front No. 25. 

Southerly side, opp. Middlesex Co.'s office. 

Easterly side, opp. Merrimack Print Works. 



* Old flush hydrant discontinued. 



5o 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 



CAST IRON PIPE AND SPECIALS IN STOCK DEC. 31. 

1904. 



Size in inches 


4" 


6" 


8" 


10" 


12" 


16" 


20" 


24" 

17 

5 
1 

4 


30" 


Lengths of pipe 
Sleeves 


2 
I 


244 

3 
4 

15 
i 

7 

2 
2 

4 


133 
4 

1 
8 

3 
12 
6 

8 
2 


1 

2 


121 

3 
2 

2 

6 

2 

5 


9 

7 
2 

2 

5 
8 

9 


11 
1 
1 
1 

6 
5 


2 
1 


Caps 




Plugs 


I 


4 
1 




% Bends 




)/ % Bends 


4 
4 
3 




T V Bends 




2 


1 D 

Offsets 


1 




Gates 


8 

























64 feet 4" pipe. 

38 feet 10" pipe. 

5 feet 30" pipe. 



CAST IRON PIPE IN PIECES 

pipe. 



47 feet 6' 
30 feet 12' 



pipe. 



50 feet 8" pipe. 
13 feet 16" pipe. 



HYDRANTS, COVERS, ETC. 

1 Lowrey hydrant, 3 Walker hydrants, 3 Corey hydrants, 
5 Flush hydrants, 1 frame and cover for Lowrey hydrant, 15 Flush 
hydrant frames, 6 Stone gate covers, 4 frames and covers for Meter 
boxes, 25 Iron gate boxes, 15 frames and covers for gate boxes, 
1 30" Manhole, 23 bottoms for gate boxes 4 feet long; 9 5 feet 
long; 6 6 feet long, 7 \ x / 2 " Sidewalk boxes, 26 \" Sidewalk boxes. 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 



51 



Smith 
Gates and Sleeves 


a. 
n 

n 
-1 


O 

H 

O 

'XL 

in 

n 

C/5 


W 

(0 

B 

O 

VI 


w 

5" 



V) 


1— 1 




On 


Co 


4X4 


t-H 


1 






6x2 


to 


vO 


vO 


"<» 


6x4 


h-( 




ON 


On 


6x6 


to 


4* 


ON 


Co 


8x4 


Co 


to 


ON 


to 


8x6 


to 




to 

O 




8x8 


►H 


Co 


Co 


ON 


10 x 4 


Cn 


to 


hH 


Co 


10 x 6 


to 


4* 


00 


On 


10 x 8 






1—1 




vO 


10 x 10 


1— 1 


00 


to 


»— 1 


12 x 4 


to 


4* 


00 


to 


12 x 6 




Co 


1— 1 




h-l 
1— 1 


12 x 8 




Co 


v£> 


vO 


12 x 10 






00 


to 


12 x 12 
16 x 4 






v£> 


Cn 


16 x 6 




►H 


On 


4* 


16 x 8 




CO 


to 


CO 


16 x 10 




4* 


^J 


4* 


16 x 12 


• 




^1 


Cn 

1— 1 

to 


16 x 16 
20 x 6 
20 x 8 
20 x 10 
20 x 12 




1— 1 






24 x 20 



Report of the City Engineer 



Office of City Engineer. 

Lowell, Mass., January i, 1905. 

To the Lowell Water Board: 

Gentlemen : — I have the honor to submit the 
Thirty-second Annual Report, for the year ending 
December 31, 1904. 

PUMPAGE. 

Total net pumpage for 1904 2,007,487,767 Gallons. 

Total net pumpage for 1903 1,923,370,860 Gallons. 

An increase in 1904 of 84,116,907 Gallons. 

CONSUMPTION. 

Consumption for 1904 2,007,628,297 Gallons. 

Consumption for 1903 1,922,390,231 Gallons. 

An increase in 1904 of 85,238,048 Gallons. 

The maximum pumpage for any one day was on Wednesday, 
February 17, viz: — 

At West Sixth Street station 6,573,750 Gallons. 

At Cook Wells station 2,971,904 Gallons. 

Total 9)545,654 Gallons. 



54 REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 

The maximum pumpage for any one week was on the week 
of February 16 — 22, viz : — 

At West Sixth Street station 38,407,670 Gallons. 

At Cook Wells station 20,579,424 Gallons. 

Total 58,987,094 Gallons. 

The pumpage for High Service was 68,174,988 gallons, which 
is 15,301,230 gallons more than last year. 

The cost of Low Service pumpage is nineteen dollars and 
sixty-nine cents ($19.69) per million gallons, a decrease of four 
dollars and thirty-four cents ($4.34) per million gallons from that 
of last year. 

The cost of High Service pumpage is eleven dollars and fifty- 
two cents ($11.52) per million gallons, which added to the cost of 
Low Service pumpage ($19.69), makes the total cost of pumpage 
into the High Service system, thirty-one dollars and twenty-one 
cents ($31.21) per million gallons a decrease of nine dollars and 
ten cents ($9.10) per million gallons from that of last year. 



o 

en 

M 

o 
w 

?C 

w 

M 
O 

M 



r 

o 
o 

T, 
i— i 

o 

en 
o 

H 
35 




co 
O 

t— H 

< 
H 
co 

< 

> 

co 

W 
K 
H 

H 

< 

E- 

O 





o 


qo 


tT 


o 


o 


O 


o 


in 


m 


o 


o 


IQ 


!>• 




o 


a 


o 


CN 




m 


CO 


i^ 


CO 


■>* 


■>3< 


oc 


CO 




o 


lO 


cm 


X 


CN 


T* 


l-H 


CO 


o 


TI< 


Tfl 


OO 


t- 
































in 


OO 




OS 


r^ 


o 




CO 


■>»< 


CO 


1-1 


Tjl 


t^ 




a 


00 


CO 


00 


t- 


Ci 


o 


o> 


t- 


m 


y3 


CN 


00 


fcS 


i« 




CO 


rH 


.n 


m 


co 


C3 


f-H 


CN 


CO 


•^» 


re 




























CO 


CO 


co 


CO 


© 


co 


CO 


co 


Tf 


in 


CO 


CM 


c- 


n 


o 

CN 


o 
cn 


i^ 


TT 


CD 


«— > 


L- 


in 


to 


m 


co 


so 


o 
© 
cn' 



5 « 



O 

OS 









< 






Q O 

^ 2 
;> 

H 
H 

a 

o 

I-H, 

o 

E 

co 

W 

< 





— i 

H 
< 
H 
fi 





co cp co 



cm co m oo 



co co co co co co 






OC/3 

o 



c 
2* 

cjoju 
lea 






4>« 



£ > 

h! o 



o— i 

O «J 



f 00 


00 


■* 


o 


Tj< 


o 


o 


o 


o 


— 


to 


CO 


3 CN 


o 


<M 


00 




o 


CO 


CO 


o 


CO 


m 


00 


5 l~- 


OS 


CO 


l~ 


lH 


uu 


CO 


TJ< 


CO 




•«< 


OJ 


























oo 


CN 


OS 


CO 


CN 


CO 


m 


I-- 


t^ 


•<*! 


TT 


•* 


■5 00 


tT 


o 


co 


i— ( 


o 


cc 


T*l 


co 


CO 


•<r 


l- 


H CO 


t^ 


I-H 


CO 


o 


co 


"d< 


00 


TT 


00 


l-H 


i— 1 


»< CO 


<N 


co 


co 


co 


CM 


CO 

lH 


2 


Tf< 


CN 


CO 


oo 

cc 



m Ci cn h 
o o m m 
co oo m . o 



CM tH rl 



»H l-H CO i-l 



O r- l-l 



CO 00 i-H 



*& l-H i-H 



o i-< m ih 



CN i-l l-H 



00 OJ CO CN 



fc 



a cj c 



^ ^ a. *: 



^ Q 



o 



H 
O ^ 

tH 

I * 

w w 

H 



o 

I— I 



D 

Ph 



H 

t-H 

H 

< en 

O? O 

H 
< 
H 

CO 



Pk 

Ph 

co 



-1 

p* 



co 

O 



< 

i— i 

Ph 



O 

E 

co ? 

Ph 
W 

PQ 
< 



c 


1 


| 


| 


1 


| 


1 




| I 


1 


.2 w 


CN 


IM 


o» 


o 


© 


T-I 




CO <T. 


tH 


~ c 


•* 


iC 


co 


°J 


© 


co 




© CO 


CN 


•» « o 


o> 


i— i 


© 


tH 


CO 


©" 




o c- 


rH 


S=3 




»H 


CN 


t-I 




m 




CN r- 


eo 


^ 














«? <*? 


SO 




















Oh 






















—H 


O 


O 


CM 


co 


© 




© 






00 


i-( 


o 


t- 


CN 


CO 




oq_ 




to 


r-4 


id 


a 


eo 


cn 


vi '. 




>a" 






© 


CO 


CO 


rH 


© 




o 




CS 


CO 


t- 


CO 


tr- 


rH 


eo 




CO 
























O 


oo 




rH 


ee 


CO 


o~ ; 




© 




H 


tH 






tH 




•^ 




rr 




0» 










«* : 




6© 






in 


00 


CN 


CO 


CM 


co 


CO t- 






Id 


CO 


i— 1 


CO 


CO 


d- 


O CO 




mr/ OT 


O 


OJ_ 


t~ 


t- 


co 


00 


TH 




WW c 




















O 


1*" 


!>• 


© 


Tj? 


«o ; 


© 




rt • O 


"tfi 


t- 


T* 


cc 


CO 




CN CO 




o£> = 


IO 


rH 


C\ 


■<»< 


co_ 


oo_ ; 


CO "#_ 




Kso 


eo" 


CO" 


co" 


CO~ 


hT 


oo" 


rH t-" 




^ 


co 


co 


m 


t- 


o 


o o 




Oi 






tH 


00 


tH 


TH 


























iH 






rH 




Tf 


CN CN 





w 
H 
-< 
IS 

w 
I 

On 

Oh 

D 

C/3 

h 

o 

w 

o 

& 

co 



bo I 5 
,„ j » 

.o o 
'£ co « 

55 S 



u ^1 
« S © 

.5 c W « 
Q » ° ^ 

O w <UTJ 



>rH 3 

t*! o 
£ S 





oo 

00 
tH_ 

oo" ' 

CO 












• CO 

• 00 
. OS 
! -rjT 

. r> 
'"1. 

• oo" 
'. & 









s 





* * 

CO CN 

CO CO 
t-_CO_ 

cc co 

Tj<_CO_ 

oo V 

IC t- 

tH CO 




- 







-c-p 



-l-> .X 

in > 

u 

1) 






a. 



C03 



bC ^ 



be 



CO 

rC 

Cfl 



a, 

S 

3 
Oh 



3 

a, 

<u 

04 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 59 



The following tables, showing the performance of 
the engines, depth and quantity of water in the Beacon 
Street Reservoir, average temperature of the air and 
water at the Beacon Street Reservoir, and the average 
monthly and daily consumption of water, have been cal- 
culated and compiled from the records kept by the 
engineers and gate-keeper. 



c* 




o 




fe 




u 




£ 




1— 1 




o 




£ 




w 




> 




H 




P 




Q 




X 


Tfl 


O 

r-H 


O 
OS 


£ 


T— ( 




Pi! 


£ 


< 


O 


W 


H 


^ 


O 




£ 


w 


i— i 
H 


a: 


o 






£ 


ffi 


Q 


H 




i— i 




£ 






O 



o * 
o 






o 

HI 

CO 

W 

PQ 
< 



.„C u 
























y on 

coal 

med 

uctio 

hes o 

kers 


iO 


r^ 


CO 


05 


CO 


t- 


CM 


OJ 


00 


t» 


■* 


co 


o 


in 


CO 





CM 


CM 


CM 




as 


CO 


rH 

cd 




o" : 


o 


»o 


co_ 

00~ 


oi_ 




IC • 


t-" 





Dut 

total 
:onsu 
o ded 
or as! 
clin' 








CO 


CM 




t- 


CO 


co , ; 


■* 


IO 


TT_ 


o 


rt<_ : 


t- 


1-1 


t- 





o_ 


cv 


00 


t» 


TH 


o" 


I— 1 


00" 


co" 


CO 


0" 


cm" 


of 


0" 


00" 


00 


00 


co 


00 


00 


00 


CO 


CO 


10 ; 


CD 


l> 


G^ -1 
























Duty in lbs. 

i foot high 

with ioo lbs. 

coal used in 

pump'g only; 

no deduction 

for ashes or 

clinkers 


as 


-H 


CO 


o> 


f^ 





1-H 


^ 


CM 


l> 


CO 


co 


CO 


KS 


CO 


CM 


iO 


Ttl 


CI 


a> 


as 


as 


©^ 


Tf 


"*« 


C5_ 


CO 


t-_ 


CD^ 


co_ 


-<*i 




i-_ 


i>" 


cm" 


o" ; 


O" 


t^-" 


Oi" 


hT 


i^-~ 


00 ! 


r-" 


as" 


00 


co 




CO 







O 


00 


CO 


■^ri 






00 

of 


■* 


oo~ 


CD 


CM_ 

■*" 


CO 

t-" 


cm" 


00 

CO" 


00 
O" 


CM 

O" 


00 


00 


00 


00 


CO 


00 


CO 


CO 


50 • 


CD 


00 


in O 
























illon 

ater 

d hit 

voir 

lb. 

coal 

med 


to 


CO 


CO 


CO 


1^ 





Ov 


Tf 


CfJ 


Tf 


■<*< 


No. ga 
of w; 

pumpe 

reser 

per 

total 

consu 




CO 


OS 


"* 


CM 




CO 


IO 


CO 


■* 


1^ 


to. 


>o 


iO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


Tf 


TP 


«* 


Tfl 


iO 


bi).t! jj « ^ s 


IO 


CO 


CO 





O 


CD 


iO 


CM 


iO 


1> 


rH 


.o 


o 


CN 


10 


t- 


O 


CM 


Tfl 


l> 


00 


O0 


CO 


00 


eo_ 


CN 


»o 


»-H 


O 


CD 


°i 


CO 


C-_ 


h B e h- 


<# 


o" 


t-" 


co" 


rf 


1-t 


IO" 


cm" 


10" 


«df 


t-" 


CO 


l>- 


o> 


Ci 


1-H 


iO 


CO 


CM 





00 


O 


> i5 a <u _ rt 


CO 


t-_ 


co_ 


cO_ 


IO 


TJ1 


co_ 


CO 


■* 


n 


«* 


co 


io" 


ifl 


co" 


id 


IO 


cm" 


Tf 


1 ^*" 


7-t 


us 


^ •£ 


o 


o 


o 








O 


iO 


10 





iO 


IO 




o 


IO 


o 


m 


iO 


O 


fc- 


OJ 


IO 


t- 


i> 


CO 


i~ 


iO 


CM_ 


CM 


S 


00_ 


rH 


t-_ 


eo 


CO 


§ S £D = 


io" 


co 


cc* 


CO 


t> 


i^" 


CO~ 


CC 


cm" 


<?r 


06* 


OS 


i< 


co 


CM 


co 


1^ 


as 


as 


10 


CO 


CO 


iO 


°1 


1—1 


CO_ 


TT 


co_ 


o_ 








r» 






co" 


io~ 


Tl"" 


co" 


id 


»d 


t-" 


id 


tf 


cm" 


0" 


o 


IO 


o^ 




CD 


CM 




OJ 


"* 




co 


CM 


1-H 


1—1 




i-H 


T-l 










as 


v b£ „ 
























Averag 

head, 

includir 

friction 

in feet 


■* 


fc- 


o 


co 


uO 


IO 





CM 


CO 


CO 


T 


<* 

CO 


CO 


CO 


00 

CO 




CO 


rH 

CO 


a-. 
co 

CO 


CM 

>* 

CO 


CO 


IO 

3 


rH 


1— ' 




TH 


r-( 


1-H 


1-H 


r-i 


fi 


r-i 


rH 


OJ 
























qj -*-» 


























rf 


ao 


CO 


00 


CO 


O 


rH 


CM 


•& 


CM 


CM 


CO 


t 


co 


■«* 


CO 


O 


iO 


CM 


CO 


t-^ 


O 


Avei 

No. 

stro 

ma 

er m 


cm" 


tH 


o 


OS 


CO 


rH 





O 


© 


T^l 


rH 


rH 


1— I 


rl 




i-H 


1-1 


1-1 


r-t 




^ 


rH 


a 




















• 




JS 
























u-i co ti 


o 


00 


CO 





CC 


O 


IO 


ic 


fjl 


m 


as 


o u u £ 


CM 


lO 


CO 


t- 


CO 




CM 


as 


I> 


00 


CO 


OJ 


00 


eo 


«e 


i-H 


eo_ 


o\ 


lO 


*#, 


03 


CO 


£ >- G 


©~ 


id 


i-H* 


! o-T 


y-4 


tjT 


00" 


ed 


t-" 


t-" 


0" 


lO 




?9 






CO 


T-l 


iO 






00 


«5 tn h 


25 


Tf 


co 




TH 


CO 




CN 


rH 




cm" 


a 
























bo* 
■** o> C e 


o 


o 


o 





O 





O 





O 








No. c 

hour: 

pumpi 

permoi 


o 


CO 
CO 


o 

1 




1 


O 

1 

O 


CO 
CO 


O 

1 
O 


CO 

1 

CO 




co 
1 





1 


■w" 


o 


CO 


1-H 


•-H 


e 


CO 




00 


1-H 


10 


t- 


CO 


IO 




I> 


10 




tT 


rH 




co 


rage 

of 
ars 
ping 
day 


o 


1-1 


CO 


O 


O 


1-H 





00 


Tf 


lO 


Cs 


o 
1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


O 
1 



1 


•* 


CM 
1 


• T 


1 


<U O o G v< 


-* 


OJ 


co 


t~ 


co 


CM 





00 


00 


lO 


1-H 


>h;r y C OJ 


<M 


CM 


CM 




CM 


<M 


r-l 


rH 


1-H 




CM 


bG 
















































O wi .E 

. f»^a 


»H 


t- 


CO 


iH 


O 


CO 


co 


CM 





• CM 


<M 

1-1 


°r£ G 

£^3 


CO 


<N 


CM 




co 


CM 




CM 


rH 




a 
























03 






















!/> 


X 
















14 


>. 




TJ v 




>1 












CJ 


1 


3 « 


c bi) 


>-> 


5- 










^j 


ja 


U J- 


3 ii 


C< C4 


o 

3 


u 
cd 

3 
C 


CS 

3 
u 


cj T. 

« i 




c 


J5" 


to 

be 

3 


£ 

a 

CJ 

03 


£ ! 


J 4J 

: u 


CO J) 

« > 


cU 


b 


% < 


5 S 


3 
1 — 1 


3 


< 


5? 


5 Q 


H 



u 




< 




w 




& 




o 




Uh 




u 




:z; 




►— H 




o 




£ 




w 




X 




w 




J 




Oh 


"* 


u 


• — J 


Q 


C5 
1—1 


Z 


ti 


o 


< 


H 


W 


O 


> 


£ 




H 


w 

X 


O 






r— 1 


E 


ti 


H 


U 


M 


a 


£ 






X 


w 


H 


£ 


Z 


o 


o 


Q 


s 


W 




ri 




O 





•—I 

o 

E 

w 

PQ 

< 



^ 






















— < t-T c o 


C5 


i— ( 


© 


© 


© 


CM 


t- 


© 


© 




© 


t^ 


co 


CO 


© 


CM 


© 


© 


CO 


uty oi 
;al co 
isume 
educt 
ashes 
inker 




©_ 


eq 


co" 


CO. 


"^. 




© 
© 


I> 


co 




■<9< 


■** 


CO 


© 


r-l 


■^ 


X 


eo 


CO 




°l 


eo_ 


lO 


C3 


TH_ 


■•<_ 


CO_ 


Oft 


co 


*- u o c 




CO 


i-T 


of 


CN* 


t-»" 


TlT 


t-" 


©" 


«—t 




m ; 


lft 


TT 


lO 


'TJ' 


\a 


"* 


lft 


■o 


c^ 






















os 


rH 


© 


© 


© 


CM 




© 


© 




© 


1^ 


CO 


CO 


© 


CI 


id • 


© 


CM 


Duty in 1 

i foot hij 

with ioo 1 

coal used 

pumpi'go 

no deduct 

for ashes 

clinker 




o 


CO 


eo 


CO 


rH 


l> 


© 


I- 


Tjl^ 




© : 

**• 


-* 

•* 


00 

CO 


t-" 

to 


T-^ 




eo 
© 


© 
© 


©" 




°1 

'co 


r-~ 


lO 

©" 


©^ 


rH 


•* 


CO 
CO 


CM 


CM 

eo 




lft 


lO 


Tf> 


lO 


*& 


ift 


^ 


iC 


IQ 




















(/] o 




















No. gallon 
of water 

pumped int 
reservoir 

per lb. 
total coal 
consumed 




















00 


1^ 


t< 


© 


© 


CN 


© 


Q 


CM 




I> 


© 


CO 


lO 


© 


Tf 


t^ 


CO 


; « 


eo 


: co 


eo 


eo 


■* 


co ; 


eo 


CO 




o 


co 


© 


© 


© 


eo 


Tf 


eo 


© 




CM 


CO 


© 


TTl 


© 


t- 


r-l 


© 


CO 




°L 


lO 


CM 


30 


°l 


rf. 


«o A 




rH 


K +-. CL-rt . ft 






















Aver 
quan 
pum 
per i 
in U 
gall, 




co 


© 


eo 


•<9< 


eo" 


I> 


t-" 


oa 


rH 




■^< 


CO 


lO 


CO 


© 


© 


eo 


© 


h- 






e» 


T-l_ 


iO 


i> 


© 


CM_ 


©_ 


©_ 




cm' 


co" 


»-h" 


co" 


T-T 


TfT 


Tf" 


Tf" 


eo" 




o 


o 


© 




© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




CM 


© 


© 


^f> 


© 


© 


l> 


tH 


■m 


*J £ G CO e 




© 


iO 


CM 


©__ 


°i 


CM_ 


1Q 


00 


(0 


Quant 

pump. 

per mo 

in U. 

galloi 




CO 


I~~" 


; co" 


©" 


eo* 


of 


t-* 


©~ 


CO 




-r 


CO 


uo 


© 


© 


Tf 


CO 


f^ 


i— i 






«o 


1-. 


iO 


l> 


co_ 


i—i 


CM 


©_ 




of 


co" 
cm 


tH 


CM 


tH~ 


T-l 


CM 


oi 

l-H 


CO 

rH 


« ? " 




















mO — O y 


CM 


CM 


CM 


© 


CM 


co 


ift 


eo 


© 




i- 


CO 


CN 


© 


"? 


1Q 


CO 


© 


rH 


.vei 

he, 
clu 
rict 
in f 




; cn 


'. CO 


c4 


T-3 




oi 


■^ 


; "f 


CO 




© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




i-H 


rH 


»-i 


t— ( 




rH 


rH 




rH 


<q bmh - 




















u 


















u .. ** 


















KfW-l f 3 

2 ,*TJ .3 o 


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6 4 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 



TABLE SHOWING AMOUNT OF COAL USED FOR 
WORTHINGTON HIGH DUTY ENGINE AT PUMP- 
ING STATION DURING THE YEAR 1904. 





COAL CONSUMED 


MONTHS 


For Starting 

Fires, 

In Pounds 


When 
Pumping, 
In Pounds 


For Banking 

Fires, 

In Pounds 


Total 
Per Month, 
In Pounds 


January 

February 

March 


2,265 
7,195 


333,141 
258,528 
209,302 


/ 


335,406 
267,623 
209,302 


1,900 


April 

May 

June 








5,614 

259,252 

204,426 

14,356 

207,905 
90,226 




5,6l4 
263,742 
205,626 
16,156 
209,305 
100,626 


3,440 
600 

1,000 
7OO 

4,800 


1,050 
60O 
800 
7O0 

5,600 


July 

August 

October 

November 


December 




6,237 




6,237 








Totals 


20,000 


1,588,987 


10,650 


1,619,637 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 



65 



TABLE SHOWING AMOUNT OF ■ COAL USED FOR 
WORTHINGTON DUPLEX ENGINE AT PUMP- 
ING STATION DURING THE YEAR 1904. 





COAL CONSUMED 


MONTHS 


For Starting 

Fires, 

In Pounds 


When 
Pumping, 
In Pounds 


For Banking 

Fires, 

In Pounds 


Total 
Per Month, 
In Pounds 


March 










5,402 




5,402 






April 

May 

Tune 




62,66l 

3»M4 

55,738 

5,040 

127,766 

54,609 




62,661 












3,!44 

55,738 

5,040 

127,766 ' 

60,794 


July 

September 

October 












t 


4,385 


I,8oo 


November .. 


December 


1,300 


3o,549 


1,300 


33, x 49 


Totals 


5,685 


344,909 


3,IOO 


353,694 



66 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 



TABLE SHOWING AMOUNT OF COAL USED FOR 

MORRIS ENGINE AT PUMPING STATION 

DURING THE YEAR 1904. 





COAL CONSUMED 


MONTHS 


For Starting 

Fires, 

In Pounds 


When 
Pumping, 
In Pounds 


For Banking 

Fires, 

In Pounds 


Total 
Per Month, 
In Pounds 


February 

March 










400 


20,214 

82,706 

209,801 

255,267 


4OO 


2I,OI4 

82,706 


April 

May 

Tune 


2,300 


2,300 


214,401 
255,267 






July 


2,040 


44,745 
217,525 

33,625 
166,769 

274,375 
297,462 




46,785 


September 

October 


3,800 


221,325 

33, 6 25 
175,494 




7,125 
4,200 
1,300 


I,6oO 
4,200 
1,300 


December 


282,775 
300,062 




17,365 


1,602,489 


13,600 


1,633,454 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 



67 



TABLE SHOWING AMOUNT OF COAL USED FOR 

DEANE ENGINES AT PUMPING STATION, 

COOK WELLS, DURING THE YEAR 1904. 





COAL CONSUMED 


MONTHS 


For Starting 

Fires, 

In Pounds 


When 
Pumping, 
In Pounds 


For Banking 

Fires, 

In Pounds 


Total 
Per Month, 
In Pounds 


February 

March 












182,855 

3'.54f 




182,855 
31,540 






April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October .. 
























78,139 










78,139 














November r . 










December .. 




















Totals 




292,534 


• 


292,534 









68 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 



TABLE SHOWING AMOUNT OF COAL USED FOR 

KNOWLES ENGINES AT PUMPING STATION, 

LOWER BOULEVARD, DURING 

THE YEAR 1904. 





COAL CONSUMED 


MONTHS 


For Starting 

Fires, 

In Pounds 


When 
Pumping, 
In Pounds 


For Banking 

Fires, 

In Pounds 


Total 
Per Month, 
In Pounds 


January 

February 

March... 




565,055 

471,750 

434,600 

40,380 




565,055 

471,750 

434,600 

40,380 

15,395 
8,000 










April 

May 

Tune . 








15,395. 




8,000 

396,350 
301,263 
216,363 


July 

October 






396,350 
301,263 
216,363 




' 










November 










December 




256,285 




256,285 








Totals 




2,690,046 


15,395 


2,705,441 







REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 



6 9 



TABLE SHOWING AMOUNT OF COAL USED* FOR 

WORTHINGTON ENGINES AT PUMPING STATION, 

UPPER BOULEVARD, DURING 

THE YEAR 1904. 





COAL CONSUMED 


MONTHS 


For Starting; 

Fires, 

In Pounds 


When 
Pumping, 
In Pounds 


For Banking 

FiVes, 

In Pounds 


Total 
Per Month, 
In Pounds 


January 

February 

March... 


























April 

May 

Tune 




260,300 

308,715 
286,140 




260,300 

308,715 
286,140 










July 

August 














October 




104,438 

268,835 

242,700 

83,800 




104,438 

268,835 

242,700 

83,800 






November 






December 












Totals 




1,554,928 




I,554,9 2 8 









70 REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 



WEST SIXTH STREET PUMPING STATION, WORTH- 

INGTON HIGH DUTY ENGINE, RUNNING 

EXPENSES FOR THE YEAR 1904. 



Pay of Engineers and Firemen $4>i73»55 

206 1958-2000 tons of coal (Cumberland 1903) at $5.084 -j- 1,052.34 

125 914-2000 tons of coal (Sonman Cumb. 1904) at $5. 125 642.97 

26 729-2000 toas of coal (New River Cumb. 1904) at $4,196-)- 110.64 

451 36-2000 tons of coal (New River Cumb. 1904) at $4,062-)- 1,832.27 

312 11-100 gallons of cylinder oil, at $0,526-)- 164.29 

129 72-100 gallons of engine oil, at $0.341 — 44.21 

123 71-100 pounds of packing, at $0.906 — 112.07 

221 3-100 pounds of cotton waste, at $0.125 — 2 7-54 

336 50-100 pounds of castorine and keystone grease, at $0,138-)- 46.44 

54 pounds of tallow, at $0.06 3.24 

Repairs on engines l 99-47 

Repairs on boilers 147.10 

Tools and stock II. 17 

Sundries 60.79 

Total $8,628.09 



Cost of pumping water into reservoir per million gallons, $9.28 — . 
Cost of pumping water one foot high per million gallons, $0.05 64-100. 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 7 1 



WEST SIXTH STREET PUMPING STATION, WORTH- 
INGTON DUPLEX ENGINE, RUNNING 

EXPENSES FOR THE YEAR 1904. 

• 

Pay of Engineers and Firemen $635. 1 1 

11 1998-2000 tons of coal (Cumb. 1903) at #5.084+ 61.01 

25 1470-2000 tons of coal (Sonman Cumb. 1904) at #5.125 131-89 

139 226-2000 tons of coal (New River Cumb. 1904) at #4.062+ 565.15 

47 50-100 gallons of cylinder oil, at #0.526+ 25.00 

19 74-100 gallons of engine oil, at #0.341 — 6.73 

13 3-10 pounds of packing, at #0.576 7.66 

33 63-100 pounds of cotton waste, at #0.125 — 4« x 9 

15 pounds of tallow, at #0.06 .90 

Repairs on boilers 22.38 

Tools and stock 1.70 

Sundries 9> 2 S 

Total :.... #1,470.97 

Cost of pumping water into reservoir per million gallons, #10.89+. 
Cost of pumping water one foot high per millian gallons, #0.06 68-100 — . 



72 REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 



WEST SIXTH STREET PUMPING STATION, MORRIS 

ENGINE, RUNNING EXPENSES FOR 

THE YEAR 1904. 



Pay of Engineers and Firemen $3,992.09 

74 1985-2000 tons of coal (Cumb. 1903) at $5,084 + 381.28 

164 119-2000 tons of coal (Sonman Curab. 1904) at $5.125 840.80 

127 1267-2000 tons of coal (New River Cumb. 1904) at $4,196+ .. 535-°o 

450 83-2000 tons of coal (New River Cumb. 1904) at $4,062+ 1,828.29 

298 54-100 gallons of cylinder oil, at $0,526+ I 57- I 5 

124 8-100 gallons of engine oil, at $0.341 — 42.29 

46 26-100 pounds of packing, at $0,597+ 27.64 

211 42-100 pounds of cotton waste, at $0.125 — 26.34 

27 pounds of tallow, at $0.06 1.62 

Repairs on engine 160.12 

Repairs on boilers 140.70 

Tools and stock 10.68 

Sundries 5^- x 5 

Total $8,202.75 



Cost of pumping water into reservoir per million gallons, $9.34 — . 

Cost of pumping water one foot high per million gallons, $0.05 71-100+. 



O 

S 

o 



Oi 

O 

o 

o 




REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 75 



WEST SIXTH STREET PUMPING STATION, HIGH 

SERVICE ENGINE, RUNNING EXPENSES 

FOR THE YEAR 1904. 



Pay of Engineers and Firemen $272.19 

5 1999-2000 tons of coal (Cumb. 1903), at $5,084+ 3°-5° 

6 867-2000 tons of coal (Sonman Cumb. 1904), at $5,125 3 2 -97 

6 123-2000 tons of coal (New River Cumb. 1904), at $4,196-)- 25,43 

95 260-2000 tons of coal (New River Cumb. 1904), at $4,062-)- 386.47 

20 35-100 gallons of cylinder oil, at $0,526-)- 10.71 

8 46-100 gallons of engine oil, at $0.341 — 2.89 

8 42-100 pounds of packing, at $0,652+ 5.49 

14 42-100 pounds of cotton waste, at $0.125 — 1.80 

Repairs on engine 2.37 

Repairs on boilers 9.59 

Tools and stock .73 

Sundries . 3.96 

Total $785.10 

Cost of pumping water into reservoir per million gallons, $11.52 — . 

Cost of pumping water one foot high per million gallons, .13 93-100+. 



76 REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 



COOK WELLS PUMPING STATION, DEANE ENGINES, 

RUNNING EXPENSES FOR THE 

YEAR 1904. 



Pay of Engineers and Firemen $323.80 

146 534-2000 tons of coal (Sonman Cumb. 1903), at $5. 125 749.62 

50 gallons of kerosene oil for lighting works, at $0.11 5-5° 

49 gallons of cylinder oil, at $0.44 21.56 

5 gallons of engine oil, at $0.35 1.75 

47 5-10 pounds of packing, at $0,348-}- 16.55 

25 pounds of cotton waste, at $0.125 — 3.12 

Repairs on engines 36.90 

Repairs on boilers 82.35 

Tools and stock 41-83 

Sundries 40.02 

Total $1,323.00 



Cost of pumping water into distributing mains per million gallons, $20.69 — • 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 77 



LOWER BOULEVARD PUMPING STATION, KNOWLES 

ENGINES, RUNNING EXPENSES FOR 

THE YEAR 1904. 



Pay of Engineers and Firemen $4,564.00 

755 1785-2000 tons of coal (Cumb. 1903), at $7,646 , 5,779-55 

589 261-2000 tons of coal (New River Cumb. 1904), at $4,241-)- 2,498.54 

400 gallons of kerosene oil for lighting works, at $0.114 — 45-5° 

139 gallons of cylinder oil, at $0,456-)- 63.43 

25 5-10 gallons of engine oil, at $0.35 8.92 

36 56-100 pounds of packing, at $0,753-)- 27.53 

178 pounds of cotton waste, at $0.122 — 21.65 

Repairs on engines 152. n 

Repairs on boilers 489.76 

Tools and stock ,; 44-41 

Sundries 88.32 

Total , $13,783.72 



Cost of pumping water into conduit per million gallons, $11.90- 



78 REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 



UPPER BOULEVARD PUMPING STATION, WORTH- 

INGTON ENGINES, RUNNING EXPENSES 

FOR THE YEAR 1904. 



Pay for Engineers and Firemen $2,390.46 

284 1015-2000 tons of coal (Cumb. 1903), at $5. 105 1,452.41 

492 1913-2000 tons of coal (New River Cumb. 1904), at $4,241+ ... 2,090.66 

200 gallons of kerosene oil for lighting works, at $0.11 22.00 

100 gallons of cylinder oil, at $0.44 44.00 

2 5 5 _I ° gallons of engine oil, at $0.35 8.93 

24 pounds of packing, at $0.50 12.00 

100 pounds of cotton waste, at $0.125 I2 -5° 

Repairs on engines 66.30 

Sundries I 3-OQ 

Total $6,112.26 



Cost of pumping water into conduit per million gallons, $6.99 — . 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 



79 



RESERVOIR, BEACON STREET, 1904. 



MONTHS 


Depth in Feet 


Quantity in 
U. S. Gallons 


Temperature in Degrees 


Of Water 


Of Air 


February 

March 

April 

May 

June 


19.23 

I9.I4 
19.88 
18.99 

19-77 

19.54 

20.02 

19.17 

19-33 
20.13 

20.06 
19.12 


29, 2I 4,777 
29,073,894 
30,314,657 
28,820,379 
30, 133,3*4 
29,741, 9 J 9 
30,544,123 
29,126,875 

29,394,913 
30,740,108 

30,623,047 
29,043,229 


44.42 
40.28 
39.16 

38.33 
40.I3 
46.87 
49.61 
56.61 
59.23 

59-44 
54.5o 
5o.97 


20.24 

20.31 

35.02 

43.64 

61-33 
65.21 

72.15 

68.73 
6l.Il 

48.72 
36.17 

24-59 


My 

October 

November 



8o 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 



TABLE SHOWING THE AVERAGE MONTHLY AND 

DAILY CONSUMPTION OF WATER FOR 

THE YEAR 1904. 



MONTHS 



January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

Totals and Averages 



Gallons per Month 



206,313,551 
208,470,047 
172,202,020 

143,755,543 
161,841,904 

166,869,926 

172,883,755 

159,220,706 

162,510,706 

I53.HS.743 
137,426,597 
162,987,781 



2,007,628,279 



Gallons per Day 



6,655,276 
7,188,622 

5,554,904 
4,791,851 
5,220,707 

5,502,331 
5,576,895 

5,136,152 
5,417,024 
4,940,185 
4,580,887 
5,257,670 



5,485,3 2 3 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 8 1 



The following table shows the average daily con- 
sumption of water, in gallons, for each month and each 
year since the installation of the system. 



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REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 83 



SUMMARY OF STATISTICS. 

For the Year Ending December 31, 1904. 

In form recommended by the New England Water Works 

Association. 



LOWELL WATER WORKS. 

Lowell, Middlesex County, Massachusetts. 

GENERAL STATISTICS. 

Population by census of 1900, 94,969. 

Date of construction, 1870, to 1873. 

Date of construction, High Service, 1881. 

Date of construction, Driven wells, 1893 to I 9°3- 

By whom owned : The City of Lowell. 

Source of supply : Two hundred ten (210) driven wells in the 

valley of River Meadow Brook, and three hundred forty-five 

(345) driven wells at Pawtucket Boulevard. 
Mode of supply : Pumping to reservoir and pumping direct. 

PUMPING STATISTICS. 
I. Builders of Pumping Machinery. 

At West Sixth Street Station. 

One engine, capacity 5,000,000' gallons in 24 hours, Henry 

G. Morris. 
One engine, capacity 5,000,000 gallons in 24 hours, Henry 

R. Worthington. 



84 REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 

One engine, capacity 10,000,000 gallons in 24 hours, Henry 

R. Worthington. 
One engine, capacity 500,000 gallons in 24 hours, Henry 

R. Worthington. 

At Cook Wells Station, Temporary Pumps. 

One engine, capacity 3,000,000 gallons in 24 hours, The Deane 

Steam Pump Co. 
One engine, capacity 3,000,000 gallons in 24 hours, The Deane 

Steam Pump Co. 

At Lower Boulevard Station, Temporary Pumps. 

One engine, capacity 3,000,000 gallons in 24 hours, Knowles 

Steam Pump Works. 
One engine, capacity 3,000,000 gallons in 24 hours, Knowles 

Steam Pump Works. 
One engine, capacity 3,000,000 gallons in 24 hours, Knowles 

Steam Pump Works. 

At Upper Boulevard Station, Temporary Pumps. 

One engine, capacity 3,000,000 gallons in 24 hours, Henry 

R. Worthington. 
One engine, capacity 3,000,000 gallons in 24 hours, Henry 

R. Worthington. 

a. Kind, bituminous. 

b. Brand of coal, — Sonman and 
New River. * 

c. Average price of coal per 
gross ton, delivered, $4.75+ 

d. Percentage of ash. 

e. Wood, price per cord. 

3. Coal consumed for the year, 8,386,937 pounds. 

(Low Service, West Sixth Street Station, 3,606,785 
pounds). 

4. (Pounds of wood) -f- 3 = equivalent amount of coal = 2,400, 

West Sixth Street Station. 



2. Description of fuel used : < 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 85 

5. Total equivalent coal consumed for the year — (3) + (4), 

8)389,337 pounds. (Low Service, West Sixth Street 
Station, 3,609,185 pounds). 

6. Total pumpage for the year, 2,007,487,767 gallons. 

7. Average static head against which pumps work, 156.30 feet, 

West Sixth Street Station. 

8. Average dynamic head against which pumps work, 163.97 

feet, West Sixth Street Station. 

9. Number of gallons pumped per pound of equivalent coal (5), 

239. (Low Service, West Sixth Street Station, 538). 

_ Gals, pumped (6) X 8. 34 (lbs. ) X 100 X dynamic head (8) 

Total fuel consumed (5) 

= 73,640,173. West Sixth Street Station, Low Service. 

Cost of pumping figured on pumping station expenses, 

viz: $39,520.79. 

11. Per million gallons pumped, $19.69 — Low Service. 

12. Per million gallons raised one foot (dynamic), $0.1201 — Low 

Service. 



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REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 87 

STATISTICS OF CONSUMPTION OF WATER. 

1. Estimated total population at date, — 104,400. 

2. Estimated population on lines of pipe. (Estimated total 

population used). 

3. Estimated population supplied. (Estimated total population 

used). 

4. Total consumption for the year, — 2,007,628,279 gallons. 

5. Passed through meters, — 875,780,355 gallons. 

6. Percentage of consumption metered, — 43 62-100. 

7. Average daily consumption, — 5,485,323 gallons. 

8. Gallons per day to each inhabitant, — 52 5-10. 

9. Gallons per day to each consumer, — 52 5-10 nearly. 

10. Gallons per day to each tap, — 486. 

11. Cost of supplying water, per million gallons, figured on total 

maintenance (item C. C. ) $44.01. 

12. Total cost of supplying water, per million gallons, figured on 

total maintenance + interest on bonds, — $66.74. 

STATISTICS RELATING TO DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM. 

Mains. 

1. Kind of pipe, cast iron. 

2. Sizes, from 4 inch to 30 inch. 

3. Extended 5706 feet during year. 
5. Total now in use, — 133,67 miles. 

8. Length of pipes less than 4 inches diameter — 2 miles, more 

or less. 

9. Number of hydrants added during the year (public and 

private) 11. 

10. Number of hydrants (public and private) now in use, — 1212. 

11. Number of stop gates added during the year, — 26. 

12. Number of stop gates now in use, — 1331. 

13. Number of stop gates smaller than 4 inch, — 25. 

14. Number of blow-offs, — 34. 

15. Range of pressure on mains, 17 lbs. to 72 lbs. Low Service. 

Services. 

16. Kind of pipe, Lead, Lead-lined iron, Iron and Tin-lined iron. 

17. Sizes, s/ 8 " to 2". 

18. Extended, 6,638 feet. 



88 REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 

20. Total now in use, — 84.4 miles. 

21. Number of service traps added during the year, — 178. 

22. Number now in use, — 1 1, 287. 

23. Average length of Service, — 39.48 feet. 

24. Average cost of service for the year, — $27.52. 

25. Number of meters added, — 277. 

26. Number now in use, — 7,513. 

27. Percentage of services metered, — 63.5. 

28. Percentage of receipts from metered water (B 4- C), 79. 



The State Board of Health has made analyses of water each 
month from the Merrimack River (for record only), and wells at 
Pawtucket Boulevard; a record of which is annexed. 

On August 24, 1903, your Board' voted to refer to the City 
Engineer and Superintendent of Water Works the whole matter 
relative to supplying the Locks and Canals Company with water 
for fire purposes in such a manner as to prevent a repetition of the 
disaster of July 18, 1903, when the city water was polluted by 
River water being pumped into the city mains. 

After consulting with the Engineer of the Locks and Canals 
Company, it was decided to remove all the connections between 
the pipes of their system and that of the City of Lowell, and then 
to allow them to use river water. 

On May 13, 1904, an agreement was signed by the Mayor 
allowing them to substitute a 24 inch pipe for a 12 inch pipe, 
leading from their reservoir on Lynde's Hill through Fairmount, 
Mansur, Nesmith and East Merrimack Streets, across Concord 
River, to their pipe in Merrimack Square. This agreement 
provides ' ' That the pipe shall be laid in a line and at grade 
approved by the City Engineer and in a manner satisfactory to him." 

This has been done and your Board may congratulate itself on 
the successful solution of a problem, which has made possible the 
permanent removal of these dangerous connections. 

In conclusion, I wish to thank you for your earnest co-opera- 
tion and for the many courtesies I have received from you during 

' Respectfully submitted, 

GEORGE BOWERS, 

City Engineer. 



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CITY OF LOWELL. 



1905. 

REPORT 



OF THE 



COMMITTEE ON APPROPRIATION. 



City Hall, Lowell, Mass., March 6, 1905. 
To the City Council: — 

The Joint Standing Committee on Appropriations 
have considered the various department estimates for 
the year 1905, and respectfully submit herewith its 
report in accordance with the Ordinance. 

To your Committee it seems, from the conditions 
which confronted us, that the City of Lowell is stagger- 
ing under the weight of a burden which succeeding 
years increase rather than lessen. It would not be sur- 
prising if in an occasional year the City had failed to 
make a good showing, but we are face to face with the 
fact that every year seems to bring on a greater load 
of responsibility than the previous one. The result is a 
tax rate that every honest citizen regrets. 



Your Committee at the outset started on a line of 
inquiry and investigation that, we are sure, will correct 
to some extent the evils we are satisfied exist at the 
present time. 

Several visits to the Assessors' office, where are 
compiled the official records of valuations and abate- 
ments, brought to light a condition of affairs which 
warranted us in unanimously deciding to probe further. 
The City Treasurer was asked for a list containing 
certain information for the years 1900, 1901, 1902 and 
1903, and, on authority of the City Solicitor, he declined 
to give the same. The City Solicitor informed your 
Committee that such a list could only come by a direct 
order of the City Council itself. Realizing that the 
welfare of the citizens of Lowell was at stake, we had 
an order prepared (and approved by City Solicitor 
William A. Hogan), calling on the Treasurer to give 
the list alluded to. This order was passed by the City 
Council by practically an unanimous vote, and your 
Committee was gratified at the manner in which it was 
received by the members of both branches. It is our 
intention to investigate matters contained in the list as 
soon as it is received. 

A few figures will show the problem that con- 
fronted the Committee at the outset. 

The total estimated revenue from all sources this 
year is $1,310,123.04, a decrease of about $9,000. from 
last year. In fact, the decrease is much greater than 
that, because this year's revenue includes the insurance 
money of $60,000., which is not an ordinary revenue, 
but one due to the burning of Huntington Hall. For 
this reason your Committee did not feel justified in 



3 



devoting the $60,000. to department appropriations, 
especially in view of the fact that the City may soon 
deem it wise, or perhaps obligatory, to rebuild Hunting- 
ton Hall. For that reason the $60,000. is allowed to 
remain in the General Treasury Fund, so that it will 
be available at any moment for a new hall. This plan 
we believe much preferable to devoting the $60,000. to 
department needs and later being obliged to borrow for 
a hall if one is built. Therefore, our real shortage in 
revenue this year, compared to last year, is very close 
to $70,000. 

The department expenses in 19(J4 were about 
$136,000. more than the previous year ; yet, as above 
stated, revenues are growing less. The General 
Treasury Fund revenue, including Huntington Hall 
insurance money, is estimated for 3 905 at $452,489.70, 
which is over $5,000. less than last year, and, if Hunt- 
ington Hall insurance money is eliminated, as we 
believe it should be, the difference is over $65,000. 
There seems to be a general decrease in revenues from 
first to last and but very few items show an increase. 

The estimated revenue derived from taxation is 
nearly $4,000. less than last year, and it follows of 
course that the real and personal valuation is some- 
what lower, even though we fail to see why it should be. 

At the beginning of the year 1904, the General 
Treasury Fund showed a balance of $4,600. ; January 
1,1903, there was a deficit of $1,043.50 ; January 1,1902, 
a balance of $16,982.87, and January 1, 1901, a balance 
of $8,000. On the first day of the present year the 
General Treasury Fund, instead of showing a balance, 
as it almost invariably has shown, at the beginning of 



the year, showed a deficit of $9,705.30. The greatest 
single decrease in the items making up the General 
Treasury Fund estimated revenue is on Corporation Tax, 
which dropped from nearly $90,000.00 in 1904 to $67,000. 
in 1905. There were other decreases, though not so 
large, and a few items show slight increases. 

The total department estimates this year exceed by 
$243,000. the total amount available, leaving out of 
course Huntington Hall insurance money, so it became 
necessary for vour Committee to cut $243,000., or nearly 
a quarter of a million. This was about $8,000. more 
than it was necessary to cut last year. The total amount 
recommended for departments is $64,000. less than last 
year. 

We are pleased to call attention to the fact that 
fixed charges for 1905 are $14,458. less than last year, 
and this is due to the fact that City Debt payments have 
decreased by $7,958.60, Sinking Funds $6,000., and 
Interest #500. 

Your Committee noticed that several heads of de- 
partments asked for increases in pay of clerks. These 
were undoubtedly worthy cases, and we regretted that 
we could not favor the increases asked. We took the 
position that the clerks have steady work the entire year, 
and that any spare money that might be found could 
with much better grace be added to the various appro- 
priations for labor, remembering that the city laborer 
averages not more than three days' work a week, if he 
does that. 

The Fire Department asked for an appropriation 
sufficiently large to allow the addition of 12 permanent 
men, and this was one demand your Committee could 



not possibly ignore. The best we could do was to rec- 
ommend an appropriation for seven additional perma- 
nent men, but we regret that we could not recommend 
more. 

Among the places visited was the Health Depart- 
ment stable, and we were shocked to see some of the 
worn-out, diseased horses upon which the Department 
depends for its work. This is no reflection upon the 
management, for with the appropriations given from 
year to year an excellent showing has been made. 

If the Agent of the Humane Societv had been 
apprised of the condition of these animals, he would 
long ago have condemned at least six of them to death. 

We have recommended an appropriation large 
enough to cover the cost of six new horses. 

We desire to herein voice our disapproval of the 
method of conducting the City Library. This depart- 
ment, which, by a most unwise law, is a corporation 
entirely apart from the City of Lowell, was given an 
appropriation last year of $16,000. This appropriation 
was exceeded by $2,612.92., and an appropriation of 
$18,500 was asked this year. The income from the 
Davis bequest amounts to about $3,000 annually, and 
we believe an appropriation of $13,000 with that amount, 
is sufficient for the present year. Acting under orders, 
the Librarian informed us that the Trustees did not 
believe in spending the Davis income for running 
expenses, but for " the making of a better library." 
We hope the Trustees will find that by using the Davis 
income for running expenses they will have " a better 
library" than if they depended on the City Council 
appropriation alone. 



6 

Your Committee visited the City Farm and found 
many repairs needed. An estimate was given by the 
Superintendent of Public Buildings, and, with few- 
exceptions, we have been able to recommend something 
for every item he called absolutely necessary. 

With the exception of the School Department, the 
appropriations recommended are, we believe, sufficient 
to last the entire year, and we would recommend the 
removal of any department head who, without good 
and sufficient cause, exceeds his appropriation. For 
the School Department we have recommended $197,000. 
and we will be pleased to later recommend an addi- 
tional $74,000. This will make the whole appropria- 
tion $271,000., and we believe that sufficient for the 
year. 

Your Committee w T ould earnestly recommend that 
a strict watchfulness be kept on the matter of loans 
during the current year. City Debt and Sinking Fund 
payments are on the decrease, and we can see some 
relief ahead if interest is kept down to the lowest 
possible figure and decreased substantially every year. 

The total amount recommended for departments 
is $1,244,606.13 and this will leave a balance of 
$5,461.67 in the General Treasury Fund, besides, the 
Huntington Hall insurance money. 



Estimated Revenue, 1905, 

Valuation real and personal 

property, 1904 $71,614,907 00 

Deduct abatements, 1904.... 153,795 00 



$71,461,112 00 
Multiply by $12 per $1,000 

of valuation 12.00 



Estimated Revenue Based on Revenue 
for 1904 

Incidentals $3,500 00 

City Cemeteries 8,100 00 

City Clerk 1,400 00 

City Weigher 200 00 

City Sealer 340 00 

City Treasurer 3,000 00 

Corporation Tax 67,000 00 

Fire Department 150 00 

Health Department 4,000 00 

Inspector of Milk 125 00 

Insurance Huntington Hall.. 60,000 00 

Liquor Licenses 172,000 00 

Military Aid ^ 

Soldiers' Relief t 18,000 00 

State Aid ) 

Park Department 1,000 00 

Pauper Dept. (Almshouse).. 1,000 00 

Pauper Dept.( Outdoor Relief) 5,000 00 

Police Department 15,000 00 

Public Buildings 2,500 00 

School Department 6,000 00 

Sewer Construction 17,000 00 

Street Department 9,000 00 

Watering Streets 18,000 00 

Interest 25,000 00 

National Bank Tax 8,750 00 

Excise Tax 7,000 00 



$857,533 34 



8 



Estimated Revenue Based on Revenue 
for 1904 

Armory Rent 1,200 00 

Street Railway Tax 8,000 00 

Lighting Department 30 00 

.$462,295 00 
Less General Treasury Fund 

Deficiency 1905 9,705 30 

Total Estimated Revenue for 
the year 1905 



$ 452,589 70 



$1,310,123 04 



Department Expenses for 1904 — Estimates for 1905 — Amount 

Recommended by Committee on Appropriations, 

Department Department Committee 

Expenses Estimates Recommends 

1904 1905 1905 

Assessors $ 13,681 71 $14,700 00 $14,183 00 

Auditor 3,967 84 4,086 00 3,957 00 

Care of City Hall 7,231 50 7,198 25 7,198 25 

City Cemeteries 8,971 63 11,000 00 9,000 00 

City Clerk 5,69103 6,528 00 5,69100 

City Treasurer 11,362 85 11,548 00 11,440 00 

City Sealer 416 65 420 00 416 00 

City Weigher 818 50 825 00 818 00 

City Messenger 3,150 05 3,150 16 3,150 00 

Clerk of Committees 1,340 85 1,400 00 1,400 00 

Clerk of Common Council 300 00 300 00 300 00 

Elections 13,302 25 13,607 00 13,000 00 

Engineering 15,033 45 7,500 00 7,300 00 

Fire Department 135,780 00 144,313 75 138,988 00 

Fish Warden 40 00 40 00 40 00 

Health Department, Office 11,756 26 11,923 00 11,456 00 

Health Department, Yard 34,695 71 35,504 00 34,735 00 

Heating C. H. & M. B 7,928 38 7,900 00 7,900 00 

Huntington Hall 4,556 08 750 00 750 00 

Incidentals 2,573 61 2,800 00 2,800 00 

Insurance 5,287 77 2,461 64 2,461 64 



9 



Department 

Expenses 

1904 

Inspector of Milk and Vinegar. 2,344 87 
Inspection of Animals and 

Provisions 500 00 

Inspection of Wires 2,865 74 

Law Department 5,542 25 

Library 17,475 89 

Liquor Licenses 42,974 00 

Lighting Department 101,369 1C 

Mayor's Department 4,393 47 

Park Department 13,095 85 

Pauper Dept. (Almshouse).... 71,621 03 

Pauper Dept.( Outdoor Relief). 53,107 01 

Poundkeeper 5 00 

Police Department 145,854 28 

Public Buildings 29,869 17 

Registrars of Voters 4,085 51 

Rifle Range 990 81 

School Department 299,532 79 

School Houses 71,689 60 

Sewer Maintenance 27,114 90 

State Aid Department 30,046 68 

Sewer Construction 115,989 42 

Street Department 216,482 71 

Supply Department 6,367 21 

Tax Cases 292 50 

Watering Streets 16,855 77 

Waterworks 181,298 24 

Totals .$1,749,649 92 



Department 
Estimates 
1905 


Committee 

Recommends 

1905 


2,405 25 


2,355 25 


500 00 


500 00 


2,726 00 


2,628 00 


6,624 00 


6,538 00 


18,500 00 


13,000 00 


43,000 00 


43,000 00 


107,902 82 


101,370 00 


4,600 00 


4,600 00 


16,200 00 


13,544 00 


63,823 94 


54,500 00 


49,631 00 


43,533 00 


5 00 


5 00 


144,649 91 


144,149 91 


38,170 50 


26,370 50 


5,491 00 


4,550 00 


1,000 00 


700 00 


306,000 00 


197,000 00 


88,379 00 


62,000 00 


28,060 60 


22,939 00 


30,500 00 


30,020 00 


221,417 75 


173,500 00 


6,510 44 


6,319 58 



20,039 30 15,500 00 



.,493,091 31 |1,244,606 13 



Summary of Anticipated Receipts and Appropriations, 1905 

Amount which assessors are directed to raise 

by taxation $1,291,900 00 

Revenue Estimated 452,589 70 

$1,744,489 70 

Fixed Charges 434,421 90 

Appropriated for Departments 1,244,606 13 

$1,679,028 03 

Balance left in General Treasury Fund 65,461 67 



10 

Your Committee introduce the accompanying Joint 
Orders and recommend the adoption of the same. 
Respectfully submitted, 

THOMAS H. BRADEN, Chairman. 

ALBERT F. GRANT, 

DANIEL COSGROVE, 
WILLIAM H. DODGE, 

HARRY H. J. READ, 

ANDREW McALOON, 

CHARLES F. MORSE, 

Committee on Appropriations. 



11 

CITY OF LOWELL. 

In Board of Aldermen. 

Order to Appropriate Money to meet Fixed Charges and 
Current Expenses. 

Ordered, if the Common Council concur, That the 
following sums amounting to one million, six hundred 
seventy-nine thousand, twenty-eight dollars and three 
cents ($1,679,028.03) be and they are hereby appropriated 
to meet the Fixed Charges and Current Expenses of 
the City of Lowell for the year beginning January 1, 
1905, and ending December 31, 1905. 

Assessors. 

Salaries $12,535 00 

Sundries 1,648 00 

$14,183 00 

Auditor. 

Salaries 3,516 00 

Sundries 441 00 

3,957 00 

Care of City Hall. 

Labor 5,294 50 

Police Officer 1,003 75 - 

Sundries 900 00 

7,198 25 

City Cemeteries 9,000 00 

City Clerk. 

Salaries 4,628 00 

Sundries 1,063 00 

5,691 00 

City Treasurer. 

Salaries 7,340 00 

Sundries 4,100 00 

11,440 00 

City Sealer. 

Salary 350 00 

Sundries 66 00 

416 00 



* 



12 

City Weigher. 

Salary 800 00 

Sundries 18 00 

City Messenger. 

Salary 1,200 00 

Sundries 400 00 

Lighting City Hall and Memorial Building. 1,550 00 



Health Department. Yard. 

Labor 28,637 00 

Sundries ,. 6,098 00 



818 00 



3,150 00 



Clerk of Committees. 

Salary 1,200 00 

Sundries 200 00 

1,400 00 

Clerk of Common Council 300 00 

Elections 13,000 00 



(Principal Election Officers $8 per day, 
Deputies $1 per day.) 

Engineering 7,300 00 

Fire Department. 

Salaries and labor 111,338 00 

Sundries 24,450 00 

Repairs No. 4 and 6 Engines 3,200 00 

138,988 00 

Fish Warden 40 00 

Pound Keeper 5 00 

Health Department. Office. 

Salaries and labor 9,135 00 

Sundries 2,321 00 



11,456 00 



34,735 00 



Heating City Hall and Memorial Building. 

Labor 3,000 00 

Fuel 4,300 00 

Sundries 600 00 

7,900 00 

Huntington Hall 750 00 

Rifle Range 700 00 

Incidentals 2,800 00 



13 

Insurance 2,461 64 

Milk and Vinegar. 

Salaries 2,205 25 

Sundries 150 00 

2,355 25 

Inspector of Animals and Provisions 500 00 

Inspector of Wires. 

Salaries 2,226 00 

Sundries 402 00 

2,628 00 

Law Department. 

Salaries 4,824 00 

Sundries 714 00 

5,538 00 

Library 13,000 00 

Lighting Department. 

Lighting Streets 100,195 00 

Lighting Public Buildings 21 00 

Labor sundries 1,154 00 

101,370 00 

Liquor Licenses 43,000 00 

Mayor. 

Salaries 4,200 00 

Sundries 400 00 



Park Department. 

Salaries and labor 9,000 00 

Sundries 3,544 00 

Care of trees 1,000 00 

Paupers (Almshouse). 

Salaries • 2,700 00 

Labor 10,000 00 

Grain, groceries and provisions 23,000 00 

Sundries 18,800 00 

Paupers (Outdoor relief). 

Salaries 3,785 00 

Office sundries and transportation 700 00 

General sundries 39,048 00 

Police Department. 

Salaries of Police Board and Clerk 5,000 00 

Salaries and labor, Police Department 133,149 91 

Sundries 6,000 00 



4,600 00 



13,544 00 



54,500 00 



43,533 00 



144,149 91 



14 



Public Buildings Department. 

Salaries 2,736 00 

Labor, carpenters, painters, etc 8,239 00 

Janitor, Police Station 912 50 

Asst. Janitor, Police Station 477 00 

Janitor, Memorial Hall 702 00 

Sundries, board of horses 1,305 00 

Electric power 254 00 

Work not done by Department 4,500 00 

Materials 3,800 00 

Painting City Hall 1,000 00 

Repairing Palmer Street engine house 1,000 00 

City Farm Repairs. 

12 double windows hung in female hospital. 240 00 

16 new windows in male dining room 160 00 

New sheathing door from barn yard to 

hospital yard 10 00 

New floor in cow stable 300 00 

Refrigerator repairs 250 00 

2 new doors 20 00 

Electric wiring 250 00 

Screens for hospitals 115 00 

Taking gratings from female hospital 100 00 

Registrars of Voters. 

Salaries and labor 3,850 00 

Sundries 700 00 

Schools 

School Houses 

Sewer Maintenance. 

Salaries 2,939 00 

Labor 12,000 00 

Sundries 8,000 00 

State Aid. 

Salaries and sundries 2,020 00 

Military Aid 4,000 00 

Soldiers' Relief 9,000 00 

State Aid 15,000 00 



26,370 50 



4,550 00 

197,000 00 
62,000 00 



22,939 00 



80,020 00 



15 



Streets. 

Salaries 4,000 00 

Yard labor 11,000 00 

Care of streets 100,000 00 

New sidewalks 7,500 00 

Sidewalk repairs 4,000 00 

Sundries 47,000 00 



Supply Department. 

Salaries and labor 5,444 58 

Sundries 875 00 



173,500 00 



6,319 58 
Watering Streets. 

Labor 5,000 00 

Sundries 10,500 00 

15,500 00 

Department total $1,244,606 13 

FIXED CHARGES. 

City Debt $267,621 90 

Interest 134,500 00 

Sinking Funds 32,300 00 

434,421 90 



Total $1,679,028 03 

LIMIT OF INDEBTEDNESS. 

Limit of municipal debt for 1905, 

2k % on $71,601,535 67 (average 

valuation for last three years) $1,790,038 40 

Total city debt, Dec. 31, 1904 $3,479,680 00 

Deduct Water Loans $1,162,300 00 

Deduct exemptions by Legislature 800,000 00 

1,962,300 00 



City Debt as it relates to limit of 

indebtedness $1,517,380 00 

Distance from limit, Jan. 1, 1905.. 



City Debt $275,580 50 

Interest 

Sinking Funds 



1U ATJOFS 




$272,658 40 


1904 


1905 


Decrease 


£275,580 50 


$267,621 90 


$7,958 60 


135,000 00 


134,500 00 


500 00 


38,300 00 


32,300 00 


6,000 00 



$448,880 50 $434,421 90 $14,458 60 



CITY OF LOWELL. 

In Board of Aldermen. 
Order relating to Report of Committee on Appropriations. 
Ordered, if the Common Council concur, That a 
sufficient number of copies of the report of the Committee 
on Appropriations be printed for, and that they be 
included in, the published volumes of the Lowell City 
Documents for the year 1905, the expense of the printing 
to be charged to the Appropriation for Incidentals. 



CITY OF LOWELL. 

In Board of Aldermen. 

Order to Assess Taxes for the year Nineteen Hundred 
and Five. 

Ordered, if the Common Council concur : 

First. — That the Board of Assessors of the City 
of Lowell be, and they are hereby instructed to raise the 
sum of One Million, Two Hundred Ninety-one Thousand, 
Nine Hundred Dollars ($1,291,900.00) by assessment upon 
Polls and Estates of the Inhabitants of the City of Lowell, 
and Estates of Non-Resident Proprietors, according to law, 
to defray the current expenses of the City for the financial 
year beginning January 1, 1905. and ending December 31, 
1905. 

Second. — That interest at the rate of six per 
centum per annum shall be charged on all taxes under 
this order which remain unpaid on and after the twentieth 
day of October, 1905, until the same shall be paid, and 
such interest shall be added to and be considered a part 
of said Taxes. 

Third. — That a copy of this Order shall be fur- 
nished to the Board of Assessors by the City Clerk within 
ten days after the approval of the same. 



Annual Report 



OF THE 



Overseers of the Poor 



FOR THE 



City of Lowell 



With Accompanying Papers 



For Municipal Year 



1904 




LOWELL, MASS. 



Buokland Printing Company 
1905 



Overseers of Poor 
1904 



MARTIN F. CONLEY 

Chairman 

EDWARD H. FOYE EDWIN S. EASTMAN 

WILLIAM J. DUNN VITAL ROBERTS 

JOHN F. McCOY CHAS. E. TILTON 

JOHN J. DUFF P. J. McDERMOTT 

Secretary and Superintendent of Outdoor Poor 
MARTIN J. COURTNEY - City Hall 

Hours 9 a. m. to 4 P. M. 

Superintendent of City Hospital and Almshouse 
Dr. CHARLES E. DONLAN - - - Almshouse 



Officials and Employees of the Department 



Secretary's Office 
CLERKS 

Nellie A. Keyes William H. Gallagher 

City Dispensary 
Edwin F. Mason - - - - - - Pharmacist 

City Hall, Hours 9,30 a. m. to 1 p. m., 2.30 to 5 p. m. 

Ambulance Physician 
Dr. Patrick E. Sullivan - - Associate Building 

3 



City Physician 



Dr. Forster H. Smith 



805 Merrimack Street 







Dispensary Physicians 


District One 


Dr. 


T. Halloran 


" Two 


Dr. 


A. J. Halpin 


44 Three 


Dr. 


J. Boyle 


" Four 


Dr. 


O. P. Porter 


" Five 


Dr. 


J. E. Leary 


u Six 


Dr. 


P. Brunelle 



4 Runels Building 
Swan Building 
Wamesit St. 
253 Central St. 
Associate Building 
35 E. Merrim'k St. 

A physician will be in attendance at the City Dispensary, 
City Hall, every day, except Sundays and Holidays, from 11 a. m. 
to 12 m. Patients unable to get to the Dispensary will be treated 
at their homes on a line from Secretary's Office. 

Lowell City Hospital and Almshouse 

CHELMSFORD STREET 



Dr. Charles E. Donlan 
John J. Mahoney 



Superintendent 
Clerk 



Committees — Overseers of Poor, 1904 



Accounts — Conley, McCoy amd Dunn. 
Repairs — Conley, McCoy and Foye. 
Agriculture — McDermott, Dunn and Tilton. 
Clothing — Duff, Roberts and Conley. 
Dispensary — Foye, McCoy and Duff. 
Printing — Duff, Conley and Eastman. 
Out Door Relief — McDermott, Foye and McCoy. 
Provisions and Supplies — Duff, Tilton and Foye. 
Wood Yard — Dunn, Conley and Roberts. 
Insurance — Foye, Duff and Tilton. 



Office of the Overseers of the Poor, 
City Hall, January 5, 1905. 



To His Honor the Mayor, and the Honorables, the Members 
of the City Council, Lowell, Mass. 

Gentlemen: — In accordance with the provisions of the 
City Charter, I herewith present the following as the report 
of the Overseers of the Poor department for the fiscal year 
1904. 

MARTIN F. CONLEY, Chairman, 

For the Overseers of Poor. 



REPORT OF THE SECRETARY 



OF THE 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR 



To the Board of Overseers of the Poor, 
Lowell, Mass. 

Gentlemen : — 

In compliance with the rules of your board I herewith 
present my annual report as Supt. of Out Door Poor for 
the year 1904. In some respects the year was a memorable 
one, inasmuch as it marked the beginning of two distinct 
changes in the laws governing the workings of this depart- 
ment, namely, the removal of our control and supervision 
from all insane cases and the discontinuance of the Work- 
house at the City Institutions. . The first mentioned law, 
placing all insane under State control, was passed in 1900 
and became operative January 1, 1904 and the other was 
passed by last year's legislature and became operative October 
1, 1904. In the other branches of the department 1904 can 
be taken as a normal year and' the expenditures represent a 
fair average under our present system of doing business. 

As the department seems to be very much in the public 



eye at present and criticism and censure appear to be the 
only offerings due us, I have decided to go into a little 
more detail than usual so that a more intelligent idea of our 
expenses can be had and a better idea of our work can be 
formed. That the amount yearly expended can be greatly 
reduced without entailing any suffering I do not deny and I 
have repeatedly called this fact to your attention. But that 
we merit all the unkind things said about us I do deny and 
claim that we are like every other pauper department in 
the state, striving for the minimum in expenditures. How- 
ever, the millennium has not yet been reached and the 
minimum is still far in the small end of the perspective. 

In Memoriam 

At the outset of the year the department sustained a 
severe loss in the death of James F. Walsh, the chief clerk 
in the office. For twenty years he occupied that position 
and the excellence of the records he leaves behind serve as 
a monument to testify to his great efficiency. He was a man 
of sterling qualities and of much natural ability ; to these 
were added a good education, a thorough knowledge of his 
work and a familiarity with the geneology of Lowell's poor 
such as no man among us can hope to posses. He was 
conscientious in his dealings with all and the essence of loyalty 
to his official superiors. In his death the city lost a servant 
whose place can never be entirely filled. While mourning 
the occasion I gratefully embrace this opportunity to pay a 
well deserved tribute to one, whose existence and endeavors 
are now but fading memories but whose life's work will 
always, live in the annals of this department and shine out 
on the pages of its history with a brilliancy that proclaims 
its work well and faithfully done. 

8 



The Office 

The volume of business transacted in the office is enor- 
mous and is constantly on the increase. The amount of 
detail work necessary to comply with the pauper laws and 
to ensure complete records, takes considerable time, not to 
speak of the great number of people constantly in attendance 
whose wants have to be listened to. It is sate to say that 
there is not a busier office in the building than ours nor is 
there another to which more people come in the course of 
a year. The work is of a complicated, intricate character 
and any neglect of it is followed by great expense to the 
city. It is work that won't wait and must be kept up. 
The following figures will serve to give you an idea of 
some of the work accomplished last year. 

The number of notices sent to other cities and towns by us, 
claiming settlements for persons found in this city was 119. Of 
this number 56 were renewal of notices on acknowledged cases 
and 63 were for new cases. Of the last number 47 settlements 
were admitted and 16 denied. The number of notices received by 
us, claiming settlements in this city for people found in other 
places throughout the state was 154. Of this number 38 were 
renewals on people we had already found to have settlements here, 
66 new claims were acknowledged and 50 were denied. The 
number of state notices from state institutions was 104. Of this 
number 45 claims were denied. The number of state notices sent 
can be estimated by the number of state cases aided during the 
year in the table to be found appended. The number of official 
letters written during the year was 268. 

During the year 314 people have been sent out of the city by 
us at a cost of $389.26. The places to which they were sent were 
Tewksbury, Boston, Chicopee, Beverly, Fall River, Framingham, 
Rutland, Holyoke, and New Bedford in Mass. ; St. Gabrielle, 



Sherbrooke, Nicolet, Vercheres, and Montreal, P. Q. ; Plymouth 
and Manchester, N. H. ; Togus and Readfield, Me. ; Providence, 
R. I. ; Philadelphia, Pa. ; Queenstown, Ire. We have moved 
back to this city 34 Lowell paupers found elsewhere in the slate. 

The number of histories taken during the year was 414. 
This means the addition of over 1000 names at least to the pauper 
rolls. The total number of histories catalogued is 7,192. 

The number of orders for provisions given on the Almshouse 
department was 4,312 Of this number 4,300 were $2.00 orders 
and 12 for $3.00 orders, making the total cost $8,636.00. The 
number of fuel orders given was 4,538. Of this number 1,827 
were for wood and coal jointly and the balance for wood only. The 
amount of wood and coal used can be found in the appended table. 

The amount expended on orders on stores jumped to the 
highest figure it has ever reached, being 887 orders. The amount 
thus expended is $2,757.89, being $795.05 higher than in 1903 
and $917.48 more than the year previous. These orders on stores 
have always caused more unfavorable comment than any other 
form of aid. For years they have been a bone of contention and 
only those directly benefitted favor this form of aid. For years I 
have advocated the establishment of a city store from which every 
order given by us shall be delivered. The showing of the past 
year in dispensing $11,393.89 worth of provisions only goes to 
show the absolute necessity for such a store. Last year the matter 
was brought before the committee on appropriations and received 
their unanimous approval. We had prepared plans and estimates 
of cost for building the store, to be located on the board's lot at 
the corner of Broadway and Fletcher St. The cost would be 
inconsiderate compared with the savings that would accrue to the 
city. The favorable recommendation of the committee on appro- 
priation passed both branches of the City Council and went to the 
Mayor for his approval. At the expiration of eight days he sent 
it back to the City Council with the following communication : 

10 



Lowell, Mass., March 4th, 1904. 
To the City Council: 

" Gentlemen : — I have returned this day to the City Council a 
Joint Order presented to me for approval March 3, entitled an 
44 Order to Appropriate money to meet fixed charges and current 
expenses." I have approved the items of the order except the 
item " Building store and wood yard $2,000.00 " under the head 
of u Paupers " (Outdoor Relief). This item I disapprove. 

I do not believe it is wise nor will it prove to be economical 
for the city to establish a municipal store and woodyard for the 
benefit of the poor who receive relief at their homes. The exper- 
iment of maintaining a municipal woodyard has already been tried 
and abandoned as costly and unsatisfactory. In my opinion the 
sum of $2,000.00 is not sufficient to erect and fit up buildings for 
the proposed purposes. This expenditure would be only the 
beginning of a large expense. The change that is contemplated 
in the method of disbursing out door relief means that the city will 
have to pay a considerable sum yearly for work that it now gets 
for nothing or in part recompense for support and aid given at the 
Almshouse. I do not believe that either in the method of pur- 
chasing pauper supplies, their handling or delivery, the city will 
be a gainer by the adoption of the proposed change. 

There is a kind of pauperism, the result of sloth, shiftlessness 
and dissipation, which fastens itself unblushingly upon the muni- 
cipality and arrogantly demands support. Let us not contribute 
to the increase of such pauperism, the expense of which is already 
a heavy burden, by making it attractive, through a strained effort 
to have the facilities for its relief unduly easy. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES E. HOWE, Mayor. 

11 



This communication was first laid on the table for a week at 
the end of which time a committee of three aldermen were ap- 
pointed to look up the matter and report back. This committee 
has never reported, so the matter stayed on the table until. the 
expiration of the year. 

I never believed that the reasons given by the Mayor were all 
that prompted his action in this matter. I have an idea that the 
objections of a number of tradesmen, who would lose a few dollars 
every year by the change, had considerable to do with influencing 
his mind. 

However that may be the opinion of those, supposedly to be 
as anxious for the city's welfare as any other, and by experience 
best qualified to know the needs of the department, were unheeded 
and the matter was allowed to drop. I have no hesitation in 
saying that to my mind the city store idea is the very best the city 
can adopt. It has been tried elsewhere and has always given 
satisfaction. The very reasons the Mayor gives for refusing to 
approve the measure are the ones to my mind which commend its 
passage. The amount asked for would have been sufficient to 
meet the expense of fitting up the building according to the estim- 
ate of the foreman of the lands and buildings department. The 
expenditures would be final and the amount the city would be 
called upon to pay for the work now being done for nothing by 
almshouse inmates would be more than made up by the saving in 
the profits of the grocers, who supply the orders on stores, and the 
lessening of the aid given. That undesirable class of paupers 
referred to are shielded much more under the present system than 
by the one proposed. With the city store we not only are in closer 
touch with them but we know just what they get. All recipients 
get what they need and the amount of goods wasted yearly would 
be reduced to absolutely nothing. That is to say that in the $2.00 
orders from the almshouse, we put up a regular order of staple 

12 



necessities, all of which are not acceptable to every person. The 
result is that a large amount of goods are yearly wasted by not 
being used by the recipient. In the doing away with orders on 
stores the room for improvement is manifest. That the entire 
yearly output of the department would be very materially reduced 
by the city store system I am confidently sure, and I regret the 
failure of its adoption last year. 

I would counsel the board to recommend orders on stores for 
customers only in extreme cases. This form of aid is so simple 
and is so easy that the liability of its abuse is always present. No 
other form of aid adds so much to the yearly increase in business. 
Only in cases of sickness and extreme old age should orders on 
stores be given and to all others should go the regular order from 
the almshouse. In fact I would do away with orders on stores 
altogether, as I know that this method of giving aid attracts more 
paupers, who want more and stay longer and more continually on 
the rolls, than are attracted by delivering the goods ourselves. An 
overseer is not always doing a good turn for a family by getting 
them pauperized. In many instances it is the worst possible thing 
he could do for them. Especially is that so when the getting of 
the aid is made easy, agreeable and inviting. 

Cash Allowances 

The amount of cash expended last year amounted to $4,573.03. 
Of this amount $1,500.04 went for the care of childrens in families 
and the balance $3,072.99 for the support of aged and infirm 
people. Besides the 40 children who shared in its benefiits, 38 
adults were supported. Among pauper authorities the giving of 
cash is not approved. I think that it is advisable in some cases, 
but am not in accord with the generous policy towards which we 
are drifting. On that account I have always refused to take upon 
myself the responsibility of adding any name to the cash allowance 

IS 



list, preferring to refer all such to the entire board. I would 
suggest that your present list be revised as soon as possible and 
that great care be exercised in adding thereto. 

The Ambulance Department 

The cost of maintaining the ambulance service last year was 
$6,776.85 of which $4,547.16 was for salaries of drivers, $600, 
salary of ambulance physician and $1,029.69 for care of horses, 
wagons, harnesses and all incidentals. The calls for the year were 
as follows : — 

Whole number of calls 1,149 

Accident cases 322 

Sick cases 758 

Called and not used 67 

Second alarm of fire 2 

The cost of this branch of the department was very materially 
increased by the addition of two extra drivers last year, making 
the total number six. The amount expended is the largest ever 
reached in this city and I have my doubts as to whether any other 
city ever expended as much for similar service. 

City Dispensary and District Physicians 

The care and consideration Lowell shows her sick poor, 
outside of hospitals, cannot be excelled by any other municipality 
in the country. Our city dispensary is a credit to our department 
and merits the high place it takes in the public mind. Our district 
doctors are called upon to perform a great amount of work in a 
year, as an examination of the appended tables will show. During 
the year the expenses of the dispensary were $2,240.04 of which 

14 



$1,046.67 was for salary of the dispensary clerk and $1,193.37 for 
medicines and supplies. The total number of prescriptions com- 
pounded and given out during the year was 9,924. The tabulated 
card system introduced two years ago is still in use and 1,146 new 
cards were added during the year, The comparatively small 
amount expended for medicines and supplies is very gratifying 
when you take into consideration the large number of prescriptions 
given out. 

The only draw back to the city dispensary is the abuse of its 
privileges by those who can afford to go elsewhere. It is intended 
for, and should be used by the poor only, by those who cannot 
afford to get medical advice and medicine elsewhere. The pros- 
perous appearance of many who get treatment there leads me to 
believe that more rigorous rules should be made for applicants. 
A history of each should be taken and a more searching inquiry as 
to the means of all should be made. 

Another departure I believe would increase the efficiency of 
the dispensary service would be in a change in the method of the 
attendance of physicians. At present each district doctor is on 
service for one hour on the same day in every week throughout the 
year. Patients may come to him and be treated, and before the 
end of the week go to some other member of the staff. In this 
way the doctor cannot follow the case as intelligently as he would 
like to and the amount of medicine given away is materially 
increased. I would suggest that each physician put in his hour 
per day at the dispensary, every day, for two months, after which 
his attendance there ceases for the vear. In other words, instead 
of being in attendance one day a week throughout the year, each 
physician puts in two months in succession. In this way I believe 
the welfare of the patients will be enhanced and the cost of the 
dispensary will be decreased. A more intelligent comprehension 
of the patients will surely result. 

15 



District Physicians 

The amount expended on district physicians last year was 
$1,549.47, of which $1,200.00 was for the regular salary of the 
six — $200 per year, each — and $349.47 for treatment of patients 
having settlements in other cities or towns throughout the state. 
The last amount will be reimbursed. The total number of cases 
treated by the six physicians was 4,066, of which 676 patients 
were treated in their homes and 3,390 were treated at the dispens- 
ary^ This large number of cases serves to give you an idea of 
the importance of this work. It is certainly creditable to last 
year's dispensary staff to mention the fact that not a single com- 
plaint of inattention to duty was ever made against any of them. 
This is as it should be, as those to whom a doctor is called by this 
department are dependent on him for treatment. Their financial 
condition prevents them from getting medical advice elsewhere, 
and the member of the dispensary staff who neglects his calls is 
liable to be held accountable for a great wrong. It should be the 
effort of the board to get the best physicians obtainable and make 
as few changes as possible when the staff is working well. A 
physician who knows his patients can render better service than 
those who do not. In the event of changes I would like to request 
the members of the board to impress upon the minds of those 
elected, the importance of the place and the absolute necessity of 
strict attention to the duties thereof. 

Burials 

The total number of burials by this department during the 
year 1904 was 116, divided as follows : Adults 53, children 49, 
still born children 11, foundlings 3. The total cost including 
coffins and services of undertakers was $615.38. 



16 



City and Town Cases 

The total cost of supporting Lowell's poor in other places 
was $3,779.19. This amount included some old bills which had 
come over from preceding years, principally on account of disputes 
on questions of settlement. 

Children 

The total number of children who have been under the care 
of the department during the year was 199, of this number 88 were 
cared for at the city farm temporarily, 40 in orphan asylums, 50 
in private families and the balance was placed in permanent homes 
where the cost of their future maintenance will not be borne by 
the city. The total cost of maintaining those outside of the alms- 
house was $5,790.95. This amount includes $1,180.93 paid the 
commonwealth for the board of six children at the Massachusetts 
School for Feeble Minded. The amount paid to orphan asylums 
was $2,380.65, and the number of children thus cared for was 42, 
of which 39 remain fanuarv 1, 1905. •In private families, 40 
children were cared for at a cost of $1,775.04 and of this number 
29 remain. Eleven children were sent to relatives, four going to 
Maine, three to Canada and two to Connecticut. 

The amount annually spent for the care ot children could 
probably be greatly reduced by doing as some other cities in the 
state do, namely, turn over to the state all children who come 
under their care. This, to my mind, is not fair or equitable. I 
never could believe that the people of this city would favor any 
Ftich method in order to escape that cost which should rightfully 
be borne by them. Misfortune and crime bring the greater number 
of children to us, and to separate all from their kindred is not 
only # unjust but is inhuman. In the case of neglected children 
some body must bear the burden of their support and when there 

17 



are none of kin to do so, I believe the city to which the children 
belong should take up the burden. 

Sick Poor in Local Hospitals 

The amount paid for the support of the sick in local hospitals 
aggregated $2,477.07. Of this amount $2,160.71 was paid to 
St. John's Hospital and $316.36 to the Lowell Hospital Associa- 
tion. Of the amount paid to St. John's Hospital, $1,315.00 was 
for the support of Lowell cases and $845.71 for support of state, 
city and town cases. Of the amount paid Corporation Hospital, 
$147.43 was for support of Lowell cases and the balance, $168.93, 
went for support of state, city and town cases. As reimbuise- 
ments are received from state, city and town cases, the total net 
cost to the city for caring for 135 city patients during the year was 
$1,462.34. This amount is less than has been paid for many 
years. 

Wood Yard 

During the month of February we moved the wood yard from 
the farm to the old location at the ambulance yard. We pur- 
chased a saw table for $40.00 and have rented an electric motor 
for $5.00 per month. We paid the lands, and buildings depart- 
ment $186.10 for alterations in the barn to occommodate two more 
horses. The cost of wiring the motor was borne by us and 
amounted to $28 31. The entire cost of the wood yard, including 
$1,311.00 worth of wood and coal from the farm, pay of two men, 
$2,639.52 worth of wood and coal from local dealers, and all other 
expenses was $5,255.88. There has been no additional help 
added or required. The two drivers always required do all of 
the work, assisted by able bodied applicants for aid from this 
office. This branch of the department is economically run and 

18 



while conducted on the lines it is at present, will never be discon- 
tinued. The drivers are paid $12.00 per week, and the job is not 
a political sinecure. The advantage of having the fuel supply in 
the middle of the city can be readily seen, and the great pity is 
that we have not the depot for all the supplies there. The motor 
put in last year should be bought, as it is working well and gives 
great satisfaction. 

Removal of Insane 

On January 1, 1904, the law relative to the state care of the 
insane went into effect, and the State Board of Insanity started 
their work of removing all insane patients from local almshouses 
throughout the state. At that time we had 111 insane at the 
almshouse, of which 82 were women and 29 men. Lowell was 
the first city visited by the State Board, and the work of transfer- 
ring began. It was decided in cases of old people, who had been 
in our Almshouse for a number of years and whose condition was 
such as not to require any treatment other than is customarily given 
to Almshoure inmates, that such be allowed to remain with us. 
As a result of this decision 20 women and 8 men were left here. 
Of the others, 10 were discharged ; three died and the others 
were transferred as follows: to Worcester Insane Hospital, 33; 
to State Hospital at Tewksbii'v, 31; to Medfield Asylum, 3; to 
Danvers Insane Hospital, 3. 

I have never been favorably impressed with the new insane 
law, and am of opinion that it owes its place on the statute books 
more to the prevalence of sentimentality than to the exercise of 
common sense. I believe that chronic insane patients are much 
better off in their local almshouses than in state asylums. But 
little can be done for them in either place, except supplying them 
with the necessities for living. When at home, they are among 
scenes and people who are familiar, and are cared for by those 

19 



who knew them when they were well. A person committed for 
insanity now is under the supervision of those who are strangers 
to him and his individuality is lost. There is no connecting link 
between were he is and where he came from. His relatives and 
friends are put to considerable expense to visit him and, as time 
goes on, he becomes more and more apart from his former life 
until he is finally one insignificant case among thousands of similar 
cases. In my ten years experience with insane patients in state 
hospitals and asylums, I have never yet found an insane person 
from this city who did not hail with joy the proposition to remove 
him, or her, to our Almshouse. 

V 

The Workhouse 

For many years, the laws of this state have permitted cities 
and towns to maintain workhouses, and on February 26th, 1850, 
the City Council passed a resolution to the effect that the alms- 
house be deemed and declared to be established as the workhouse 
of the City of Lowell. After a few years opposition to this arose 
and on the 22nd of November, 1859, the workhouse was voted to 
be discontinued. The growing necessities of the times for such 
an institution were too great and on the 9th of July, 1872, it was 
re-opened. It has been in continuous existence ever since until 
last October. It's closing at the present time is due to the pa>sage 
of a law by last year's legislature, making it a criminal offence, 
punishable with a heavy fine, to keep in the same institution, 
workhouse and pauper inmates, without a complete separation of 
both. As the facilities in our institution don't admit of this separ- 
ation the only course left was to release all who were serving 
sentences there at the time the law became operative. As a con- 
sequence 44 were discharged on the last day of September. 

This law prohibiting any association between prisoner and 
pauper sounds well, but, as a matter of fact, as far as our institu- 

20 



tion ts concerned, ir is but a splitting of fine hairs. Fully ninety 
per cent of those who went there as prisoners have been there as 
paupers and the change of title is the only bar to their going 
there at present. Of the 44 prisoners released in September last, 
many of them went in to the almshouse immediately. Fully one- 
half of the 44 were re-arrested before the following Monday and 
were sent to the state farm or jail. Drunkenness was the besetting 
sin for which offenders were sent to the workhouse. This is be- 
coming to be regarded more of a weakness than a crime and on 
this account, there are many who consider the sending to jail of 
such offenders too great a penalty. 

Much as I would like to do so, I am not ready to say that the 
discontinuance of the workhouse was a wise movement. I am 
inclined to the opinion that the public needs of the near future will 
demand that it be once more established. This could readily be 
done by the use of some money. If the necessities for such an 
institution are not too pressing this department would be better off 
without. The time the law has been in force is too short to form 
an intelligent opinion of its workings and all that can be done is 
to wait and see if any hardships are imposed by its workings. 

In Conclusion 

Relative to the proposed legislation to abolish the present 
board of Overseer of the Poor and create a board of charities, to 
be appointed by the Mayor, I do not consider it my place to ex- 
press herein any opinion on the matter. I am a servant of the 
board, to do its bidding in all things appertaining to the work of 
this department and to flaunt my opinions in a public document in 
matters of this kind, strikes me as the personification of impro- 
priety. I would not mention the matter at all but for the teeling 
I have that the evils of the present system, which are said to— and 
do exist, are laid to the members of the Overseers when in 
reality they don't belong there. "Too much politics" is said — 

21 



and rightfully said too — to be the bane of the Overseers. There 
is not a man on this board, nor any who have been members in 
years past, who is not well aware of the truth of this assertion. 
We all know the injury to the department the introduction of 
politics makes and realize that the welfare, and very existence of 
too many people are too closely allied to it to have its workings 
buffeted around by the changing wants of successive successful 
politicians. But the presence of this evil does not rest with the 
overseers but with those to whom the members owe the fact that 
they are overseers, namely the voters. Each political party puts 
a premium on playing politics in this board by the rule they both 
make relative to the eligibility of a citizen to contest for the office. 
The democratic party levies an assessment of $25.00 on candidates 
while the republican party has just reduced their old figure of 
$40 00 to an assessment of $30.00 Why should any assessment 
be made to allow a man to become an overseer of the poor? The 
duties of the position performed according to the oath each man 
takes on assuming the office, are not such as are pleasing to any 
man. In point of fact the duties, faithfully performed, are very 
liable to be disagreeable ont s. Why should any candidate be 
compelled, not only to pay an assessment, but to go out and hustle 
among the voters to occupy a position, the duties of which should 
be labors of loyalty to the city, love to the unfortunate and sacrifice 
to his own personal feelings? A man should receive the praise of 
his fellow citizens for serving as an overseer of the poor instead 
of being compelled, as he is now, to assume the burden of proof 
in his contention that he is an honoiable man. 

In conclusion I have to thank the members of the board and 
officials and emplo)ees of the department for their uniform kind- 
ness towards me, and recommend to your careful perusal the 

subjoined tables. 

Respectfully submitted, 

M. J. COURTNY, Secretary. 
22 



NUMBER OF FAMILIES AIDED IN 1904. 





No. 

Families 


Males 


Females 


Total 


Lowell Cases 


573 


910 


1270 


2180 






City and Town Cases 


67 


96 


119 


215 


State Cases 


170 


315 


280 


595 






Total 


810 


1321 


1669 


2990 



NUMBER OF HISTORIES OF NEW CASES TAKEN 

DURING 1904. 

January '. 36 

Febauary 35 

March , 41 - 

April 29 

May.. 21 

June 29 

July 41 

August 24 

September 36 

October 31 

November . 35 

December 56 

Total 414 



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AMOUNTS PAID CITIES AND TOWNS 
On Account of Lowell's Paupers Residing Therein. 



CITIES. 






TOWNS. 






$110 


60 


Andover 


$' 57 45 


Boston 


264 


45 




207 50 


Cambridge 


3 


50 


Blackstone 


60 00 


Chelsea .... 


8 
74 


50 
40 


Billerica 


46 00 


Fall River 


Chelmsford ... . 


331 69 


Lawrence 


583 


70 


Clinton 


84 26 


Haverhill 


105 


65 




22 00 


Holyoke 


98 


05 


Sturbridge 


81 25 


Lynn 


152 


58 


Tewksbury 


245 11 


Newburyport 


240 


85 


Watertown 


80 75 


New Bedford 


64 


55 






North Adams. . . . 


43 


30 






Maiden 


16 


00 






Salem 


536 


54 






Somerville 


38 


05 




t 


Springfield 


27 


52 








113 


96 






Woburn 


40 


26 












$2,522 46 


$1,216 01 



Total Amount Expended, $3,738.47 



AMOUNTS RECEIVED FROM CITIES AND TOWNS 
For Aid Rendered in This City. 



CITIES. 






$ 75 75 




146 60 




19 50 


Fall River • 


27 75 




34 00 


Holyoke 


6 50 


Fitchburg 


34 25 




38 35 




126 00 


Marlborough 


83 00 


Newburyport 


84 00 




8 90 


Woburn 


40 50 



$725 10 



TOWNS. 

Amesbury $ 87 00 

Billerica 31 97 

Concord 39 50 

Dracut 13 25 

Chelmsford 108 75 

Boxborough 3 00 

Maynard "... . 129 00 

Oakdale 1 00 

Framingham 26 00 

Ipswich 36 75 

Palmer 87 75 

Amherst 32 00 

Hardwick 3 00 

Wilbraham 44 00 

Stoneham 104 58 

Stoughton 15 75 

Tewksbury 313 40 

Ware 91 75 

Webster 1 60 

Westford 7 50 

Winchester 68 50 

West Brookrield.. 13 50 

Watertown 28 50 



$1,288 05 



Total Amount Received, $2,013.15 



HOUSE CALLS BY DISTRICT DOCTORS FOR 1904, 



One 

January 10 

February 9 

March 14 

April 5 

May 11 

June 9 

July •• 11 

August . x 14 

September 7 

October ... 11 

November 4 

December 11 



DIRTRICTS. 










rwo 


Three 


Four 


Five 


Six 


Tota 


12 


9 


5 


10 


10 


56 


9 


10 


2 


27 


9 


66 


9 


13 


13 


12 


7 


68 


12 


6 


6 


18 


14 


61 


21 


7 


3 


14 


11 


67 


4 


7 


2 


15 


7 


44 


7 


16 


7 


11 


10 


62 


9 


8 


4 


11 


8 


54 


11 


9 


7 


5 ' 


4 


43 


8 


8 


6 


7 


4 


44 


12 


10 


7 


7 


12 


52 


11 


10 


8 


9 


10 


59 



Totals .... 116 125 113 70 146 106 676 



CASES TREATED AT DISPENSARY BY DISTRICT 
PHYSICIANS FOR 1904. 



One 

January ' 26 

February 49 

March 45 

April 60 

Mav 40 

June 39 

July 52 

August 46 

September. ... 39 

October 70 

November 25 

December 40 

Totals 531 



DISTRICTS. 










Two Three 


Four 


Five 


Six 


Total 


33 35 


28 


35 


60 


217 


30 39 


18 


37 


76 


249 


53 64 


19 


54 


77 


312 


31 60 


19 


44 


75 


289 


67 49 


13 


28 


71 


268 


42 55 


17 


25 


76 


254 


27 94 


21 


60 


89 


343 


53 78 


27 


48 


58< 


310 


71 57 


18 


37 


82 


304 


29 66 


18 


54 


93 


330 


51 69 


21 


21 


75 


262 


22 28 


35 


34 


93 


252 



509 694 254 477 925 3,390 



EXPENDITURES OF DEPARTMENT OF OUT-DOOR 
RELIEF FOR YEAR 1904. 



January . 
February 
March 
April . 
May 
f une . . 

August 
Septem 

October 

November 

December 



">ei 



Totals 



General 


[ 


Sundries 


i. 


$5,637 


19 


2,082 


14 


2,071 


98 


3,881 


62 


2,970 


t\6 


2,553 


53 


3,678 


32 


3,782 


78 


2,570 


44 


2,695 


81 


736 


41 


9,185 


44 


841,846 32 



Office 
Hills. 



$137 09 
48 32 
94 33 
82 45 
46 48 
30 35 
98 77 
70 64 
8 35 
133 35 
34 00 
41 73 



$825 86 



Salaries and 
Pay Rolls. 



$657 19 

711 80 

837 80 
1,009 75 

837 

837 
1,009 

837 80 

837 80 
1,009 75 

837 80 
1,009 79 



Total. 



80 

80 
75 



$10,434 83 



$6,431 47 

2,842 26 
3,004 
4,973 
3.854 
3,421 
4,786 
4,691 
3,416 
3,838 
1.608 
10,236 



11 

82 
94 
68 
84 
22 
59 
91 
21 
96 



$53,107 01 



AMOUNT PAID FOR LOWELL'S SICK POOR IN LOCAL 
HOSPITALS FOR YEAR 1904. 





St. John's Hospital. 


Lowell Hospital Associ'n 




- 


City Cases. 

$ 87 25 
127 25 

77 25 
101 00 

96 75 
147 00 

124 25 
121 75 
130 00 

95 75 
81 00 

125 75 


State, City 

and I'ow n 

Cases. 


City Cases 


State, City 

and Town 

Cases. 


Total. 


January . . . . 
February . . 

March 

April 

May 

Julv 

August 

September. . 
October .... 
November . . 
December . . 


$100 55 

124 41 

116 57 

42 57 

35 71 

32 14 

54 89 

27 86 

20 72 

46 00 

104 43 

139 86 

$845 71 


% 

1U 00 

38 50 
28 50 
24 50 

45 93 
$147 43 


% ■... 

21 86 
44 00 

103 07 


$187 80 
261 66 
193 82 
143 57 
170 96 
229 50 
247 64 

149 61 

150 72 
141 75 
185 43 
414 61 


Totals. . . 


$1,315 00 


$168 93 


$2,477 07 



MONTHLY RECEIPTS OF DFPARTMENT 
DOOR RELIEF FOR 1904. 



OF OUT- 



January . . 
February . 
March . . . 

April . 

Mav 

June 

J"iy 

August. . . 

September 

October 

November 

December 

Totals. 



Credited to 
Appropriation. 



6 75 

12 25 

12 50 

11 50 

8 25 

2 50 



75 
25 



6 92 
68 53 



$136 20 



Credited to 

.eneral Treasury 

Fund. 



: 737 10 

178 73 

1,321 28 

328 80 

322 57 

93 25 

422 10 

858 60 

115 25 

39 50 

47 60 

428 96 



$4,893 74 



Total. 



; 737 10 

185 48 

1,333 53 

34] 30 

334 07 

101 50 

424 60 

858 60 

118 00 

43 75 

54 52 

497 49 



$5,029 94 



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FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE PAUPER 
DEPARTMENT FOR THE YEAR 1904. 



OUT-DOOR RELIEF. 



CREDITS. 



Appropriation . $43,585 00 

Additional Appropriation 9,385 81 

Receipts to Credit of Appropriation. . 136 20 

Total Credits $53,107 01 



DEBITS. 

Gross Expenditures $53,107 01 

Receipts credited to General Treasury 

Fund 4,893 74 

Net Cost of Out-Door Relief Dept $48,213 27 



CITY HOSPITAL AND ALMSHOUSE. 

CREDITS. 

Appropriation $50,817 89 

Additional Aypropriation 10,746 78 

Receipts to Credit of Appropriation . 10,056 36 

Total Credits ■ • • • $71,621 03 

36 



DEBITS. 

Gross Expenditures. . $71,621 03 $71,621 03 

Amount Paid for Out-Door Relief.. . . 9,947 00 

Receipts Credited to General Treasury 

Fund 976 20 

$10,923 20 

Net Cost of Hospital and Almshouse $ 60,697 83 

Net Cost of Entire Pauper Department 108,911 10 

Respectfully submitted, 

MARTIN J. COURTNEY, 

Secretary. 



37 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Lowell City Hospital and Almshouse 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING DEC. 31 
19 4 



Superintendent's Report* 



Lowell, Mass., Dec. 31, 1904, 
To the Overseers of the Poor: 

Gentlemen : — I have the honor to present to you the follow- 
ing report : 

The beginning of the year found us with the old order which 
included a workhouse and an infirmary for the insane and 
demented. 

Since that time the reprehensible practice of committing 
prisoners to an institution designed solely for the sick and needy 
has ceased and a large number of the committed insane hare been 
removed. We still retain, however, many insane patients who 
have been committed but who are considered what are termed 
u almshouse cases" and a still larger number in various stages of 
dementia who have not been committed for various reasons, prin- 
cipally due to extreme age. Hence the total number of patients 
in the infirmaries, male and female combined, is now ninety-one 
as compared with a population one hundred and eleven, twelve 
months ago. 

41 



Furtermore, the total population in all departments combined 
is today four hundred and one as compared with four hundred 
and twelve a year since, an actual decrease of only eleven with 
every promise of a marked increase, due mainly to the unlicensed 
abuse of this- institution by that class who, due to their " pull," 
use it as a refuge when threatened with death or arrest following 
the excessive use of alcohol. 

During the year the total number of admissions to the alms- 
house alone amounted to seven hundred and sixty-five and of this 
number one hundred eighty-two were pure alcoholics and at 
admission presented all the phases from acute delirium to the 
coma preceding death. 

I will admit that some of these admissions were justifiable and 
worthy of the treatment accorded them, but in a large number of 
the cases this was not true. 

The glaring abuse, however, lies in the fact that the worst of 
the class of recurrent alcoholics, after treatment which is neces- 
sarily expensive, demand their release as soon as recovered rather 
than do any work in payment and failing to get it readily, take 
41 French leave." One man stated that he was told to do this by 
a member of your board. The result is not far to seek and I 
presume the animus is obvious. 

It must be patent to you as it is to me that the true idea of a 
system of charities as an arrangement which should secure con- 
fortable asylums and appropriate provisions for the poor in sickness 
and old age only, is far from being realized here at present, for 
without the co-operation of your board, it is virtually impossible 
to dissociate the worthy from the unworthy owing partially to the 
woful lack of discrimination with respect to admissions. 

We have here the spectacle of unworthy individuals whose 
distress is caused immediately by their own vice and wilful folly, 

42 



who should belong solely to the province of the law, demandin 
the indulgences that belong only to the respectable and sick poor 
and resenting anything savoring of discipline. 

During the year the enormous number of two thousand nine 
hundred and four tramps have been housed and have been required 
to perform three hours labor. In the main this has been complied 
with cheerfully and willingly. The records of their previous 
stopping places would indicate that the majority came from 
Boston. 

There has been little improvement in the quarters allotted to 
them and as yet no money has been appropriated wherewith to 
furnish much needed sanitary facilities. It is true they belong 
to the department of police, but if we are to continue to be com- 
pelled to harbor them, we ought to be spared, and try to spare 
other places, danger of infection from what might be termed 
itinerant disease mongers. 

The nursery needs enlarging and the need is imperative. 
The constantly crowded condition makes isolation difficult, if not 
impossible, and leaves us constantly menaced by epidemics. The 
highest number in the nursery on any one day was twenty-five and 
the lowest eight. 

In the lying-in ward there were sixteen births, of which sixty- 
two per cent were illegitimate. 

It would be well if these births could be officially registered 
from some other address than the almhouse, in order to remove the 
disability from which children born in almshouses may suffer in 
after life. 

Of the legitimate diseases treated, Tuberculosis again furnished 
the largest number, the combined hospitals, male and female 
having registered twenty-eight cases. 

4a 



The total number of deaths from all causes was one hundred, 
of which one only was due to alcoholism. 

The daily average in the two hospitals was eighty-two. 

More than twenty-two hundred prescriptions were made up 
in the dispensary and since the month of April it has been required 
that the pharmacist be registered in accordance with the suggestion 
of the State Board of Charity. 

The output from the carpenter, tin and blacksmith shops has 
been about as usual. The farm shows a fair increase. 

Some of the most urgent improvements were made by the 
Public Buildings department, out of a small fund allowed to it for 
that purpose, so that only minor repairs had to be paid out of the 
appropriation allowed to us for maintenance. 

I am again giving a list of necessary repairs and improve- 
ments to the above department and we can only hope that our 
wishes will sometime be honored, and lest it be forgotten I would 
again call to ^our attention the suggestion that the vacant lot at 
the north end of the sand bank, with large frontage on Chelmsford 
street, could be disposed of and the proceeds used to advantage in 
bettering the physical condition of our buildings. 

In conclusion I beg your assistance in the line of progress. 

Respectfully, 

CHARLES E. DONLAN. 



44 



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DAILY POPULATION OF ALMSHOUSE FOR YEAR 

19 4. 



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i 377 327 345 330 297 285 309 330 322 327 362 370 

2 377 329 345 33° 297 285 310 334 326 327 364 370 

3 375 328 33 8 328 297 285 303 333 329 330 366 376 

4 375 328 338 328 294 286 300 323 329 330 368 377 

5 379 325 336 327 293 288 301 323 331 330 368 377 

6 379 326 337 327 290 292 301 325 329 332 368 371 

7 377 325 339 327 288 289 301 325 331 331 368 371 

8 377 328 342 322 285 288 301 329 333 332 366 380 

9 374 327 338 319 288 292 303 332 335 335 360 381 

10 375 328 338 321 289 291 304 332 336 343 363 387 

11 374 330 328 319 292 291 303 331 336 343 363 382 

12 347 335 339 319 289 291 305 329 336 348 363 380 

13 346 333 34i 3> 8 28 9 293 306 329 332 344 363 380 

14 345 333 34i 3' s 288 293 309 327 329 346 365 380 

15 345 335 338 3 2 ° "285 2 95 3° 8 329 33 1 344 3 6 3 379 

16 345 3 2 9 337 3C9 28s 300 307 327 ^^ 346 366 380 

17 ••••••• •• 344 3 2 9 337 3°9 28 5 2 9 8 308 330 335 347 363 380 

18 343 333 337 3 f2 287 300 308 332 335 350 364 378 

19 343 335 340 308 285 304 306 333 334 351 364 378 

20 344 338 339 3ii 2 85 3°4 3°9 333 33° 35i 363 378 

21 35° 33 6 339 3°4 284 304 310 333 330 347 363 386 

22......... . 353 336.337 304 286 304 308 333 33O .350 367 386 

2 3 355 336 334 3°3 28 5 308 315 329 329 350 368 385 

24 354 337 33 2 3°4 284 3°9 3'4 3 2 8 325 348 369 380 

2 5 354 342 333 2 97 285 314 312 329 325 350 370 383 

26 353 344 333 297 2S5 314 312 328 322 357 3 6 9 383 

27 35 2 343 335 2 9 6 28 5 3'4 3'° 3 2 8 3 2 4 3 6t 367 3 8 3 

28 352 343 333 297 286 312 310 328 324 361 367 380 

29 327 343 333 3° 2 285 308 316 326 327 360 369 385 

30 3 28 ••• 333 3°° 286 309 316 327 327 360 369 389 

31 328 ••• 330 ... 284 ... 323 327 ... 362 ... 399 

Avg • 356 333 337 313 288 298 308 329 329 345 366 380 



DAILY POPULATION OF WORKHOUSE FOR YEAR 

1904. 



Date 



c 

eg 

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S 


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a 
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Ml 


Sept. 


43 




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1 35 28 

2 35 229 

3 35 2 9 

4 34 %9 

5 32 28 

6 3 2 2 9 

7 *••• 3 2 2 9 

8 30 29 

9 32 3 2 

10. . . 32 32 

11 31 33 

12 28 33 

13 28.-33 

14 28 33 

15 28 32 

16 v 27 32 

17 2 7 32 

18 27 34 

19 29 34 

20 29 34 

31 •■" 28 34 

22 29 34 

23 29 32 

24 29 33 

25 2 9 3 2 

26 28 32 

27 •• 28 34 

28 28 34 

29 28 34 

30 28 

31 28 .. 

Avg 30 32 



33 


39 


38 


64 


56 


88 


64 


36 


39 


34 


65 


56 


88 


65 


36 


36 


36 


65 


57 


84 


63 


36 


36 


37 


65 


55 


79 


63 


36 


36 


4i 


58 


55 


78 


63 


36 


36 


4i 


58 


55 


79 


56 


36 


36 


43 


59 


55 


81 


55 


36 


33 


43 


60 


55 


76 


56 


35 


33 


43 


60 


54 


73 


56 


34 


35 


43 


60 


5* 


75 


56 


3i 


35 


43 


59 


58 


76 


56 


3i 


34 


43 


59 


59 


77 


56 


3i 


34 


48 


59 


65 


77 


56 


3i 


33 


48 


59 


65 


77 


56 


33 


33 


43 


59 


59 


73 


56 


34 


35 


43 


50 


59 


86 


56 


35 


35 


42 


49 


60 


89 


53 


37 


35 


43 


47 


60 


88 


53 


39 


34 


46 


47 


66 


88 


53 


40 


33 


46 


47 


71 


88 


53 


40 


35 


44 


48 


77 


89 


52 


37 


35 


44 


48 


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5 2 


38 


33 


44 


50 


86 


81 


52 


39 


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84 


80 


52 


39 


35 


49 


5o 


84 


79 


52 


39 


36 


49 


54 


94 


7« 


49 


39 


36 


49 


54 


94 


69 


49 


39 


37 


61 


56 


93 


69 


49 


39 


38 


62 


56 


92 


69 


47 


39 


36 


62 


57 


93 


65 


47 


39 




61 




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36 35 45 56 69 79 55 



DAILY POPULATION OF HOSPITAL, ALMSHOUSE 
AND WORKHOUSE FOR 1904. 



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2 412 35 8 3 8x 369 33i 35o 366 422 391 327 364 370 

3 4io 357 374 364 333 35° 360 417 39 2 33° 366 376 

4 409 357 374 364 33i 35i 355 402 392 330 368 377 

5 4ii 353 372 363 334 346 356 401 394 330 368 377 

6 4" 355 373 3^3 33* 35° 356 404 385 332 368 371 

7 /09 354 375 363 331 350 356 406 386 331 368 371 

8 407 357 378 355 328 348 356 405 389 332 366 380 

9 406 359 373 352 33i 348 357 405 39 1 335 3 6 ° 3 8 i 

10 407 360 372 356 332 352 362 407 392 343 363 387 

11 405 3 6 3 369 354 335 35* 361 407 39 2 343 3 6 3 3 g 2 

12 375 368 370 353 332 35o 364 406 392 348 363 380 

13 374 3 66 372 352 337 35° 37' 406 388 344 363 380 

14 373 3 66 372 351 336 35 2 374 404 3 8 5 34^ 365 3 8 ° 

15 373 3 6 7 37i 353 328 352 367 402 387 344 363 379 

16 372 3 6r 37i 344 328 354 366 413 389 346 3 6 6 3 8 ° 

17 37i 3 61 372 344 327 35° 368 419 388 347 363 380 

18 37o 3 6 7 374 347 33° 347 36S 420 388 350 364 378 

19 372 3 6 9 379 342 33' 347 372 421 387 351 364 378 

20 373 372 379 344 33' 35' 3 8 ° 421 3 8 3 35' 363 378 

21... • 37 8 37o 379 339 3 28 35' 3 8 7 422 382 347 363 386 

22.... 382 370 374 339 330 352 389 420 382 350 367 386 

23 3 8 4 3 68 372 336 329 35 2 401 4'6 3 8 ' 35° 3 68 3 8 5 

24 383 3/o 37' 338 332 35 8 39 8 408 377 348 369 380 

25 383 374 372 332 334 359 396 408 377 35° 37© 383 

26 381 376 372 333 334 364 406 406 371 357 3 6 9 383 

27 380 377 374 33 2 334 368 404 397 373 3 6 ' 367 3 8 3 

28 380 377 372 334 347 368 403 397 373 36i 367 380 

29 355 377 372 340 347 3 68 40 8 395 374 3 6 ° 3 6 9 3 8 5 

30 355 • • • 372 336 34 8 364 409 39 2 374 360 369 389 

31 35 6 •• 3 6 9 ••• 345 3 6 6 416 392 ••• 362 ... 399 

Avg 3 86 365 373 34 8 333 354 377 408 384 345 366 380 



January . 
February 
March . 
April . . . 

May 

June. . . . 

July .... 

August. . 

September 

October 

November 

December 





BIRTHS, 


1904. 






Male 


Female 


Legitimate 


Illegitimate 


Totai 


1 





1 





1 

















1 








1 


1 


3 





1 


2 


3 

















2 








2 


2 





1 





1 


1 





1 


1 





1 

















1. 


1 





2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


4 





1 


1 





1 



Totals 



10 



10 



16 



DEATHS, 1904. 



January. . 
February. . 
March. . . 

April 

May 

June „ . . . . 

July 

August . . . 
September 
October. . . 
November. 
December. 

Totals 



Male 

2 


Female 

5 


Total 

7 


4 


1 


5 


4 


3 


7 


4 


5 


9 


5 


6 


11 


6 


2 


8 


5 


4 


9 


4 


6 


10 


7 


1 


8 


3 


1 


4 


4 


7 


11 


5 


6 


11 



53 



47 



100 



FARM PRODUCTS FOR YEAR 1904. 

Apples, No. 1 40 Barrels 

Apples, No. 2 25 Barrels 

Apples, Cider 85 Barrels 

Beans, String 32 Bushels 

Beef 1290 lbs. 

Beets 82 Bushels 

Cabbage 43,200 lbs. 

Celery 380 Bunches 

Cider, Made 834 Gal. 

Corn, Sweet 144 Bushels 

Cucumbers 140 Bushels 

Carrots 95 Bushels 

Eggs 773 Dozen 

Grapes '. 15 Bushels 

Green Fodder Oats 3880 lbs. 

Green Fodder Barley 4200 lbs. 

Hay. 86 Tons 

Lettuce 80 Dozen 

Milk 14,409 Gal. 

Onions 182 Bushels 

Parsnips 81 Bushels 

Peaches 2 Bushels 

Pears 42 Bushels 

Peas, Green 40 Bushels 

Plumbs - 8 Bushels 

Pork, Dressed 4163 lbs. 

Potatoes 720 Bushels 

Poultry, Dressed 336 lbs. 

Radishes 340 Bunches 

Squash 32,400 lbs. 

Tomatoes 138 Bushels 

Turnips, Rutabagas 242 Bushels 

50 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 



Month 



January . . . 
February . . 
March .... 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August. . . 
September. 
October . . 
November. 
December . 

Totals. 



Sal. and Labor Sundries 



1,314 
1,232 
1,073 
1,432 
1.105 
1,173 
1,449 
1,198 
1,189 
1,438 
1,198 
1,514 



74 
14 
13 
78 
57 
39 
23 
14 
13 
08 
14 
01 



$2,177 85 
2,447 36 
3,784 93 
3,311 45 

874 16 
1,658 24 

979 56 
1,085 49 
1,220 22 
3,945 43 

809 80 
1,380 68 



$15,318 48 $23,675 17 $32,627 38 



G. G. & P. 



$3,981 90 
3,669 80 
3,756 
1,683 
2,528 
1,933 
1,349 
2,284 
3,172 
£554 
1,212 
5,499 



39 
03 

84 
28 
61 
78 
88 
71 
48 
68 



Totals 



;7,474 49 
7,349 30 
8,614 45 
6,427 26 
4,508 57 
4,764 
3,778 
4,568 
5,582 
6,938 
3,220 



91 
40 
41 
23 

22 
42 



8,394 37 



$71,621 03 



Total expenditure $71,621 03 

Per Capita Cost per week 3 01 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



BIRTHS. MARRIAGES. AND DEATHS 



IN THE 



City of Lowel], 



FOR THE YEAR 1904. 




LOWELL, MASS., 

PRESS OF C. E. ROBINSON 
1905 



CITY OF LOWELL. 



In Board of Aldermen, 
April 4, 1905. 

Received, read, ordered on file; sent down for 
concurrence. 

GIRARD P. DADMAN, City Clerk. 

In Common Council, 
April 4, 1905. 

Received, read and ordered on file in concur- 
rence. 

FRANK M. DOWLING, Clerk. 



CITY OF LOWELL. 



City Clerk's Office, I 
April 4, 1905. ( 

To the Honorable City Council: 

Gentlemen : — I have the honor to present yon 
herein the annual report of Births, Marriages and 
Deaths for the year 1904, as of record in this office, 
to wit: 

BIRTHS. 

Ward 
WARDS— One Two Three Four Five Six Seven Eight Nine not Total 

given 

Whole Number 171 257 232 .304 247 337 568 191 192 16 2515 

Males 70 136 114 146 123 181 310 103 105 9 1303 

Females 95 121 118 158 124 156 258 88 87 7 1212 

American Parents.... 27 29 65 63 40 60 68 69 53 2 476 

Foreign Parents 106 190 102 193 166 195 395 60 90 4 1501 

American Father, 

Foreign Mother-... 17 21 27 22 22 36 43 34 24 246 

Foreign Father, 

American Mother-. 19 14 37 25 15 45 60 26 25 1 267 
Parents' Nationality 

Unknown 2 3 114 12 2 9 25 

Twins 2 1 6 4 2 4 4 4 1 1 ' 29 

Increase over 1903, 1. 

Still Births not included in above, 143, 



4 ANNUAL REPORT 

MARRIAGES. 

The number of intentions of marriage issued in 
1904 was 1056, 45 more than in 1903. 

The number of marriages recorded was 1065, 
being 39 more than in 1903. 

The number of marriages solemnized in Lowell 
was 990 ; solemnized elsewhere, 75. 

NUMBER OF MARRIAGES IN EACH MONTH IN 1904. 

January 71 May 91 September 89 

February 70 June 175 October .119 

March 21 July 82 November 109 

April 105 August • 75 December 58 

NATIONALITY OF CONTRACTING PARTIES. 

GROOMS. BRIDES. 

United States 450 453 

Canada }96 192 

Ireland 110 132 

England .... * 67 45 

British Provinces 44 57 

Scotland 13 9 

Russia and Poland 26 20 

Greece 39 38 

Portugal and Western Islands 31 33 t 

Austria 60 64 

Norway and Sweden 9 8 

Other Countries 20 14 

GROOM. BRIDE. 

Oldest Couple Married 68 58 

Youngest Couple Married 18 16 

Oldest person, 74. Youngest person, 15. 

Grooms under 21 years, 56. Brides under 18 years, 20. 



ANNUAL REPORT. 5 

DEATHS. 

The total number of deaths returned and recorded 
in the City Clerk's Office for the year 1904 was 1779 ; 
of these 43 were residents of Lowell who died else- 
where, making the number of deaths returned and 
recorded as having occurred in Lowell, exclusive of 
still births, 173(5, a decrease from 1903 of 161, 

Males 8G0 

Females 876 

Persons between 80 and 90 years GO 

Persons over 90 years M 13 

Still births (not included in above) 143 

Statistics in greater detail relating to deaths may 
be found in the annual report of the Board of Health. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GIRARD P. DADMAN, 

City Clerk. 



TWENTY -SEVENTH 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



OF THE 



CITY OF LOWELL 



FOR THE YEAR 1904 




LOWELL, MASS.: 

The Lawlhk Printing Company. 

1905. 



ORGANIZATION, 1904. 



BOARD OF HEALTH, 



WILLIAM B. JACKSON, M. D., Chairman. 
LEONARD HUNTRESS, M. D. 
WILLIAM C. DOHERTY. 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT OFFICERS, 



H. H. KNAPP, Agent and Secretary of Board. 
THOMAS B. SMITH, M. D., Bacteriologist. 
WILLIAM A. JOHNSON, M. D., Physician. 
STEPHEN GARRITY, Plumbing Inspector. 
WILLIAM H. CONNORS, Plumbing Inspector. 
FRED A. BATES, Inspector Contagious Diseases. 
FRANCIS J. O'HARE, General Inspector. 
JOHN M. FARRELL, Inspector Meat and Provisions. 
KATHARINE W. SNOW, Registrar. 



CITY OF LOWELL. 



In Board of Aldermen, January 24, 1905. 
Received, read and ordered on file in concurrence. 

GIRARD P. DADMAN, City Clerk. 



In Common Council, February 21, 1905. 
Received, read and ordered on file; sent down for concurrence. 

FRANK M. DOWLING, Clerk. 



REPORT 



Lowell, Mass., January, 1905. 

To the Honorable Mayor and City Council of the 
City of Lowell: 

The Board of Health respectfully submits its twenty-sev- 
enth annual report of its acts and decisions for the year 1904. 
together with a statement of the receipts and expenditures of 
the department for the same period. 

The Board of Aldermen having failed to confirm two ap- 
pointees before the first Monday in February, for the places 
held by Mr. J. H. McGuinnesS and Dr. Guy Holbrook, whose 
three-year terms had expired respectively in February, 1903, 
and February, 1904, these two members continued as hold- 
overs, and on Feb. 23, the Board organized for the ensuing 
year, Dr. Holbrook being elected Chairman, and Dr. Jackson, 
Secretary. This organization continued until April, when the 
Board of Aldermen having approved the Mayor's appointment 
of Mr. William C. Doherty for the expired term filled for a 
year by Mr. McGuinness, the former took his seat as a mem- 
ber of the board, and a new organization was effected, Dr. 
Holbrook resigning as Chairman and Dr. Jackson as Secre- 
tary, and Dr. W. B. Jackson was elected Chairman, and Agent 
Knapp, Secretary. At the second meeting in April, Dr. Leon- 
ard Huntress took the seat of Dr. Holbrook, and since that 
time the Board has consisted of Dr. W. B. Jackson, Mr. Wil- 
liam C. Doherty, and Dr. Leonard Huntress. As thus consti- 



b ANNUAL REPORT 

tuted, there has been perfect unanimity of action on every 
matter coming before us for consideration. 

The last act of the Board in 1903 was to adopt for the en- 
suing year the Bertillon or International System of Nomen- 
clature of Diseases and Causes of Death. This, for a few 
months, greatly increased the labor of our Chief Medical In- 
spector, it becoming his duty to interview certain physicians 
and get them to change such indefinite terms as "debility," 
"heart failure," "inanition," "infantile," "marasmus," and 
"shock" as causes of death. We are glad to be able to state 
that the work has not been in vain, most of the mortuary cer- 
tificates now being filled out in a perfectly satisfactory manner. 

The regulation of the water supply in barber shops was 
another legacy which came down to us from last year, that 
Board having adopted certain rules for the sanitary improve- 
ment of barber shops, all of which rules were reasonable, and 
also easily carried out, except one, whereby it was required 
that "every barber shop shall be provided with running hoi 
and cold water." This one necessitating the expenditure of 
from twenty to fifty dollars for plumbing, many of the barbers 
sought in different ways to evade. In order that the meaning 
of the regulation should admit of no question, the Board, in 
May, passed an amendment to the regulation to the effect that 
"said hot water shall be furnished through a pressure boiler." 
At the moment of writing, practically all the shops have com- 
plied with the requirements. 

The City Solicitor, early in the year, gave an opinion that 
the Board could not,without the Mayor's signature, give a con- 
tract to Mr. Francis Gallagher to dispose of the paper waste 
for a period of ten years at one hundred twenty-five dollars 
($125.00) a year, because the total amount involved was in ex- 
cess of three hundred dollars ($300.00). An effort was made 
by one member of the Board to open the matter by again 
advertising for bids to dispose of the paper waste, but this was 
voted down, and it was ordered that the contract be given to 
Mr. Gallagher for one year, he to pay the city one hundred 
twenty-five dollars ($125.00). The man who for several years 



BOARD OF HEALTH 7 

had bad the contract, obtained a junk dealer's license, made 
some private contract with the principal firms having waste 
paper to dispose of and collected the paper himself, greatly 
curtailing the supply which Mr. Gallagher expected to receive. 
Mr. Gallagher had been warned when he took the contract 
that such an event might occur, but he wanted to take the 
obligation, notwithstanding the risk. He soon appeared, how- 
ever, before the Board, complaining that he was getting but a 
small part of the paper for which he had bargained. The 
Board, however, had no power to stop business firms from 
making a private disposition of their paper, nor to take away 
the junk dealer's license. 

Mr. Gallagher again appeared and asked for a rebate in 
the amount which he had agreed to pay the city, but this the 
Board declined to do. Mr. Gallagher has not paid the City 
for the last two quarters, this amounting to $62.50. His con- 
tract expires Jan. 12, 1905. If we cannot collect the amount 
due without recourse to law, the City will at least have re- 
ceived $12.50 more than in the preceding year. 

The nuisance which for years had given the Board the 
most trouble, and that which it was the most difficult to 
abate, was the so-called "Gas Nuisance." Hundreds of com- 
plaints had been sent to the office and to individual members 
of the Board. Numerous hearings were held at which com- 
plainants, representatives of the Gas Light Company, and the 
City Engineer were present. The Gas Light Company pro- 
cessed a willingness to do anything in its power to stop the 
trouble. At a hearing held in January, a representative of 
the Gas Company claimed that the trouble was not due to 
the filtrate discharged into the sewer at the Gas Works, but 
that the bad odor arose from steam discharged into the 
sewer, contrary to law, by manufacturing and other concerns 
on Western Avenue. On cross-examination, however, this 
representative was unable to explain why there should be an 
odor of gas in the sewer at the corner of Broadway and 



8 ANNUAL REPORT 

School Streets, or how steam could produce an odor of gas 
if there was no gas residue present in the sewer. 

The Board investigated the claim in regard to the dis- 
charge of steam into the sewer, inspecting along the line of 
the main sewer or its tributaries every manufacturing or 
other concern using steam. We found that a large amount of 
hot water was emptied into the sewer by the laundries along 
Western Avenue, but that no steam under pressure was 
turned into the sewer, contrary to law. The Board made 
many personal inspections of houses where the bad odor was 
manifest; we followed up the line of the sewer, observing 
the odor at the man-holes and traced this same odor to the 
Gas Light Company's plant, and were satisfied that the cause 
of the nuisance was a tarry filtrate discharged into the sewer 
at the Gas W^orks. 

This tarry matter is a waste product of no commercial 
value, being the residue remaining in the water after the car- 
buretting of water gas. The amount of this tarry water is 
from one to two thousand gallons daily and the disposal of 
this odorous material has been for years 'a serious and perplex- 
ing problem for the Gas Company and the Board of Health. 
Till within about two years ago, they carted 
most of it to the river, and discharged some 
of it into the sewer, but the people along 
the course of the sewer made so many complaints of the odor 
that the Gas Company found they must make some other dis- 
position of the offending material. To this end, they built a 
filtration plant and endeavored to free the water from the 
tarry matter by precipitating the latter with lime-water, subse- 
quently passing the water through successive beds of coke, the 
latter being changed occasionally as it became charked with 
tar, and finally the water was discharged into the sewer. 
This water was nearly clear, and when cold, it had only a 
slight odor of tar. 

Such, in brief, were the conditions of the Gas Works up to 
the spring of 1904. It was found, however, that there was no 
abatement of the "Gas Nuisance"; in fact, it was even worse 



BOARD OF HEALTH 9 

than ever during the winter of 1903-4. Complaints were so 
numerous and persistent that we felt that the nuisance 
must be stopped though it involved the city in an expensive 
suit at law with a rich corporation. We engaged the services 
of L. A. Olney, Professor of Chemistry at the Lowell Textile 
School, to make further investigations and to give expert tes- 
timony in court, if necessary. With him, for about two 
months, we studied the problem, even going to the extent of 
donning oil suits and rubber boots and personally inspecting 
the bottom of the sewer at nearly every man-hole along its 
course. We found that the tar-water nitrate from the Gas 
Works, as it was discharged into the sewer in Western 
Avenue, was slightly warm and gave off a decided tarry odor. 
We also found that the bottom of the sewer at the man-holes 
in this avenue was covered several inches deep with a mix- 
ture of sand and tar, smelling very strongly of the latter, and 
of course, giving off its volatile principles to the water pass- 
ing over it. Opposite the Plush Works and at the laundries 
on Western Avenue, considerable hot water came into the 
sewer, having the effect of increasing the tarry odor. The 
Rock Street sewer empties into the main line near Richard- 
son's Grocery Store in Liberty Square, and the level of the 
larger sewer being several feet lower than that of the smaller, 
the water from the latter makes quite a cascade, very effectu- 
ally stiring up the contents of the main line, and giving rise to 
a cloud of odorous steam, some of which escapes through the 
man-hole, assaulting the olfactories of all to the leeward of 
the spot. It may be said in passing that at this locality the 
odor of gas had always been more pronounced than at any 
other point on the line. Down Suffolk Street, where the 
Cross Street sewer enters, the conditions are very nearly the 
same, the cascade not being quite as high. But here it would 
seem that the tarry vapor, perhaps on account of the direc- 
tion of the wind, at times travels up the Cross Street sewer 
and escapes, probably through weak points in the plumbing, 
into the cellar of the Parochial School and into the cellar of 
Mrs. Lyons, at No. 25 Cross Street, two places where the nuis- 



10 ANNUAL REPORT 

ance has been complained of very often. As this main sewer 
crosses under the Northern Canal at Ford Street, it makes a 
drop of eight feet from the middle of the street to a point be- 
low the edge of the canal, and also diminishes very markedly 
in size under the canal, the sewer before it makes the drop in 
level being oval in section, 38 inches by 52 inches, while under 
the canal its section is circular and 36 inches in diameter. 
Where the water is high, as it would be during or after a 
storm this drop in level and great decrease in size must act as 
a trap for the air or vapor back of this point, causing the 
vapor to escape through the man-holes or be driven by the 
wind up the tributary sewers, and, as at Cross Street, work- 
ing out through some of the cellars — a notable example being 
the premises of Miss Marietta Wheeler, 722 Merrimack Street, 
not to mention a dozen others. 

As a result of our investigations, we felt able to prove 
that the so-called "Gas Nuisance" was due to the volatile tar- 
water discharged into the sewer at the Lowell Gas Works, 
this water not having been sufficiently deprived of the odor- 
ous or volatile principles of the tar, so that it could, without 
offence to anyone, be carried through the public sewer. We 
prepared an ultimatum to present to the Gas Company, but 
before delivering it, we found that the trouble was no longer 
in evidence. 

Upon further investigation, we found that the Gas Com- 
pany had greatly increased their capacity for making coal gas 
and, at the same time, diminished their output of water gas. 
In this way, the amount of tar-water was not in excess of 
the capacity of their filter beds. During the summer, they 
have been building new and larger filter beds, which are not 
yet in operation. 

These changes, it seemed to us, would be likely to remedy 
the trouble, and we were very glad to let the matter rest, 
hoping that at last a nuisance had been abated which, for 
years, was a source of irritation to all concerned. 

Early in April, Mr. W. C. Doherty was elected to repre- 
sent the Board on the Plumbing Commission, and Mr. D. J. 



BOARD OF HEALTH 11 

Pendergast was re-elected as the practical plumber of that 
commission, to serve one year from June 1st, 1904. 

For failure to comply with the requirements of the Stat- 
utes of the Commonwealth and the Regulations of the Board 
of Health in regard to the burial of the body of a person dying 
with a contagious disease, the undertaker's license of John J. 
O'Connell & Co. was revoked for one month, from Sept. 1 to 
Oct. 1, 1904. The particular offence was that Messrs. O'Con- 
nell & Co. allowed a public funeral and permitted four young 
boys to act as bearers in a case where the deceased died with 
diphtheria. 

For allowing the father, who himself had diphtheria, to 
go in a public carriage to the cemetery for the burial of his 
child, who had died with diphtheria, the undertaker's license 
of Horace Ela was revoked 15 days, from Dec. 7 to Dec. 22, 
1904. These penalties were exacted for disciplinary purposes, 
the Board feeling that the undertakers were becoming too 
careless concerning their responsibilities in preventing the 
spread of contagious diseases. 

It seems unlikely that contagious diseases will ever be 
entirely eradicated, for coincidently with advance made by 
medical science in discovering the cause and applying means 
for the more certain cure of these zymotic affections, the 
great body of the public loses its fear of these diseases, be- 
cause, thanks to the efforts of Physicians and Health Boards, 
so few really die, and, not being all the time under the eye of 
an inspector, they allow the ill to mingle with the well. It is 
a matter of common report that, in many of the congested 
districts of our city, a placard on the door, announcing the 
presence within of one ill with a contagious disease, does not 
prevent this patient from going out and mingling with his 
fellows on the street. To further warn the public, we have 
amended our Rules, and have caused to be printed on the 
placards the notice that no one ill with any of these diseases 
will be allowed to go out of the house until permission has 
been obtained from the Board of Health. No doubt, it will 



12 ANNUAL REPORT. 

be necessary to exact in the Police Court the penalty for the 
infraction of this regulation. 



STABLES 

We have received this year nine applications for licenses 
to erect stables, five of which have been granted, and in four 
cases the petitioners have been giveu leave to withdraw. 

We realize that the horseless age has not yet arrived and 
that for horses stables must be built and we have granted 
permission for their erection in all cases except in residential 
sections too thickly settled, and where the proposed stable 
would be a positive nuisance to the neighborhood. 

In the Archambault cause, the "cause celebre" we were 
asked to grant a license for a stable to accommodate four 
horses, in a building, the upper part of which consisted of 
nine tenements, the stable thus being directly underneath said 
tenements. This proposition, of course, we could not for a 
moment consider. 

Every application for a stable license which we have 
received has been advertised in the newspapers and whenever 
any objection has appeared, a hearing has been granted. 
And in all cases, both with and without hearings, the Board 
has personally visited the premises before acting on the peti- 
tions. In every case, restrictions as to drainage, frequency of 
removal of manure, and other hygienic precautions have been 
made a condition of the granting of the license. 



BOARD OF HEALTH 13 

INSPECTOR OF PROVISIONS. 



Lowell, Mass., Jan. 9, 1905. 

To the Board of Health, Lowell, Mass.: 

Gentlemen: — I take pleasure in rendering you a report as 
Inspector of Provisions for the eleven months that I have 
served. 

I have made a thorough inspection of all the wholesale 
and retail meat and fish markets, as well as the wholesale 
produce dealers where perishable goods used as food are kept 
for sale. In the time mentioned, I have made one thousand, 
three hundred and twenty (1.320) visits, making thirty (30) 
visits to a section and taking one section each week. 

During my first visits, I found conditions such that I had 
to give strict warning to some of the dealers to keep their 
stores clean and to handle their meats in such a way that they 
could be kept clean and fit for food. In a few cases, I found 
it necessary to destroy parts of veal, bad meats, fowl, etc. 

I made no prosecutions, as I found by constant visits, 
that, as a whole, there had been a vast improvement, not only 
in meats, but also in the way in which they were handled. 

I have paid strict attention to the condition in which re- 
frigerators are kept, and can say that this one thing alone has 
a great deal to do with keeping the meats in a wholesome 
condition and free from pathogenic germs. 

I would like to say a word about the poultry that is be- 
ing sold in our city every day. A lady bought a 12 1-2 lb. 
turkey at 23 cents a pound, with the head on and undrawn, 
and I dressed it for her. The head and drawings weighed 
just two lbs., leaving but 10 1-2 lbs. That lady paid over 
27 cents a pound for her turkey; so a person who buys 



14 ANNUAL RKPORT 

dressed and drawn poultry is getting it cheaper at 25 cents 
a pound than undressed at three to five cents less a pound. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN M. FARRELL, 

Inspector Meat and Provisions. 



Lowell, Mass., Jan. 2, 1905. 

H. H. Knapp, Agent Board of Health: 

Sir: — The following is a report of the work done by me 
for the year ending Dec. 31, 1904: 

Number of applications for permits to do plumbing: 

New T buildings 167 

Old buildings 294 

Total 461 

Number of visits new buildings 315 

Number of visits old buildings 480 

Total 795 

Respectfully, 

STEPHEN GARRITY, 

Plumbing Inspector. 



BOARD OF HEALTH 15 

Lowell, Mass., Dec. 31, 1904. 

The following is a report of the work done by the 
Plumbing Commission from Dec. 31, 1903, to Dec. 31, 1904: 

Whole number of applicants for examination 34 

For Master Plumbers' licenses 15 

For Master Plumbers' licenses, passed 8 

For Master Plumbers' licenses, failed 7 

For Journeymen Plumbers' licenses 19 

For Journeymen Plumbers' licenses, passed 9 

For Journeymen Plumbers' licenses, failed 10 



'■} 



Master Plumbers' licenses granted to Wm. J. Dunn, Joseph 
Harvey, Edward Murphy, Fred E. Whitney, Chas. E. 
Bourrett, Patrick F. Welch, John Kelley, Thomas F. 
Sheehan. 



> 



Journeymen Plumbers' licenses granted to Irving Wright, 
J. B. Halloran, P. Curran, J. Fahey, James Doherty, M. 
Carroll, James Bowers, J. Lennox, Fred Thissell. 



DENNIS J. PENDEBGAST 



Secretary. 

BOARD OF HEALTH IN ACCOUNT WITH PLUMBING 

COMMISSION. 

Forwarded from 1903 f 5 14 

Received from examinations and renewals. 62 50 

$67 64 

1904. Cr. 

April 9. Paid D. J. Pendergast $15 00 

Sept. 26. Paid D. J. Pendergast 10 00 

N o v. 29. Paid D. J. Pendergast 15 00 

$40 00 

Dec. 30, 1904, cash on hand $27 64 



16 ANNUAL REPORT 

COMPILATION OF INSPECTORS' RETURNS. 

Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1904. 

Tenements 3883 

Stores 312 

Sinks 4034 

Water closets 4957 

Rath tubs 87 

Basins 116 

Set tubs 37 

Cellars 1185 

Urinals 39 

Refrigerators 32 

Vaults 174 

Barns 115 

House drains . 825 

Ash chutes 39 

School houses 10 

Engine houses . . 13 

Bakeries 82 

Barber shops 120 

Steam power and heating plants 48 

Dry wells 29 

Hen houses id 

Complaints 289 

Notices to abate the following nuisances were sent from 
this office during the year 1904: 

Untrapped sinks 11 

Unsealed sink traps 4 

No water supply to sinks 15 

Improperly trapped sinks 4 

Clogged sink wastes 18 

Defective and leaky sink traps 12 

Filthy and dilapidated woodwork around sink 4 

Leaky sink wastes 8 

No cover for sink trap 2 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



17 



No water supply to water closet 54 

Filthy and dilapidated woodwork around 

water closet 7 

Clogged water closet 72 

Broken water closet bowls 13 

Leaky hopper cocks to water closet 7 

Leaky water closets 17 

Filthy water closet apartments 15 

No cover for water closet trap 4 

Insufficient water supply to water closet 8 

Untrapped water closets 1 

Unsealed water closet trap 1 

Cracked and leaky sinks 4 

Old mattresses in cellar 3 

Rubbish in cellar 38 

Water in cellar 4 

Swill, ashes and rubbish in yard 124 

Manure in yard 2 

Rubbish in yard 2 

Open joints in soil, waste and ventilation pipes 15 

Improperly constructed soil and waste pipes . . 3 

Defective cover to house trap 1 

Broken and leaky wash bowls 2 

Leaky roofs 7 

Filthy tenements 5 

Overflowing dry wells 4 

Clogged drains 17 

Open drains 4 

Uncovered dry well 1 

Uncovered vault 1 

Dilapidated privy seats 2 

To connect with street sewer 5 

To furnish water closet facilities 2 

Burst and leaky water pipes 16 

Clean ash pits 1 

Discontinue stable 1 

Whitewash ceilings and walls 1 



18 ANNUAL REPORT 

Build dry well 1 

Furnish receptacles for sweepings and rubbish 1 

Babbits in tenement 1 

To clean vaults 32 

To remove swine 4 

To remove fowl 1 

Legal notices served 79 

Permits given to T. F. Fay to clean vaults 12:> 

Permits given to T. F. Fay to clean dry wells 33 

Permits given to T. F. Fay to clean barn cellars i 

Permits given to T. F. Fay to clean water closets 2 

Permits given to F. A. Fox to clean vaults -11 

Permits given to F. A. Fox to clean dry wells. . . 8 



BOAKD OF HEALTH 19 

OFFICE INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS. 



Lowell, Mass., Dec. 27, 1904. 

To the Board of Health, Lowell, Mass.: 

Dear Sirs: — As is customary, I herewith submit my an- 
nual report for the year ending 1904. 

Since the first of January, 1904, as Inspector of Animals 
for the City of Lowell, I have personally examined five hun- 
dred and thirty animals for contagious diseases, identified and 
released two hundred and sixty-eight cows, and have looked 
up and reported to the Cattle Bureau of the State Board of 
Agriculture the arrival of twenty beef animals to be slaught- 
ered and used as food. 

There have been twenty-five horses quarantined, having 
glanders; and after being tested by the State Cattle Bureau, 
twenty-two reacted and were killed and the stables in which 
they were kept have been thoroughly disinfected; two were 
released as they were found free from glanders, and one still 
remains in quarantine awaiting the results of the Cattle 
Bureau tests. There were also ten horses reported to me as 
showing signs of glanders, which I did not deem proper to 
put in quarantine, after a careful examination. The danger 
from glanders is still a serious problem for this city, as it is 
a center to which are brought old worn-out horses, which 
are apt to have glanders, and these cases are apt to be a 
starting point from which it will get such a foothold before 
recovery that it will be hard to stop. 

There have been two hundred and sixty-eight cows 
brought into the City by different parties, which have been 
identified and released by me. 

I have examined and reported on the sanitary conditions, 
as regards air, light, water, cleanliness, etc., of forty-two 



20 ANNUAL REPORT 

stables in which milk cows were kept, and forwarded the 
data to the State Cattle Bureau. In these forty-two stables, 
I have made a ph'ysical examination of two hundred and 
sixty-four cows, two hundred and twenty swine, seven calves, 
two oxen, and two bulls; from which five cows have been put 
in quarantine as being badly affected with tuberculosis. 

These five milk cows have been examined by an agent of 
the State Cattle Bureau and my diagnosis confirmed, after 
which a price has been agreed upon with the owner and the 
cattle killed and a post-mortem made, and one out of the five 
showed no lesions of the disease. The others were diseased. 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. A. SHERMAN, D. V. S. M. D., 

Inspector of Animals, 

Lowell, Mass. 



CASES OF CONTAGIOUS DISEASES REPORTED. 

1904 ( 1903 1902 1901 1900 

Diphtheria, including Croup. . . 272 272 667 803 157 

Scarlet Fever 120 146 116 65 80 

Measles 429 55 785 356 114 

Typhoid Fever 48 238 83 70 85 

Smallpox 5 11 54 12 23 



Totals 874 722 1705 1306 459 



BOARD OF HEALTH 21 
DEATHS FROM CONTAGIOUS DISEASES. 

1904 1903 1903 1901 1900 

Diphtheria, including Croup. . 34 34 76 

Scarlet Fever 5 8 5 

Measles 14 8 

Typhoid; Fever 17 26 16 

Smallpox 1 4 

Totals 71 68 109 155 45 



117 


27 


3 





17 


1 


18 


17 









CASES OF DIPHTHEPvIA AND CROUP REPORTED TO THE 
BOARD OF HEALTH FOR THE YEAR 1904. 

Diphtheria. Croup. 
Cases. Dearths Cases.Deaths. 

January 19 2 2 2 

February 7 1 2 1 

March 12 1 ' 

April 14 1 

May 12 1 1 

June 2,9 1 

July 5 

August 17 5 

September 28 2 1 

October 55 6 

November 33 6 

December 35 5 

Totals 266 29 6 5 

Mortality of Diphtheria, 11 per cent. 
Mortality of Croup, 83 per cent. 



22 ANNUAL REPORT 

MORTALITY OF DIPHTHERIA. 

1894 33.0 per cent. 

Antitoxin treatment 1895 44.0 per cent. 

1896 43.0 per cent. 

1897 23.0 per cent. 

1898 23.0 per cent. 

1899 : 18.0 per cent. 

1900 10.0 per cent. 

1901 12.0 per cent. 

1902 9.5 per cent. 

1903 . . : 10.5 per cent. 

1904 11.0 per cent. 



Lowell, Mass., Jan. 10, 1905. 

To the Members of the Board of Health, 
Lowell, Mass.: 

Gentlemen: — I have the honor hereby to submit a report 
of tin 1 work done in the Bacteriological Laboratory during the 
year ending Dec. 31, 1904. 

DIPHTHERIA. 

Summary of Cultures Examined. 

Whole 
For Diagnosis. For Release. No Number 

Positive. Negative. Positive. Negative. Result. Examined. 

^January 15 45 13 20 2 95 

February 10 37 18 16 1 82 

March 13 131 17 22 1 184 

April 13 27 7 8 55 

May 15 18 10 11 1 55 

June 21 70 43 28 162 

July 10 16 11 25 1 63 



BOARD OF HEALTH 23 

Whole 

For Diagnosis. For Release. No Number 

Positive. Negative. Positive. Negative. Result. Examined. 

August 19 30 6 5 60 

September 25 32 14 20 1 92 

October 42 37 44 47 5 175 

November 35 58 45 47 6 191 



December 30 40 24 29 2 12. r 



24S 541 252 278 20 1339 

During the year, seven families infected with diphtheria 
and referred by physicians to the Health Department for 
treatment were attended at their homes. These seven fam- 
ilies were found to contain thirty-one individuals, fifteen of 
whom had diphtheria. Under treatment all of them recov- 
ered. 

The work was necessarily done under very unfavorable 
conditions, many of the cases being seen in a late stage of the 
disease. Two families had each lost a member by the disease 
before the Department took charge. 

As soon as a notification of such a case was received at 
the office, an immediate visit was made. Antitoxin was giv- 
en at once 1 to any cases In which there was little doubt of the 
nature of the disease, without waiting for the result of a cul- 
ture. A general examination with cultures of all exposed was 
made and the family isolated until the results of the cultures 
were found. A single large dose of antitoxin was given to 
all found infected with the disease, and they were quaran- 
tined from the i est of the family. In no case was it neces- 
sary to repeat the dose of antitoxin. 

Four cases developed paralysis, two of the pharynx, one 
of the larynx, and one of the bladder. One patient had an at- 
tack of chicken-pox during the course of her diphtheria. All 
the paralyses passed off gradually. 

One group of cases furnishes an excellent example of the 
importance of checking the spread of the disease in a crowded 



24 ANNUAL REPORT 

tenement block. A single case was referred to the Depart- 
ment. An examination showed that three families living in 
different tenements in the same block and containing eleven 
individuals had been exposed continuously to the case. Cul- 
tures from them showed that four others, distributed through 
the three families, were already infected with the disease. 

The five cases were isolated in two tenements and given 
antitoxin, and all recovered. Only one additional case de- 
veloped, the nursing mother of one of the first cases. 

On March 14th, a culture taken by the attendant physi- 
cian from a male prisoner in the Lowell Jail, suffering from a 
sore throat, showed the presence of the bacillus of diphtheria. 
This case was at once isolated and a general examination of 
all the male prisoners, the women working in the laundry, 
and the officers exposed was made, 85 primary cultures being 
taken. Three additional cases were found in this way, which 
were also isolated. At the end of the month, negative cul- 
tures were obtained from the four cases. In all, 101 cultures 
were examined. 

In a period of four days, nine cases of diphtheria having 
appeared on one milk route, on June 2d the Milk Inspector 
and Bacteriologist were sent out to make an investigation. 
Four farms from which the milk came were visited and 
cultures taken from 26 individuals. Of these, only one 
proved positive. This positive culture was from the man 
whose work was to collect the milk and distribute it to the 
consumers. 

He had been working steadily all the time, had not been 
feeling ill, and his wife and child had remained uninfected. 
He was quarantined under a physician's care at once and all 
the milk-cans and utensils were disinfected. A negative 
culture was obtained from him twelve days later. 

The first case on the route was reported May 30th. No 
new ones appeared after June 10th. One case proved fatal. 



BOARD OF HEALTH 25 

RECURRENCE OF DIPHTHERIA. 

The records of the Laboratory since the adoption of the 
card system in 1001 show four cases of the recurrence of 
diphtheria. 

Case One. A girl of 6 years; case reported with positive 
culture, May 29, 1901; antitoxin given; recovered; negative 
culture, June 19th. 

Second attack reported May 20, 1902, with positive cul- 
ture; antitoxin given; recovered; negative culture June 13th. 

Case Two. A boy of 2 years; .reported with positive 
culture July 20, 1902; antitoxin given; recovered; negatiye 
culture March 6th. 

Second attack reported with positive culture April 25, 
1904; antitoxin given; recovered; negative culture May 17th. 

Case Three. A boy of 2 1-2 years; reported with positive 
culture July 20, 1902; antitoxin given; recoverd; negative 
culture Aug. 11th. 

Second attack reported, With positive culture, Oct. 6, 1904 
antitoxin given; died Oct. 15th. 

Case Four. A boy of 2 1-2 years; reported April 11, 
1903; antitoxin given; recovered; negative culture April 27th. 

Second attack reported with positve culture Sept. 27, 
1904; antitoxin given; died Oct. 9t^i. 



USE OF ANTITOXIN. 



Per cent. 
Cases. Percent. Died, of deaths. 



Diphtheria 272 

Antitoxin used 252 93 28 11 

Antiaoxin not used 20 7 6 30 



26 



ANNUAL REPORT 



QUARANTINE PERIOD. 

In 230 cases, the average time of quarantine was 10 days. 
The longest case lasted 55 days. 

EXAMINA- 
TION OF 
TUBERCULOSIS. SPUTUM. 

Whole 
Number 
Positive. Negative. Examined. 

January 5 14 

February 5 10 21 

March 6 20 26 

April 4 15 10 

May 7 23 30 

June 10 8 18 

July 11 10 21 

August 4 10 14 

September 14 8 22 

October 11 11 22 

November 7 14 21 

December 8 21 20 

02 . 165 257 



TYPHOID FEVER. 



Examination of Blood for Widal Reaction. 

Whole 

Positive. Negative. Atypical. No Result. Number. 

Jauuary 5 3 1 

February 5 3 2 10 

March 1 5 6 

April 2 1 12 

May 2 11 13 

June 2 4 6 

July 2 10 12 

August 4 2 6 

September 2 6 1 



BOARD OF HEALTH 27 

Whole 
Positive. Negative. Atypical. No Result. Number. 

October 8 !> 1 18 

November 4 10 14 

December : 4 11 1 16 



41 83 4 3 131 



MALARIA. 



Seven spec i mens of blood were examined for the pres- 
ence of the Malarial Organism, four of which were positive. 

In addition a number of examinations were made for 
Pus Bacteria, the Gonococcns, the bacillus of Influenza, and 
the pneumococcal. 



THOMAS B. SMITH, M. D., 



Bacteriologist. 



In the Board of Health Report for 1900 occurs the follow- 
ing quotation: "Diphtheria requires the taking of a culture 
if the membrane is not discernable, then a visit to the office 
for antitoxin and return for the purpose of injection, and for 
two days, at least, double the care given for the ordinary dis- 
ease. It is not just to expect a busy practitioner to give the 
required time to a disease that is also dangerous, possibly, to 
his other patients, without compensation, and therefore we re- 
quest that any physician who feels that he cannot give the 
attention that should be awarded a person sick with diph- 
theria, involving 'the use of antitoxin, to request such patient 
to send at once to the Health Office, and a quick response 
will be given to the notification. 

This method has in view the saving of the lives of many 
who otherwise would be allowed to wait until the poisonous 
toxin has so permeated the system that it could not be neu- 
tralized by the antidote. We do not wish to interfere in any 
way with the rights of the physician or his patient, but if we 



28 ANNUAL REPORT 

are right in the belief that the great mortality in the dis- 
ease comes from neglect to apply the proper remedy, this de- 
partment is responsible if no note of warning is sounded, that 
some precaution by the patient's parents or friends, if the at- 
tending physician, for any reason, declines or refuses to use 
every method known to science to save life from this treach- 
erous disease. 

In 1903, eight families containing thirty-eight members 
were transferred by the reporting physician to the care and 
treatment of the Health Department, and were attended at 
their homes. Of the thirty-eight exposed, seventeen were 
found to have diphtheria. Of the seventeen cases, but one 
died, and this patient was not put under our care until the 
seventh day of her sickness. 

In 1904, seven families were turned over by physicians 
to us for treatment, containing thirty-one individuals, fifteen 
of whom had diphtheria, and under treatment by the depart- 
ment, ALL recovered. 

In 1903, there were thirty-four (34) deaths. 

In 1904, there were thirty-four (34) deaths. 

From the experience acquired during the last five years 
in the use and the decrement in the death rate from the in- 
troduction of antitoxin, we believe it has been demonstrated 
that but few, if any, deaths should result from this disease, 
and if any do occur, it is because antitoxin was administered 
so late in the disease that the poisons or toxins were present 
in the blood in overwhelming quantity, making it impossible 
for any antidote to be effectual. 

In looking over the returns, it seems to us that in the ma- 
jority of cases when death occurred, it was due to the fact 
that the physician was called late. Another bad feature of 
these neglected cases is the post diphtheritic paralysis, which 
is the result of the diphtheritic poison, and not, as is errone- 
ously thought by *some people, a sequence of the use of anti- 
toxin. 

The number of deaths in 1904 ought never to recur again 
in the annual records of the Department, and as having per- 



BOARD OF HEALTH 29 

haps a bearing upon its diminution, we wish to remove the 
prejudice that care and treatment from the Health Depart- 
ment casts any stain upon the family as pauperizing in any 
degree the recipients. The Revised Laws of the Common- 
wealth make it obligatory upon every city to provide for the 
treatment of every person attacked with a contagious disease. 

Acts of 1902, Chapter 213, Section 2. „ 

"No person, for whose care and maintenance a city or 
town of the Commonwealth has incurred expense in conse- 
quence of Smallpox, Diphtheria, Scarlet Fever, or other dis- 
ease dangerous to the public health, shall be deemed to be a 
pauper by reason of such expenditure." 

The Board wishes to express its appreciation of the 
faithful and successful work of its Bacteriologist, both in the 
Laboratory and in the homes of the sick, where he has been 
sent to take medical charge of diphtheria cases* that have 
been placed in our hands under the invitation quoted from 
the Report of 1900. 

Our expense, at the Lowell Hospital for 1901 was $490-49. 
as compared with $260.00 for 1903. 

Fay Hazard $ 8 57 

Ada White 7 14 

Abe Weiss 1 42 

William McGrath 17 14 

Sarah McDonald 28 57 

Rosanna McDonald 28 57 

Margaret McDonald 28 57 

Fred McDonald 28 57 

Carrie Carroll 18 57 

Gertrude Anderson 25 86 

Herbert Phillips 17 14 



Amount carried forward $000 00 



30 ANNUAL REPORT 

Amount brought forward $000 00 

Janette Beckwith 7 00 

Bertie Beckwith 11 00 

Albert Terrence 1 43 

Flora Richards 7 14 

Thomas Breen 22 86 

Sadie Breen 22 86 

Mary Coggins 2 86 

Irene Lyman :i 00 

Mary Lyman 4 00 

William Lyman 6 29 

Madeline Daly 35 71 

Margaret Fagan 15 71 

Percy Gibson 18 57 

Mabel Lambert 5 25 

Katharine Warren 5 25 

Frank Hart 40 00 

Lizzie Breen 21 43 

Marietta Breaker 22 86 

Ada Wilmott 27 14 



|400 40 



SCARLET FEVER. 

1904 1903 1W2 

Cases reported 120 146 116 

Deaths 5 8 5 

Per cent, total cases 4 5 4 

Reported Cases. 

January 21 

February 16 

March 5 

April 11 

May 8 

June 8 



1901 




1900 


65 




80 


6 







9 







Deaths 






'A 






1 

































BOARD OF HEALTH 3 

Reported Cases. Deaths. 

July 6 1 

August 5 

September 11 () 

October 13 

Novejmber 1) 

December 7 



120 



MEASLES. 



Reported Cases. Deaths. 

January 26 

February 17 

March 13 1 

April , . . . 42 

May 133 2 

.June 128 4 

.July 65 6 

August 1 

September 1 

October 1 

November .' 2 

December 1 



429 



14 



TYPHOID FEVER. 



Reported Cases. Death 

January 5 1 

February 3 3 

March , 3 4 

April 2 



32 ANNUAL REPORT 

Reported Cases. Deaths. 

May 2 

June • 1 

July 4 3 

August 8 1 

September 4 1 

October 7 1 

November 3 2 

December 7 

48 17 



TYPHOID FEVER. 

Population. Reported Cases. Deaths. 

Total 1904 104,402 48 17 

Total 1903 101,959 238 26 

Total 19021 99,574 83 16 

Total 1901 94,969 70 18 

Total 1900 94,969 85 17 

Total 1899 90,114 57 17 

Total 1898 87,000 119 24 

Total 1897 87,000 105 18 

Total 1896 85,700 178 36 

Total 1895 84,359 172 33 

Total 1894 83,026 282 50 

Total 1893 81,694 160 53 

Total 1892 80,361 373 75 

Total 1891 79,029 293 77 

Total 1890 77,696 454 123 

A decrease from 1.58 per thousand inhabitants to .16 in 
fifteen years. 



BOARD OF HEALTH 33 

PLACES OF DEATH. 

Ward 1 2 

Ward 2 

Ward 3 1 

Ward 4 2 

Ward 5 

Ward 6 1 

Ward 7 2 

Ward 8 1 

Ward 9 

Almshouse 

St. John's Hospital , 3 

Lowell Hospital 5 

Lowell General Hospital 

17 

Males 5 

Females 12 

Oldest 62 years 

Youngest 5 years 



DEATHS FROM CHOLERA INFANTUM. 

1904 

January 

February 

March 

Total first quarter. 1 1 

1904 1903 1902 1901 1900 1899 

April 1 

May 

June 2 

Total second quarter 3 4 4 5 5 14 



1903 


1902 


1901 


1900 


1899 

















1 




















1 





















1 


1 


1 


1 





1 


3 


3 


4 


5 


12 



34 



ANNUAL REPORT 



1904 

July 47 

August 37 

September 22 

Total third quarter.. 106 

1904 

October , . . . 3 

November 1 

December 



1903 


1902 


1901 


1900 


1899 


61 


59 


27 


66 


77 


63 


22 


38 


28 


38 


21 


20 


24 


20 


39 



145 101 



Total fourth quarter 4 
Total for the year... 113 



89 114 154 



1903 


1902 


1901 


1900 


1899 


7 


1 


4 


10 


1 





1 





1 


1 









4 


1 





7 


2 


12 


8 


57 


107 


99 


131 


176 



PRINCIPAL CAUSES OF DEATH. 



1904 1903 1902 1901 1900 

Cholera Infantum and other 

Diarrhoeal Diseases 243 176 120 120 142 

Phthisis and other Tubercu- 
loses 143 132 164 170 186 

Pneumonia and Bronchitis. . 247 263 278 310 282 

Congenital Debility 148 140 172 156 137 

Heart Disease 132 153 219 197 190 

Typhoid Fever 17 26 16 18 17 

Apoplexy and Paralysis 118 75 140 106 108 

Old Age 52 56 34 40 40 

Diseases of the brain (un- 
classified) 18 92 35 49 41 

Convulsions 19 25 43 45 41 

Diseases of the Kidneys.... 85 104 77 82 73 

Meningitis 59 63. 73 67 65 

Diphtheria and Croup 34 34 76 117 27 

All other causes 421 559 488 561 500 

Total for the year 1736 1898 1935 2038 1849 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



35 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



Deaths, male . 
Deaths, female 



1904 


1903 


1902 


1901 


1900 


860 


945 


971 


1010 


947 


876 


953 


964 


1028 


902 



1736 1898 1935 2038 1849 



Children under one year. . . . 
Children under two years . . . 
Children under five years . . . 
Per cent, of total deaths 

under five years 38.8 38.8 38.1 39.2 



498 


554 


519 


539 


512 


590 


660 


618 


657 


608 


673 


738 


738 


799 


687 



37.1 



Birthplace. Of Deceased. 

Lowell 818 

Massachusetts, elsewhere 95 

Other states 262 

Ireland 271 

Canada 155 

Great Britain 75 

Other Countries 49 

Unknown 11 

Total 1736 



Of Parents. 

170 

176 
486 
1062 
913 
241 
234 
190 



3472 



PLACES OF DEATH. 

Ward 1 138 

Ward 2 141 

Ward 3 157 

Ward 4 146 



36 ANNUAL REPORT 

PLACES OF DEATH— Continued. 

Ward 5 138 

Ward 6 170 

Ward 7 347 

Ward 8 121 

Ward 9 127 

Almshouse 97 

Lowell Hospital . . . 53 

Lowell General Hospital 25 

St John's Hospital 74 

Small Pox Hospital 1 

Emergency Hospital 1 



1736 

Still Births during the year 143 



PLACES OF INTERMENT. 

St. Patrick's Cemetery 648 

Edson Cemetery 365 

Lowell Cemetery 85 

St. Joseph's Cemetery 427 

St. Peter's Cemetery 64 

Other Cemeteries 3 

Removed 144 



1736 



DEATHS IN 1904, COMPARED WITH 1903. 

Decrease. Increase. 

Cholera .Infantum and other diarrhoeal diseases 67 

Phthisis and other Tuberculoses 11 



BOARD OF HEALTH 37 

DEATHS IN 1904, COMPARED WITH 1903— Continued. 

Decrease. Increase. 

Pneumonia and Bronchitis . 16 

Congenital Debility 8 

Heart Disease 21 

Typhoid Fever 9 

Apoplexy and Paralysis 43 

Old Age i 4 

Diseases of the brain (unclassified) 74 

Convulsions 6 

Diseases of the Kidneys 19 

Meningitis 4 

Diphtheria and Croup 

All other causes 138 

291 129 
Total decrease 162 



DEATH RATE. 

Year. 

Population, census 1890 

estimated 1891 

estimated 1892 

estimated 1893 

estimated 1894 

census 1895 

estimated 1896 

estimated 1897 

estimated 1898 

estimated 1899 

census 1900 

estimated 1901 

estimated 1902 

estimated 1903 

estimated 1904 



Population. 


Deaths. 


. Death 
Rate. 


77,696 


1959 


25.21 


79,029 


1972 


24.95 


80,361 


2224 


27.67 


81,694 


2094 


25.62 


83,026 


1775 


21.28 


84,359 


1857 


22.01 


85,700 


1901 


22.18 


87,000 


1855 


21.33 


87,tf00 


1808 


20.78 


90,114 


1848 


20.50 


94,969 


1849 


19.47 


94,969 


2038 


21.45 


99,574 


1935 


19.43 


101,959 


1898 


18.61 


104,402 


1736 


16.62 



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44 



ANNUAL REPORT 



COLLECTION OF ASHES. 

1904 1903 1902 

January 2260 loads 1727 loads 2660 loads 

February 2360 loads 1564 loads 2451 loads 

March 2378 loads 1804 loads 2578 loads 

April 2236 loads 1725 loads 2556 loads 

May 1825 loads 1506 loads 1950 loads 

June 1329 loads 1300 loads 1300 loads 

July 1056 loads 1331 loads 1243 loads 

August 1160 loads 1200 loads 1200 loads 

September 1200 loads 1202 loads 1189 loads 

October 1349 loads 1414 loads 1414 loads 

November 1652 loads 1537 loads 1245 loads 

December 1997 loads 2033 loads 1456 loads 

20,802 loads 18,343 loads 21,242 loads 



Cost of Collection. Labor Pay Roll. 

1891 $ 8,001 19 

1892 9,857 42 

1893 11,542 94 

1894 12,087 93 

1895 10,591 40 

1896 11,311 25 

1897 12,793 15 

1898 11,209 70 

1899 10,903 30 

1900 10,665 35 

1901 , 10,651 28 

1902 10,454 80 

1903 9,691 50 

1904 10,714 95 

536 loads paper. 



BOARD OF HEALTH 45 

MARKET AND HOSPITAL REFUSE BURNED AT 

CREMATOR JAN. 1, 1904 to 1905. 

12 tons hospital refuse. 

291 tons market refuse. 

56 dogs. 

61 cats. 

40 mattresses. 

11 loads bedding. 

4 barrels clothing. 

10 pillows. 

2 lounges. 



NUMBER OF LOADS SWILL COLLECTED. 

1904 1903 1902 

January 353 333 322 

February 321 282 280 

March ' . . 328 29pL 286 

April 298 296 301 

May 315 308 308 

June 329 328 312 

July 335 335 367 

August 443 369 307 

September 480 429 456 

October 386 384 419 

November/ , 357 317 315 

December 407 359 362 

4352 4031 4035 

Total collections for 1904 4352 loads 

Total collections for 1903 4031 loads 

Total collections for 1902 4035 loads 

Total collections for 1901 3861 loads 

Total collections for 1900 4217 loads 



46 ANNUAL REPORT 

SWILL ACCOUNT. 



1904 

January f 253 12 

February 218 87 

March 241 88 

April 232 50 

May 201 88 

June 251 88 

July 256 75 

August 310 00 

September 372 75 

October 326 93 

November 321 25 

December 199 60 

Swill Permits . . 185 00 

Swill Licenses.... 135 00 



1,507 41 



1903 


1902 


1901 


$ 331 25 


$ 203 00 


| 242 00 


228 12 


222 00 


145 00 


284, 12 


180 00 


276 00 


259 74 


220 50 


239 70 


212 99 


308 88 


261 00 


251 23 


228 13 


365 00 


248 74 


255 00 


161 00 


289 36 


308 62 


217 00 


319 99 


257 49 


160 00 


286 23 


322 87 


2flL0 00 


242) 49 


234 23 


228 50 


220 61 


343 00 


328 00 


125 00 


161 00 


175 00 


$3,299 87 


|3,244 72 


$3,008 20 



Swill Exchanged 
for Hay $2,047 84 1,584 72 883 77 895 04 



$5,555 25 $4,884 59 $4,128 49 $3,903 24 



SWILL LICENSES. 

Lowell Rendering Co. 

John H. Farris Lowell 

C. A. Hamblett Dracut 

Charles Dadian Billerica 

Fen wick Nichols Dracut 

J. P. Eaton Chelmsford 

C. A. Hamblett Lowell 

McDonald Bros Lowell 



BOARD OF HEALTH 47 

SWILL LICENSES— Continued. 

W. H. Barnes Dracut 

Joseph Viere Lowell 

Mrs. Nellie M, Remmes Lowell 

Herbert Parker Dracut 

W. F. Richardson Pelham 

Charles A. Jackson Dracut 

J. R. Hayes Dracut 

Jnmes B. Oarr Chelmsford 

Whitman & Pratt Dracut 

R. N. Maker Dracut 

O. S. Cumming-s Tyngsboro. 

Joseph Bowers Lowell 

Antonia Paiva Lowell 

George H. Stevens Dracut 

Harry F. Adams Chelmsford 

Independent Refining Co Dracut 



PERMITS TO TRANSPORT FROM YARD. 

C. D. Kent Pelham 

Louis Daigle Dracut 

A. Bouchard Dracut 

E. H. Choquette & Son Dracut 

Dracut Poor Farm : . . . . Dracut 

H. C. Greene Chelmsford 

Paul Vigeant Lowell 

N. C. Clairmont Dracut 

W. H. Peabody Pelham 

Fred U. Haskell Dracut 

Thomas H. Sherlock Dracut 

E. A. Gould Dracut 

C. O. Bobbins Chelmsford 



48 ANNUAL REPORT 

PERMITS TO TRANSPORT FROM YARD^-Continued. 

P. A. Bruorton Billerica 

Thomas Gourgeon Dracut 

E. C. Peril am Chelmsford 

G. W. Kenwick Westford 

Patrick Cogger Lowell 

O. J. Coburn Dracut 

John P. Tully Dracut 

Geo. E. Spaulding Chelmsford 

Daniel E. Cameron Dracut 

John M. Graves Dracut 

J. A. Davis Dunstable 

C. H. Parker ...... Dracut 

Charles A. Jackson Dracut 

Vinton McNutt Chelmsford 

William E. Biggs Wigginville 

J. B. Noel Chelmsford 

Mrs. Charles Jones Dracut 

O. P. Coburn Dracut 

J. J. McManmon Dracut 

H. T. Wheeler Dracut 

Charles Shugrue Westford 

C. E. Guthrue Dracut 

Charles E. Bunker Dracut 

J. L. Gregoire Dracut 

Joseph Albert Dracut 



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50 ANNUAL REPORT 

1904. FINANCIAL STATEMENT— EXPENDITURES. 

Pay Rolls. Office. 

January f 567 00 

February 539 00 

March : 539 00 

April 673 75 

May 539 00 

June 539 00 

July 673 75 

August 539 00 

September 539 00 

October 673 75 

November 539 00 

December 673 75 



17,035 00 



Pay Rolls. Yard. 

January f 2,402 95 

February 2,254 21 

March 2,239 35 

April 2,77115 

May 2,158 20 

June 2,099 10 

July 2,668 20 

August 2,119 40 

September 2,180 40 

October 2,678 75 

November 2,182 50 

December 2,719 30 

$28,473 51 
Small Pox, $163.75. 



BOARD OF HEALTH 51 

ANALYSIS OF PAY ROLLS OF 1904 COMPARED WITH 

1903. 

1904 1903 Decrease. Increase. 

Ashes |10,714 95 f 9,691 50 $1,023 45 

Swill . . 8,324 70 8„178 93 145 77 

Alleys and 

Dumps 3,554 05 3,40140 152 65 

General Inspec- 
tion 2,041 00 2,041 00 

Contagious In- 
spection . . . 1,281 00 1,277 50 3 50 

Repairs 4 50 117 57 113 07 

Insp ector of * { 

Plumbing . . 1,099 00 1,095 50 3 50 

Blacksmith . . 797 50 947 65 150 15 

Stable . . 2,297 56 2,269 62 27 94 

Agent 1,830 00 1,825 00 5 00 

Registrar 628 00 653 25 25 25 

Cremator .... 706 50 704 25 2 25 

Small Pox .... 163 75 61 50 102 25 

Fumigation . . 816 00 815 00 1 00 

Foreman 1,257 75 1,192 50 65 25 

Meat Inspector 156 00 156 00 

135,672 26 |34,272 17 |288 47 $1,688 56 

Total Increase $1,400 09 



ANALYSIS OF BILLS, 1904. 

Office Sundries. 

Advertising $ 10 08 

Board of Health Signs 31 51 

Bacteriological Department 95 21 

City of Worcester 37 14 

Coal 14 00 

Cremator 35 18 



52 ANNUAL REPORT 

ANALYSIS OF BILLS, 1904— Continued. 

Culture Taking 202 50 

Express 11 35 

Fumigating Supplies 73 51 

Gas Investigation 200 00 

Lowell Hospital 490 49 

Medical Services 449 00 

Mileage 20 00 

Massachusetts Ass'n Board of Health. . 8 00 

New Horse 175 00 

Plumbing Association 11 44 

Printing Annual Report 87 54 

Printed Supplies 226 15 

Rent of Cremator 75 00 

Repairing Small Pox Hospital 7 20 

Small Pox Bills 42 85 

Sundries 173 67 

Stamps and Stamped Envelopes 57 50 

Telephone 13 95 

Vaccine 72 99 



|2,621 26 



Yard. 

Blacksmith's Supplies f 259 00 

Corn and Meal 113 06 

Canvas Covers 36 00 

Cremator 155 34 

Electric Lights 27 10 

Fumigating Supplies 27 39 

Hay 25 50 

Hardware 6196 

Harness Supplies 152 58 



BOARD OF HEALTH 53 

ANALYSIS OF BILLS, 1904— Continued. 

Lumber 134 61 

New Harnesses 110 00 

New Wagon Wheels 323 04 

New Wagon 76 75 

New Wagon Supplies 63 14 

Oats 2,31188 

Repairs at Crematory . . . . 4 . 20 90 

Repairing Ambulance 25 70 

Repairing Harnesses 34 70 

Repairing Goddard Buggy 5 75 

Repairing Wagon 52 30 

Straw 336 08 

Sundries 538 90 

Veterinary Services 60 00 

Water Department 96 75 



1,048 43 



INCOME TRANSFERRED TO GENERAL FUND. 

Swill 13,187 41 

Swill Permits 185 00 

Swill Licenses 135 00 

Waste Paper 62 50 

Town of Chelmsford 114 28 

City of Worcester 18 57 

Rent of Bill Boards 26 67 

State, Small Pox 407 88 



1,137 31 



54 ANNUAL REPORT 

Total to General Fund 1904 #4,137 31 

Total to General Fund 1903 4,085 12 

Total to General Fund 1902 6,103 87 

Total to General Fund 1901 4,585 26 

Total to General Fund 1900 3,647 03 

Total to General Fund 1899 3,796 05 



SUMMARY 
Office 

Expend i- Appropri- 

tures ations Receipts Balance Deficit 

Salaries of Board $1,500 00 

Salary of Dr. Smith. . . 600 00 

Pay Rolls, Office 7,035 00 

$9,135 00 $9,161 25 $26 25 

Bills 2,62126 2,200 00 $175 70 $245 56 



Yard 

Pay Rolls 28,637 26 28,355 00 163 75 118 51 

Bills 5,048 43 5,000 00 48 43 



Small Pox 

Total Cost 1,010 02 489 50 520 52 

>,451 97 $45,205 75 $339 45 $26 25 $933 02 



BOARD OF HEALTH 55 



COST OF HEALTH DEPARTMENT FOR THE 

YEAR 1904. 

Salaries 

Salaries of Board $ 1,500 00 

Salary of Bacteriologist 600 00 

Pay Rolls, Office 7,035 00 

Pay Rolls, Yary 28,637 26 

Bills, Small Pox 1,010 02 

Bills, Office 2,621 26 

Bills, Yard 5,048 43 



$46,451 97 



Appropriations 

Office Salaries $ 9,16125 

Office Sundries 2,200 00 

Yard Labor 28,355 00 

Yard Sundries , 5,000 00 

Small Pox 489 50 

$45,205 75 

Receipts 339 45 

Deficit 933 02 



$46,478 22 
26 25 



,451 97 



56 ANNUAL REPORT 



Our horses were examined Dec. 24th, by Dr. Sherman, as 

per the following list: 

1. Bay Horse, "Sam," 16 years $ 30 00 

2. Black Horse, "Daddy," 17 years 60 00 

3. Brown Horse, "Billy," 14 years 120 00 

4. Black Horse, "Harry," 14 years 80 00 

5. Bay Horse, "Peter," 15 years 15 00 

6. Bay Mare, "Bridget," 12 years 25 00 

7. Bay Horse, "Jack," 12 years 100 00 

8. Bay Mare, "Sue," 14 years 20 00 

9. Black Horse, "Major," 12 years 100 00 

10. Bay Horse, "Baldy," 16 years 105 00 

11. Bay Horse, "Fred," 17 years 90 00 

12. Brown Mare, "Kate," 14 years 30 00 

13. Brown Mare, "Maggie," 17 years 10 00 

14. Bay Horse, "Duke," 18 years 40 00 

15. Gray Mare, "Grace," 12 years 120 00 

16. Black Horse, "Nigger," 13 years 40 00 

17. Bay Horse, "Joe," 13 years 120 00 

18. Gray Mare, "Mollie," 15 years 100 00 

19. Bay Mare, "Helen," 9 years 150 00 

20. Bay Horse, "Ned," 11 years 150 00 

21. Bay Horse, "Moxie," 10 years 105 00 

22. Black Horse, "Tom" 8 years 100 00 

23. Black Horse, 'John," 9 years 105 00 

24. Sorrel Horse, "Doctor," 17 years 65 00 

25. Gray Horse, "Tom," 15 years 15 00 

26. Bay Horse, "George," 9 years 115 00 

27. Bay Mare, "Sarah," 9 years 135 00 

28. Bay Mare, "Mollie," 7 years 165 00 

29. Bay Horse, "Tom," 10 years 65 00 

30. Brown Horse, "Jim," 10 years 140 00 



BOARD OF HEALTH 57 

31. Bay Mare, "Grace," 7 years 175 00 



5,690 00 



At least six of the above horses are unfit for service, and 
for the credit of the city should be replaced with younger 
animals. 



WAGONS AND SLEDS. 

1 Ambulance $ 175 00 

1 Hospital Wagon 15 00 

10 Double Ash Carts at flOO 1,000 00 

5 Single Ash Carts at $50 250 00 

8 Double Ash Sleds at $70 560 00 

4 Single Ash Sleds at $50 200 00 

10 Single Swill Sleds at $50 500 00 

1 Double Swill Wagon . 50 00 

11 Single Swill Wagons at $50. .' 550 00 

2 Coupes . . . . 425 00 

2 Paper Wagons at $100 200 00 

1 Sleigh 15 00 

2 Pungs at $35 70 00 

1 Concord Wagon 40 00 

2 Mover Buggies at $100 200 00 

2 Goddard Buggies 315 00 

1 Covered Sleigh 20 00 

2 New Paper Sleds at $75 150 00 

$4,735 00 



58 



ANNUAL REPORT 



HARNESSES AND ROBES. 

1 Set Double Harnesses for ambulance. 

2 Sets Single Harnesses for ambulance. 

10 Single Harnesses at $20 

10 Double Harnesses at $20 

35 Halters 

4 Horse Covers 

2 Woolen Robes 

32 Baker Stable Blankets 

3 Street Blankets 

1 Rubber Lap Robe 

15 Surcingles 

20 Curry Combs and Brushes 

10 Canvas Covers for ash carts 

12 Mane Brushes 

3 Under Harness Street Blankets 

2 Large Canvases 

2 Sponges 

1 Extra Heavy Saddle 

13 Collars 

9 Collar Pads 

3 Buffalo Robes 

9 Harness Pads 

8 Zinc Pads 

1 Sheepskin 

4 Sets Reins 

5 Trace Girths 

6 Shaft Lugs 

4 Sets Hold-back Straps 

4 Saddle Girths 

4 Summer Blankets 

33 Stall Straps 

17 String Bells 

4 Light Harnesses 

32 Square Shovels 



$ 25 


00 


25 


00 


200 


00 


200 


00 


8 


00 


14 


00 


8 


00 


110 


00 


12 


00 


2 


00 


2 


50 


10 


00 


30 


00 


2 


00 


21 


00 


10 


00 


1 


50 


20 


00 


50 


00 


4 


50 


25 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


2 


00 


5 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


3 


00 


7 


00 


12 


00 


100 


00 


16 


00 



$935 50 



BOARD OF HEALTH 59 

SUMMARY. 

Horses $2,690 00 

Wagons and Sleds 4,735 00 

Harnesses and Robes 935 50 

Miscellaneous 200 00 

Carpenter Shop 300 00 

Blacksmith Shop 350 00 

Smallpox Hospital 500 00 



1,710 50 



At the Yard of the Department there are employed 

1 Foreman $3 50 per day 

1 Blacksmith 2 75 per day 

1 Carpenter 2 50 per day 

1 Fumigator 2 50 per day 

3 Hostlers and Watchmen 2 00 per day 

10 Ash Teamsters 2 00 per day 

10 Ash Helpers 1 80 per day 

7 Swill Teamsters 2 00 per day 

7 Swill Helpers 1 80 per day 

2 Paper Teamsters 2 00 per day 

2 Paper Helpers -,.... 1 80 per day 

2 Dump Men 1 80 per day 



The above force work, rain or shine, every day in the 
year excepting Christmas and the Fourth of July. In the col- 
lection of ashes, all the teams and men are sent into the old 
six wards which gives them one day each week to remove all 
the ashes in the city. 



Year 


Population 


Expenditures 


Revenue 


Net Cost 


City's 
Valuation 


Taxation 
Per Capita 


1894 


83,026 


157,073 73 


318 43 


56,755 30 


69,091,536 


.63 


1895 


84,359 


46,324 04 


570 80 


45,753 24 


68,885,732 


.54 


1896 


85,700 


45,587 11 


265 57 


45,321 54 


69,910,472 


.53 


1897 


87,000 


48,551 84 


2,369 99 


46,181 85 


70,389,280 


.53 


1898 


87,000 


41,026 78 


3,229 02 


37,779 76 


70,977,303 


.43 


1899 


90,114 


40,830 23 


3,796 05 


37,034 18 


71,255,587 


.41 


1900 


94,969 


246,266 11 


3,647 03 


42,619 08 


71,529,515 


.44 


1901 


94,969 


46,673 41 


4,585 26 


42,088 15 


71,674,588 


.44 


1902 


99,574 


354,815 33 


6,103 87 


48,711 46 


71,903,757 


.48 


1903 


101,959 


446,168 01 


4,085 12 


42,082 89 


72,004,028 


.41 


1904 


104,402 


546,451 97 


4,137 31 


42,314 66 


71,614,907 


.40 



1. Smallpox and Swill Cremation, 12,708 25 

2. Smallpox, $4,739 67 

3. Smallpox, 6,626 20 

4. Smallpox, 1,000 00 

5. Smallpox, 1,010 02 



BOARD OF HEALTH 61 

The Department have in use, Jan. 1, 1905, as dumping 
grounds for the Ash Collection : — 



& 



Land owned by Locks and Canals, Aiken St. 
Land owned by E. B. Peirce, Cambridge St. 
Land owned by Boyle Bros., Middlesex, cor Pawtucket St. 
Land owned by E. A. Smith, Waverly Ave. 
Land owned by Agricultural Society, Gorham St. 
Land owned by Viola Wilson, Leverett St. 
Land owned by Locks and Canals, Stackpole St. 
Land owned by Percy Parker Estate, Richardson St. 
Land owned by J. W. Bennett Estate, Tanner St. 
Land owned by J. P. Mahoney, State St. 
Land owned by Conners Bros., Plain St. 

Land owned by D. Gage Estate, Mammoth Road. 
Land owned by C. I. Hood, Andover St. 
Land owned by J. F. Holden, Westford St. 
Land owned by D. Gage Estate, Broadway, cor Paw- 
tucket St. 



The swill collections are made twice each week, every 
team having three different routes. While there is more swill 
in summer than in winter, the freezing of the buckets at 
houses makes it necessary to provide ice chisels to cut out the 
swill, thereby taking more time to cover the different routes. 
As cities grow in population, the collection and disposal of 
the municipal waste becomes a costly and serious problem. 
Lowell in 1891 put into use an Engle Cremator, costing eight 
thousand dollars ($8,000.00) for the purpose of burning the col- 
lections made by the Health Department teams, and for three 
years the experiment was maintained. It was found to be a 
very costly procedure, and it was gradually discontinued until 
for the last four years all the swill has been sold to farmers 
as food for swine. We have no evidence that it injures the 
quality of pork made and as the result of our experience, with 
particular reference to its cost, the present Board are not 
favorably inclined towards its cremation. But when the 



62 ANNUAL REPORT 

Cremator went into commission, personal notice was served 
upon every provision and fish dealer that the refuse made by 
them must be taken to the plant, and they were forbidden to 
deposit any upon the dumping grounds that are used by the 
department for ashes and rubbish. Since the plant has been 
unused for swill, it has always taken care of large quantities 
of very offensive material, as well as all the dead animals. 
After a presentation of the conditions to the Mayor and City 
Council of 1904, they provided by a loan Ten Thousand Dol- 
lars ($10,000.00) to be expended by the Board in 1905 for the 
purpose outlined above. 

Garbage when fresh is clean and has little or no odor. It 
is only when it has arrived at a good old age that it becomes 
offensive. From a sanitary standpoint, there is as much dan- 
ger lurking in dry refuse as there is in swill, on account of 
flying dust. There are many probabilities of infection in dry 
refuse from tenement houses, old paper, rags, clothing, shoes, 
mattresses and hospital waste, and great care is used to pre- 
vent the indiscriminate dumping of such stuff on vacant lots 
used for ash disposal. 

The Board hopes that during 1905, with the assistance 
given by a new Cremator, in a changed location nearer the 
geographical center of the city, the refuse can be destroyed 
at a less cost than at present and the Ash Dumps kept free 
from objectionable material. Before asking for sealed pro- 
posals, it is expected that some representative of the Board 
will examine thoroughly one or more of the plants in opera- 
tion, built by the different competitors. 

The list that seems to require personal investigation in- 
cludes the following manufacturers: 

Clinton Foundry Co., New York City. 
Decarie Mfg. Co., Minneapolis, Minn. 
The Dixon Garbage Co., Toledo, O. 
Jarvis Engineering Co., Boston, Mass. 

The Board hopes and expects to have a plant located and 
erected before the advent of warm weather in 1905. 



BOARD OF HEALTH 63 

An effort lias been made to compare the methods and 
cost of the collection and disposition of swill and garbage in 
the different Massachusetts cities, but the systems and con* 
trols are so varied as to render any comparison of little value 
The different departments which control, the difficulty in re 
ducing to a comparable factor the reports given in tons, cubic 
feet and cords, and the uncertainty as to what is meant by 
cost as to whether it includes maintenance of horses and 
wagons, or simply pay-roll of labor employed, prevented the 
preparation of any tabulated comparison, but herewith is ap- 
pended the results of the inquiry, which are valuable as far as 
they go, towards giving information upon a matter of import- 
ance to all citizens and tax-payers. 



1904. LOWELL. 

Population 101,402, estimate. Health Department col- 
lects both swill and ashes. 

Cost collecting ashes, labor pay roll. . . . $10,714 95 
Cost collecting swill, labor pay roll .... 8,324 70 
No income from ashes. 
From swill 5,555 25 



Net cost of swill $2,769 45 

4352 loads were collected and sold to farmers at Health 
Department Yard for transport to farms where it is used as 
food for swine. 



1903. WORCESTER. 

Population, 127,286. Expenditures of Health Depart- 
ment, no collection of ashes or swill, $30,401.98. The Pauper 
Department collects the swill and takes it to the City Farm 
where it is fed to swine, the City receiving the income from 
the sale of pork. Net cost of collection, $6,363.02. About 9,000 
tons swill. 

Householders are required to remove the ashes at houses 



64 ANNUAL REPORT 

to dumps provided by the Health Department at the house- 
holders' expense. 



1003. FALL RIVER. 

Population, 112,000. The Street Department collects 
ashes. Could not give the cost. The swill is collected by con- 
tract, price |12,000.00 per year. No income. 



1003. CAMBRIDGE. 

Population, 08,630. 

Ashes collected by Street Dept., cost. . . $28,707 78 

Swill collected by Health Dept. 

Cost ?24,169 50 

Income (fed to swine) 10,441 24 



Net cost $13,728 26 

1003. NEW BEDFORD. 

Population, 75,000. Does not collect ashes. Has awarded 
contract to a Utilization Company to collect and dispose of 
swill; pays the Company annually $23,000. 

1003. LYNN. 

Population, 72,500. Collects both ashes and swill, Ashes 
cost $16,664.00. Swill, $13,532.05. Income from swill 
$4,657.77. Total cost of department, $40,244.82. 

1003. LAWRENCE. 

Population, 70,000. Collects ashes and swill. Cost of 
ashes, $17,000. Cost of swill, $11,000. No income. Total cost 
of department, $41,040.03. 



BOARD OP" HEALTH 65 

1903. SPRINGFIELD. 

Population, 69,380. Collects both ashes and swill. Cost of 
ashes, $16,011.44. Cost of swill, $13,271.69. Taken out of city 
and fed to swine, with an income to the city of $1,335. 

1903. SOMERVILLE. 

Population, 67,000. Collects both ashes and swill. Cost 
of ashes, $13,761.75. Cost of swill, $11,982. Swill sold to con- 
tractor for $1,100. Total cost to department, $47,160.66. 

1903. BROCKTON. 

Population, 46,601. Health Department collects ashes. 
Pauper Department collects swill. Cost of collecting ashes, 
$6,500. Cost of collecting swill, $9,000. Income, sale of hogs, 
$6,500. Net cost of swill collection, $2,500. 

1903. HOLYOKE. 

Population, 50,000. Ashes and swill in charge of Board 
of Public Works. Cost of ashes, $19,000. Cost of swill, 
$2,200. No income. 

1903. SALEM. 

Population, 37,500. Health Department collects swill at 
a cost of $7,067 and receives from contractor $2,500. 

1903. CHELSEA. 

Population, 35,876. Health Department pays contractor 
on a three years' contract $3,000 annually for collection of 
swill. 



66 ANNUAL REPORT 

1903. HAVERHILL. 

Population, 38,600. Street Department collects ashes. 
Health Department collects swill by contract, cost $2,700 per 
year. Fed to swine at Newton, N. H. Taken from city on 
cars. No income. 



In conclusion, we wish to thank the Mayor and the City 
Council for their uniform courtesy during the past year and 
especially to express our lively appreciation for the appro- 
priation of ten thousand dollars ($10,000) for a new Cremator, 
in return for which we shall, on our part, spare no labor or 
time in giving the City the best Cremator within our power. 

WILLIAM B. JACKSON, M. D., 
LEONARD HUNTRESS, M. D., 
WILLIAM C. DOHERTY, 

Board of Health. 



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HHHrlHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHrlHHHHHH 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS 



OF THE 



OITY OF" LOWEL 



FOR THE YEAR 1904 




LOWELL, MASS. 
PRESS OF CHAS. E. ROBINSON 

1 905 



STREET DEPARTMENT. 



ORGANIZATION 1904 



Superintendent, 



LAFOREST BEALS. 



(from Jan. i, to May 24.) 



Acting Superintendent, . FREDERICK W. FARNHAM 

(from May 25, to Jan. 4, 1905.) 



Assistant Superintendent Streets, George W. Hartwell. 
" " Sewers, Ether S. Foss. 

(from Jan. 1, to April 20.) 

" " Daniel W. Bugbee, 

(from May 3, to Oct. 1.) 

" " Frank W. Lazelle, 

(appointed Oct. 3rd.) 



Department Clerk, 



CLARENCE H. RAYMOND. 



Book-keeper, 
Inspector of Sewers, 



FRANKLIN T. WILSON. 
SAMUEL D. BUTTERWORTH 



STREET COMMITTEE. 

Alderman Carmichael, 

" Fairweather. 

Councilman Barry, 

" Samuel Fleming, 

" James Fleming, 

Hayes. 
Palm 



SEWER COMMITTEE 

Alderman Gerow, 
" Grant, 

" Gallagher. 



CONTENTS, 



PAGES 

Appropriations 6 

Asphalt Pavement Repaired 51 

Bridges , 67-68 

Cleaning Streets 7-1 2 

Cleaning Streets, Recapitulation 30 

Cinder Sidewalks 38-39 

Concrete Crossings Repaired T 40 

Concrete Pavement Repaired 41 

Concrete Sidewalks Repaired 42-44 

Concrete Sidewalks Top Dressed 45~47 

Grading Streets 36-37 

Ledge 50 

Macadamized Streets 33 

New Brick Sidewalks 26 

New Stone Walls 26 

New Fences 28 

New Edgestones 31 52 

New Sidewalks 34 



CONTENTS.— Continued. 



PAGES 

New Granite Crossings , 35 

New Catch Basins 62-64 

Personal Property, Street Department 14-1 7 

Personal Property, Watering Streets 17 

Personal Property, Boulevard 18 

Personal Property, Sewer Department 19-21 

Personal Property, Recapitulation 21 

Paving Gutters 22 

Paving Aiken Street Bridge 27 

Permits Granted 51 

Repaving Gutters 23 

Repaving Streets 24 

Repairing Bridges 27 

Relaying Crossings 28 

Relaying Sidewalks 29 

Removing Snow 29 

Resolutions for Sidewalks 41 

Resetting Edgestones 49 

Sweeping Streets 13 

Streets Laid Out and Accepted 48 

Sundry Work 50 

Sewers Constructed 5 2-59 

Sewers Repaired 6o-6j 

Top Dressing Streets. . '. 25 

Table of Sewers 65-66 

Wood Block Paving 51 




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REPORT 



SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS' OFFICE, 
CITY HALL, 

Lowell, Mass., December 31, 1904. 

To the Honorable City Council: 

Gentlemen : — 

In compliance with City Ordinances, herewith, respectfully 
is submitted the annual report upon the several departments under 
the direction and control of the Superintendent of Streets. 

Laforest Beals, Supt. of Streets Jan. 1st, — May 24th, 1904. 
Frederick W. Farnham, Acting Supt. of Streets, by appointment. 
Hon. Charles E. Howe, Mayor, May 25th, 1904 — January 4, 1905. 



REPORT OF THE 



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^ 







SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS. 



CLEANING STREETS. 



NAME OF STREET. 

A 

Abbott 

Adams 

Agawam 

Aiken Ave 

Albion 

Alder 

Ames 

Andover 

Andrews 

Anne 

Arch 



Arlington. 

Ash 

Auburn.. 
Austin... 
Arthur. . . 
Ames 



B 

Baldwin 

Barclay 

Barrington 

Bartlett 

Bassett 

Beacon 

Beech 

Bellevue 

Bellmont 

Bellmont Ave. 
Belrose Ave.. 

Billings 

Blodgett 

Blossom 

Bourne 

Bowden 

Bowers 



COST. 

37 °3 

9 02 

29 79 
17 81 

33 33 
6 40 

12 S 3 

6 42 

148 81 

30 86 

31 69 

6 62 

7 83 
17 65 

6 84 

i5 63 

4-55 
2 07 

40 62 

8 24 
17 81 

4 78 

25 49 

4 42 

117 26 

36 68 

4 35 
35 63 

12 38 
8 24 

27 3 6 

10 75 
i7 58 

8 59 

13 23 

14 34 



NAME OF STREET. 

Boynton 

Branch 

Bridge 

Broadway 

Burgess 

Burns 

Burtt..... 

Butterfield 

Butler Ave 

Brooks 

Billings 

Boulevard 

Bertram 

Burnside 



C 

Cabot 

Cady 

Cambridge... 

Canton 

Carlisle _. 

Carlton 

Carter . . . 

Cedar 

Central 

Chambers 

Chapel 

Charles 

Cheever 

Chelmsford.. 

Chester 

Chestnut 

Church 

Claire 

Clarke 

Coburn 

Colonial Ave. 



COST. 

10 30 

1 5 32 
28 87 

57 88 

13 47 
2 27 

13 02 

12 63 

2 39 

5 99 
4 12 

1,050 21 

4 56 
9 06 

18 25 
22 25 

8 60 
37 02 
32 51 
24 01 

2 16 

2 39 
16 52 

34 9^ 
8 90 

19 81 

6 57 
13 92 

47 14 

11 40 

32 45 

12 26 
12 82 
12 42 
31 60 
15 20 



REPORT OF THE 



CLEANING STREETS— Continued. 



NAME OF STREET. 

Common 

Concord 

Congress 

Coolidge 

Coral 

Corbett 

Corner 



Cosgrove 

Court 

Crawford 

Crescent 

Cross 

Crowley 

Cumberland Road. 

Cushing 

Colburn 

Chase Ave 

Columbus Ave 

City Hall Ave 

Court Ave 



D 

Dalton 

Dartmouth. 

Davis 

Doane 

Dodge 

Dover 

Dummer. . . 

Dunfey 

Durant 



East Merrimack. 

East Pine 

Edson 

Eighteenth 

Eighth 

Eighth Ave 



COST. 

29 87 

49 30 
8 70 

3 78 
22 16 

4 43 
8 11 

17 70 

4 45 

4 77 

13 02 

37 °° 

1 3 °3 
8 46 

13 3 2 

11 95 

6 52 

12 37 
79 28 

4 46 
24 88 

64 15 
10 72 

2 40 
4 34 

7 3 2 
S3 87 

13 67 

3 49 
29 97 

56 01 

1 S 43 
13 57 
3 2 36 
12 15 
10 74 



NAME OF STREET. 

Eleventh 

Elliott 

Ellsworth 

Elm 

Emery 

Ennoll 

Everett 

Exeter 

Eaton 

Essex 



Fairmount. . . 

Fairview 

Favor 

Fay 

Fayette 

Fen wick 

Fifth 

Fifth Ave 

First 

Fletcher 

Floyd 

Ford 

Fort Hill Ave. 

Foster •. . 

Fourth Ave . . 

Franklin 

Fremont 

Fulton 

Fourth 

Fernald 

Farmland Rd. 

Garnet 

Gates 

Gershom Ave. 
Gibson , 



COST. 

45 47 

13 2 5 

3 43 
22 15 

10 96 

18 79 

5 76 

4 13 

6 62 

8 70 

75 34 

14 3 2 
6 61 

11 08 
26 60 

9 07 
43 21 
14 35 

3 2 57 
106 36 

12 77 
4i 83 
56 49 
85 9 2 
38 9° 

8 3 2 

49 5*» 

19 09 

28 6S 

2 06 



10 S 3 
28 89 
20 40 

6 85, 



SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS. 



CLEANING STREETS— Continued. 



NAME OF STREET. 

Gold 

Gorham , 

Grand 

Grove 

Glidden Ave , 

Gibson 

Georgia Ave , 

Grace 



Hale 

Hall 

Hampshire 

Hanks 

Hanover 

Harding 

Harrison 

Harvard 

Hastings 

Hawthorn 

High 

Highland '. 

Hildreth 

Holvrood Ave. 

Houghton 

Howard 

Howe 

Hudson 

Humphrey 

Huntington... 
Hutchinson.. . 

Hoyt Ave 

Hovey 

Highland Ave. 

Hovey Ave 

Hazeltine 



Inland. 



COST. 

i 92 

17 16 

39 43 

5 1 J 4 

16 70 

21 50 

4 56 
2 28 

7i 57 
11 70 

45 o7 

25 61 

11 32 

8 08 
10 76 

23 44 
32 69 

4 34 

80 37 

30 40 

107 26 

38 45 

9 13 
114 19 

8 26 

9 01 
28 44 
21 50 

6 84 
8 24 
8 46 
2 05 
4 12 
2 29 

26 28 



NAME OF STREET. 

Jackson 

James 

Jefferson 

Jenness 

Jewett 

John 

June 

July 

Keene 

Kinsman 

Kirk 

Kimball Ave 

Knapp Ave 



Lagrange 

Lane 

Laurel 

Lawrence 

Lawson 

Lee 

Leroy 

Leverett 

Lewis 

Liberty 

Lilley Ave 

Lincoln 

Linden 

Little 

Livermore 

Livingston 

Livingston Ave. 

Lombard 

London 

Loring 

Ludlam 

Lundberg 



COST. 

7 18 
13 67 

9 36 

13 03 
28 88 

19 65 

15 10 

1 98 

16 53 
21 88 

3 67 

4 46 

7 81 

12 81 

12 81 

20 85 
67 03 

5 49 

14 06 

10 76 

13 26 

8 41 
62 88 

35 59 
80 91 

8 47 

6 45 
12 79 

25 32 
16 07 

7 96 
52 37 
24 21 

47 46 

21 94 



IO 



REPORT OF THE 



CLEANING STREETS— Continued. 



NAME OF STREET. 

Lyon 

Lamb 

Little Canada 



Madison 

Main 

Mammoth 

Manchester 

Mansur 

Marginal 

Marion 

Market , 

Marlborough 

Marshall 

May 

Mead 

Meadowcroft 

Merrimack 

Methuen... 

Middlesex 

Midland 

Mill 

Moody 

Moore 

Mt. Grove 

Mt. Hope 

Mt. Vernon 

Mt. Washington. 

Myrtle 

Meadow Road . . 

Manahan 

Merrill 



New Moody 

Nesmith 

Newell 

Newhall 



COST. 

25 3 1 

59 °7 

4 35 
18 03 

102 42 

15 5i 

29 07 

24 73 
6 35 

55 01 

37 30 

30 81 

10 85 

5 60 
8 25 

20 34 
63 16 

232 84 

29 97 

2 86 

160 63 

60 38 
8 03 

35 16 

38 15 

21 89 

45 3 1 

J 9 55 
10 83 

2 38 

42 12 

107 27 

10 76 

20 08 



NAME OF STREET. 

Nichols 

Nicolet 

Nineteenth 

Ninth 

North 

Norcross 

North Common 



Oak 

Oakland.. 

Olive 

Osgood... 

Otis 

Oliver 

O'Connell. 



Pawtucket 

Paige 

Park 

Parker 

Pearl 

Perry 

Phillips 

Pine 

Plain 

Pond 

Porter 

Powell 

Princeton 

Prospect 

Puffer 

Parkview Ave 

Pay ton 

Pollard 

Picking up Papers. 

Queen 



COST. 

17 71 
10 86 
24 09 

3 9° 
14 17 

53 42 

37 13 

20 73 
40 63 

1 04 
10 73 

6 85 

5 9i 

4 24 

185 74 
23 92 

21 06 
47 02 
10 88 
42 23 

3 89 

132 18 

61 25 

.8 15 

18 99 

65 01 

61 78 

8 91 

2 05 

38 22 

4 56 
2 38 

421 93 

23 88 



SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS. 



II 



CLEANING STREETS.— Continued. 



NAME OF STREET. 

Railroad 

Ralph 

Read 

Riverside 

Robbins 

Rock 

Rogers 

Rolfe 

Royal 

Race 

Roberts 

Robinson 

Richards 

Richmond 

Ross Ave 



Salem 

Sa rgent 

Sayles 

Schaffer 

School 

Second 

Second Ave . . 

Seventh 

Seventh Ave. 

Shaw 

Sheldon 

Sherman 

Simpson 

Sixth 

Sixth Ave 

Smith 

South 

So. Canton.. 
So. Highland 
So. Loring. . . 
So. Whipple . 



COST. 

12 80 
2 27 

35 78 

59 5 2 

35 65 

42 89 

151 98 

8 03 

26 81 

14 84 

12 61 
4 35 

29 75 

1 04 

2 17 

61 70 
H 45 

!° 75 

8 03 

179 17 

17 89 

15 43 

16 28 

17 49 

50 82 

13 38 
29 97 

6 41 

53 59 

27 29 

100 70 

52 9 T 

10 72 

8 90 

20 31 

21 95 



NAME OF STREET. 

Spalding 

Stackpole 

Stevens 

Suffolk 

Summer 

Swift 

Sutherland 

Stanley 

State 

Sidney 

Somerset 

Smith Ave 

Stedman 

Starbird 

St. James 

Sanders Ave 

Standish 

So. Common 

Saratoga 



Talbot 

Tanner 

Tenth.. 

Third 

Third Ave.. 
Thirteenth . . 
Thorndike . . 

Tilden 

Tucker 

Twelfth 

Tyler 

Tremont 

Tolman Ave 
Tyler Park.. 
Totman 



Union. 



COST. 

7 49 

44 43 

215 48 

16 24 

50 77 

2 38 

18 88 

i4 97 
10 97 

10 95 

3 20 

4 34 

17 16 

25 2T 

5 12 

4 57 
4 34 

37 13 

11 19 

14 5 6 
21 71 

42 15 
119 90 

J 9 53 

21 51 

126 08 

22 52 
10 79 

i7 35 

33 o7 
20 15 

6 05 
109 16 

2 40 

26 20 



12 



REPORT OF THE 



CLEANING STEETS.— Continued. 



NAME OF STREET. 

Varney 

Varnum 

Varnum Ave 

Vernon 

Victoria 



Watchusett 

White 

Walker 

Walnut 

Wamesit 

Wannalancit 

Ware . 

Warwick 

Washington 

Watson 

West (Centralville) 
West (Ayer's City). 

West nth 

West 5th... 

West 4th 

West 9th 

West 6th 

West 3rd 



COST. 

10 94 

25 18 

134 18 

21 49 

2 06 

15 3 2 

27 39 
118 69 

J 5 33 

16 74 

13 5 2 
6 72 

27 60 

20 10 
8 79 

!9 33 
4 34 
4 02 
8 58 

10 64 

4 13 
61 02 

21 28 



NAME OF STREET. 

Western Ave 

Westford 

Whipple 

Worthen 

Willard 

Willow 

Wyman 

Ward... 

Whitney Ave 

West Bowers 

Willie 

Wentworth Ave 

Willie Ave 

Woodward Ave 

Wilder 

West Adams 

Winter 

Windsor 

Winthrop Ave 

Waverly Ave 

Wright 

Walden 



COST. 

33 x 9 
184 21 

21 87 

63 i7 

18 47 

25 i5 

4i 93 

13 59 
17 89 

3 97 
21 24 

74 69 

16 77 

4 78 
166 57 

12 37 

15 64 
11 41 

4 57 
10 31 

2 37 
4 5 6 



Total Cost $12,202 66 



SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS. 



13 



SWEEPING STREETS. 



NAME OF STREET. 

Adams 

Andover 

Anne. 

Appleton 

Arch 

Branch 

Bridge 

Broadway 



Cabot 

Central 

Chelmsford . 

Church 

Concord . . . 

Crosby 

Charles 



Dutton. . . 
Davidson 



E. Merrimack. 

Fayette 

First 

Fletcher 



George . . 
Gorham . 
Green . . . 



Hale... 
Howard . 
Hurd... 



Jackson. 



COST. 

167 61 

47 81 

28 60 

148 24 

J 3 5 1 

117 91 

229 21 
13 22 

71 21 

42 72 

414 20 

95 53 
38 37 
62 39 

4 97 

256 14 

58 35 

182 05 

66 08 

73 34 

159 48 

24 94 

347 58 
26 03 

82 79 
68 49 

30 13 
131 20 



NAME OF STREET. 



Kirk 

Lakeview . 
Lawrence . 
Lee 



Mammoth Road 

Market 

Merrimack 

Middlesex 

Moody 

Mt. Vernon 

Middle 



New Moody. 

Pawtucket . . 
Pleasant .... 
Palmer 



Salem. . . 
School... 
Shattuck. 
Suffolk.. 



Thorndike. 



Walker 

Warren 

Western Ave. 

Westford 

Worthen 

Williams 



COST. 


! 2 


20 


442 


99 


344 


20 


2 


20 


89 


40 


33 1 


10 


208 


29 


59 


28 


28 


09 


59 


55 


11 


04 



41 63 



222 


93 


16 


25 


4 


30 


87 56 


x 43 


42 


4 


32 


4 


40 


192 


27 


95 


06 


12 


76 


157 


^3 


I 3 


23 


106 


90 


32 


13 



Total Cost $5,7i5 43 



14 



REPORT OF THE 

PERSONAL PROPERTY. 



December 3 1 



Schedule of Personal 
1904. 

2 Machine Augers 

4 Adzes 

57 Blankets 

51 Street Blankets 

1 Bridge Auger 

69 Curry Combs 

50 Horse Brushes 

3 Clocks 

4 Coal Hods 

1 Pair Climbing Spurs 

4 Coal Stoves 

41 Old Collars 

4 Hand Rollers 

4 Sets Dump Cart Har- 
nesses 

1 13 Lanterns 

9 Single Sleds 

26 Double Sleds 

3 Derricks 

23 Drilling Spoons 

150 Feet Birch Boards 

35 Sets Double Harnesses 

4 Driving Sleighs 

6 Buggies and Wagons. . . 

9 Driving Harnesses 

23 Double Carts 

2 Double Jiggers 

1 Double Stone Wagon... 

2 Lumber Wagons 

1 Single Lumber Wagon.. 

12 Single Dump Carts 

4 2-wheel Dump Carts. . . 

2 Single Jiggers 

2 Fire Pails 

43 Feed Baskets 



Property belonging to the Street Department 



* I 


00 


4 


00 


114 


00 


102 


00 




5o 


17 


25 


75 


00 


3 


00 


2 


00 


1 


25 


13 


00 


57 


40 


20 


00 


80 


00 


113 


00 


300 


00 


1,500 


00 


150 


00 


5 


06 


8 


00 


875 


00 


200 


00 


800 


00 


164 


00 


2,300 


00 


200 


00 


25 


00 


300 


00 


15 


00 


1,300 


00 


200 


00 


150 


00 


8 


5o 



33 °° 



250 Feet Fire Hose 

5 Feed Boxes 

167 Grade Stakes 

2,3 Tons Hay 

41 Draught Horses 

7 Driving Horses 

200 Loads Sand 

700 Bushels Oats 

35 Mane Brushes 

1 Set Dies and Plates 

2 Tons Straw 

3 Stone Drag 

52 Street Signs 

3 Horse Covers 

53 Halters 

2 Hay Cutters 

614 Snow Shovels 

10 Stone Forks 

ti Sets Sighting Sticks 

4 Iron Squares 

1 2 Hay Forks 

1 Hand Cart 

10 Brooms for Sweeper. . . 
16 Snow Plows 

5 Tape Measures 

3 Sparrow Wagons 

7 Sparrow Carts 

3 2-horse Street Sweepers. 

800 Lbs. Rock Salt 

300 Lbs. Horse Food 

90 Bushels Corn 

1 Engine, Boiler, Stone 

Crusher and Building at 

ledge 

40 Feet Corner Stone 



$75 00 
25 00 

2 50 
660 00 

8,200 00 

1 ,000 00 

300 00 

350 00 

15 00 

75 °° 
50 00 

15 00 

52 00 
9 00 

53 °° 
15 00 

307 00 

5 00 

5 °° 

3 °° 

6 00 

15 00 
91 00 

160 00 

5 °o 

75 00 

20 00 

300 00 

16 00 
4-5o 

54 00 



2,500 00 
27 50 



SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS. 



15 



8000 Feet Spruce Lumber 
500 Feet Spruce Matched 

Boards. . . 

215 Feet } inch Rubber 

Hose 

153 Feet I inch Rope 

100 Feet J inch Rope 

14 Gallons Harness Oil... 

3 Steam Road Rollers 

1 2-Horse Dirt Scraper. . . 

5 Tons Coal 

.1 Steam Heating Boiler... 

8000 Feet Oak Plank 

195 Pick Handles 

39 Stone Chains 

17 Striking Hammers 

1 Blacksmith Shop and 

Tools at Ledge 

3 Steam Drills 

3000 Exploders 

38 Iron Pails 

92 Square Pointed Shovels 

120 Feet Drill Steel 

61 Iron Rakes 

8 Paving Mauls 

26 Stone Hammers 

13 Frost Hammers 

30 Stone Wedges 

18 Tin Dippers 

54 Crow Bars 

22 Kegs Wire Spikes 

5 Trowels 

284 Picks 

18 Axes 

5 Kegs Wire Nails 

14 Tool Boxes 

6 Claw Hammers 

147 Hand Drills 

120 Stone Points 



^160 00 
10 00 

20 00 

1 25 

1 00 

7 00 

,000 00 

20 00 

35 00 
570 00 
458 00 

19 00 

39 °° 
34 00 



75 
500 

90 

24 

41 

50 
24 

10 

52 
26 

6 

1 
54 
5i 

3 
275 

9 

1 3 
140 

29 

IK 



00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 

40 

00 
00 
00 

60 
80 

00 

70 

00 
00 
00 

50 

00 
00 

40 

00 



13 Hand Saws 

42 Boxes Dynamite 

180 Push Brooms 

12 Water Pails 

1 1 5-Gallon Oil Cans 

9 2-Gallon Oil Cans 

3 Derrick Chains 

7 Spreaders and Chains.. - 
1 Manure Fork 

6 Gallons Blue Paint 

1 Set Light Double Har- 
ness 

I Pair Rubber Boots 

125 Hoes 

20 Frost Wedges 

23 Wheelbarrows 

8 Long Handle Shovels... 

4 Batteries and Wires 

9 Spirit Levels 

4 Cross Cut Saws 

I I Tamping Bars 

1 Portable Crusher 

1 Heavy Set Falls and 
Rope 

2 Pair Pipe Tongs 

5 Ladders 

13 Heavy Single Harnesses 
318 Round Pointed Shovels 

7 Tackle Blocks 

1 Set Tackle Blocks and 

Rope 

I Georgia Pine Bridge 
Timber 

II Dozen Lantern Globes 
18 Corn Brooms 

1 Road Cutter Machine . . 

2 Hard Pan Road Plows. 

2 Plows 

1 Single Express Wagon . . 



3> 5 


50 


630 


00 


124 


20 


4 


80 


5 


00 


2 


00 


3 


00 


14 


00 


v 


50 


6 


00 


5o 


00 


3 


25 


66 


25 


15 


00 


23 


00 


10 


50 


70 


00 


4 


50 


14 


00 


11 


00 


1,500 


00 


9 


00 


3 


00 


25 


00 


260 


00 


159 


00 


7 


00 



3 °° 

10 00 

11 00 
2 25 

125 00 
20 00 
10 00 
50 oc 



i6 

1 1 Stone Hand Sets 

4 Plush Robes 

2 Cant Hooks 

1 200 Pounds Shorts 

8 Bags Salt 

133 Hammer Handles 

1800 Tons Crushed Stone 

36 Hand Pans 

28 Push Pans 

7 Screens 

1 Pung 

9 Cans Albany Grease 

2 Sod Cutters 

2 Boxes Green Mountain 

Salve 

4 Wheel Jacks 

13 Cart Spreaders 

2 Pair Cart Shafts 

5 Gallons Turpentine 

2 Claw Bars 

126 Feet Pine Boards 

Old Flagging 

no Gallons Kerosene. ... . 

51 pounds Soap 

30 Sponges 

1 Kerosene Tank." 

1 Grind Stone 

6 Buffalo Robes 

6 Ice Picks 

6 Muzzles 

3 Axe Handles 

4 Small Oil Cans 

55 Gallons Cylinder Oil. . 
35 Barrels Machine Oil.. 

4 Monkey Wrenches 

45 Long Handled Snow 

Shovels 

6 Drill Pumps 

7 Forks 



REPOKT OF THE 

$ 5 50 i Chain Fall Set $ 7 00 

4 00 751 Feet 1 j inch Iron Pipe 10 00 
1 00 9 Plow Points 75 

1 2 00 Set Runners for Express 

8 00 Wagon 10 00 

13 00 4 Pinch Bars 4 00 

1,800 00 20 Feet Stone Flagging... 10 00 

27 00 26 Drag Planks 2600 

56 00 25 Feet White Wood 

30 00 Sheathing 4 50 

1 5 °° I 5 I Feet Edgestones 60 40 

18 00 10 Wheelbarrow Trays 7 50 

1 00 4 Gallons Harness Dressing 5 00 

2 Stilsom Wrenches 3 5° 

1 2 00 6 Drill Hose 60 00 

16 00 150 Sets Shims and Wedges 5 00 
6 50 1 Dozen Paint Brushes... 3 50 

16 00 2 Gallons Axle Oil 45 

6 00 1 Blacksmith's Shop and. . 

1 00 Tools 500 00 

3 00 1500 Paving Blocks 105 00 

100 00 1 Vise 10 00 

1 1 00 1 New Cart Body 25 00 

12 75 400 Feet Hemlock Plank. 20 00 

14 00 4 2-bushel Baskets 2 00 

45 00 6 Peen Hammers 9 00 

5 oc 1 Hand Axe 75 

100 00 29 Garbage Barrels 145 00 

3 00 2 Cans Polish 2 50 

6 00 6 Cans Reed's Polish 24 00 

30 1 Carpenter Shop 100 00 

1 00 '130 Sparrow Brooms 42 90 

16 00 5 Sets Springs for Steam 

17 00 Roller 23 50 

4 00 10 Bushings 35 00 

12 Packages Gold Dust... 3 00 

25 00 1 Set Wire Stretchers 1 50 

6 00 Horse Medicine 40 00 

3 50 10 Iron Bars 15 00 



SUPERINTENDENT" OF STREETS. 



17 



J Barrel Axle Grease $24 00 

3 Dozen Tuttle's Elixir... 12 00 

3 Tons Coal 18 00 

14 Axes 12 00 

3 Dozen Bells and Straps 23 00 

4 Lifting Hooks 6 00 

50 Pounds Copper Waste. 1 00 

8 Whips 14 00 

1 Set Front Wheels 50 00 

2 Brick Hammers 1 60 

6 Paving Hammers 4 00 

8 Wooden Mauls 800 

Harness Shop and Stock.. 50 00 

Office Fixtures 150 00 

1 2 Whiffletrees and Chains 6 00 

1 Vise 8 00 

1 Set Platform Scales 300 00 

3 Steam Roller Grates 15 00 

100 Feet i-inch Rope 3 00 

5 Sets Steam Drill 'Steel. . 250 00 

PERSONAL 

Schedule of Personal Property 

Department, December 31, 1904. 

22 Horses $ 2,200 00 

12 Sets Double Harnesses 325 00 

22 Halters 17 00 

24 Collars 50 00 

13 Sprinkling Carts I ?95° °° 

1 Monkey Wrench 75 

2 Neck Yokes 2 00 

5 Double Carts 500 00 

24 Feed Baskets 10 00 

2 Pair Tongs 4 00 

2 Step Ladders 5 00 

36 Horse Brushes 18 00 

1 1 Curry Combs 2 00 

1 Large Stillson Wrench.. 1 00 

10 Pails 2 50 



2 Manure Wheelbarrows.. $10 00 

1 Old Kerosene Tank 5 00 

10 Wooden Pails 5 00 

30 Grub Axes.* 45 00 

3 Steam Roller Tool Boxes 

and Tools 30 00 

18 Hand Hammers jo 80 

45 Gallons Axle Oil 5 00 

18 Bound Stones 23 76 

8 Chestnut Posts 2 40 

2 New Boats 50 00 

300 Feet Michigan Pine.. 21 00 

300 Feet Georgia Pine... 9 00 

3 Rolls Barbed Wire 6 00 

2 Forges 5 00 

1 Steam Roller Box and 

Castings 100 00 

265 Barn Brooms 13 25 



.2,797 97 



PROPERTY. 

belonging to the Street Watering 



4 00 
8 00 



1 Feed Truck 

8 Shut-off Wrenches 

I 4-quart Measure 50 

44 Blankets 140 00 

II Sponges 5 50 

11 Pounds Soap 2 75 

1 Hydrant Valve 16 00 

6 2-inch Valves 24 00 

6 Lengths Iron Pipe 9 00 

3 Wagon Jacks 15 00 

4 Street Car Hydrants 260 00 

17 Street Car Hydrants 

Complete 1,870 00 



,442 00 



i8 



REPORT OF THE 



PERSONAL PROPERTY. 



Schedule of Personal Property belonging to the Boulevard, 



December 31, 1904. 

1 Sprinkling Cart $225 00 

23 Grass Signs 2 50 

6 Stone Forks 3 00 

6 Iron Rakes 2 50 

9 Hoes 4 50 

8 Lawn Mowers 15 20 

8 Scythe Snaths 

4 Sickles 

2 Sod Cutters 

1 Sand Screen 

1 Spirit Level 

1 Pair Edging Shears 

1 Grind Stone 

1 Storehouse 250 00 

3 Wheelbarrows 3 75 

2 Wooden Mallets 1 00 

2 Hand Sprinklers 2 00 

1 Wooden Maul 50 



00 
00 

25 
00 

50 
5o 
00 



2 Tree Trimmers $ 2 00 

12 Wooden Rakes 5 00 

4 Sparrow Brooms 1 00 

1 Pick 60 

7 Round Pointed Shovels. 7 00 

6 Square Pointed Shovels. 3 60 

2 Lanterns 1 00 

3 Sighting Sticks 50 

1 Windmill 2,500 00 

1 Hand Saw 75 

1 Hammer 50 

2 Axes 1 50 

10 Scythes 10 00 

4 Hay Forks 3 00 

3 Ladders 15 00 



$3,078 65 



SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS. 

PERSONAL PROPERTY. 



19 



Schedule of Personal Property belonging to the Sewer Department, 



December 31, 1904. 




40 Parts of Old Grates... 


$ 52 00 


20 Crow Bars 


20 00 


10 Crabs for Shear Poles . 


250 00 


281 Feet Drain Pipe 


34 7 2 


Water Barrels 


Q OO 


7 Mortar Beds 


7 00 
15 00 
60 00 


3 Sand Screens 


212 Catch Basin Steps 


18 Square Feet Packing.. 


3 °° 


1 Pipers Dye and Stock . . 


18 00 


6 Tool Boxes for Boilers.. 


24 00 


2 Pairs Tongs 


4 00 


12 Hydrant Wrenches 


12 00 


14 Jack Bars 


4 00 


1 Paving Maul 


3 00 


3 Portable Forges 


200 00 


16 Tool Boxes 


160 00 


2 Sewer Wheelbarrows 


2 00 


2 Dutchmen for Hydrants 


25 00 


< j Wooden Rolls .... 


2 25 

LOO OO 


5 Houses for Engines 


6 Batteries and Wires. . . . 


I20 OO 


9 Steam Drills and Tools. 


2,000 OO 


7 Mason's Trowels 


7 00 


400 Feet Drill Steel 


112 OO 


9 Caulking Tools 


4 20 


4 Hand Drill Hammers... 


2 OO 


6 Tape Lines 


8 00 


5 Pounds Shims and 




Wedges 


3 5o 


42 Striking Hammers 


84 00 


19 Stone Hammers 


3^ °° 


4 Frost Hammers 


12 00 


2 Fiddle Blocks 


11 00 


100 Pick Handles..*. 


10 00 



13 Sheave Blocks $ 1 

12 Catch Basin Dippers.. 3 

12 Sheathing Caps 28 

10 Iron Mauls 10 

18 Wooden Mauls 18 

12 Sets Shear Poles 120 

1 Pair Pipe Shear Poles . . 50 
1 Trainer Transmitter 

Sewer Machine 2,000 

1 7 Jack Screws 34 

7 Kegs 30 Penny Nails... 11 

102 Lanterns 51 

10 Pairs Long Rubber 

Boots \ 70 

12 Iron Pails 

550 Feet J inch Rubber 

Hose 

1 Set Branding Irons. .... 

19 Hoes 9 

6 Post Hole Scoops 12 

215 Round Point Shovels. 146 

190 Square Point Shovels. 150 

2150 Feet Old Rope 60 

3000 Feet Sewer Lumber. 450 

7 Marine Pumps 84 

1 20 Feet Large Pump Hose 1 50 

1 60- Gallon Oil Can 7 

3 Steam Drill Pumps 3 

20 Drilling Spoons 10 

8 Hand Saws 8 

10 Barrels Hoffman 

Cement 13 

53 Barrels Portland 

Cement 92 

3 Adzes 11 



12 

35 
2 



30 
00 

00 

00 

00 

00 

00 

00 
00 

55 
00 

00 
00 

00 

00 

50 
00 

00 

00 

00 

00 

00 

00 

50 
00 

5o 
00 

00 

85 

2 5 



20 

6 Axes 

5 Hatchets 

22 Packages Carriage 
Bolts 

5 Spirit Levels 

i Steel Square 

12 Measuring Sticks 

6 Gallons Blue Paint 

4 Claw Hammers 

21 Padlocks 

25 Feet Steam Drill Pack- 
ing ♦- 

1 Box Repairs for Marine 
Pumps 

3 Strainers for Marine 
Pumps 

6 Monkey Engines 

3 Lidgewood Engines 

1 Hoadley Engine 

1 Webb- Watson Engine... 

6 Sets of Engineer's Boxes 

1 Upright Boiler 

2 Derricks 

3 Submerged Pumps 

2 Pile Drivers 

3 Driving Horses 

4 Draught Horses 

1 Concord Wagon 

1 Light Sleigh 

1 Single Truck 

4 Single Sleds 

5 i-Horse Dump Carts... 
1 Double Truck 

7 Stable Blankets 

7 Street Blankets 

4 Grub Axes 

370 Picks 

14 Large Chains 

5 Steam Drill Tool Boxes 



REPORT OF THE 

$ 6 00 12 Spanner Wrenches. .. . $ 8 50 

5 00 1 Large Hose Nozzle 12 00 

1 Set Tap and Dies 15 00 

22 00 21 Sling Chains 10 50 

6 90 7 Sets Tackles and Falls.. 35 00 

1 00 200 Gallons Kerosene.... 24 00 

1 2 00 3 Neck Yokes • 6 00 

1 2 00 107 Wooden Pails 9 63 

2 00 4 Frost Wedges 400 

21 co 3 Pipe Vises 45 00 

25 Hand Drills 6 00 

3 00 2 Row Boats 30 00 

7 Sheathing Pulleys 21 00 

2 5 00 6 Iron Tampers 3 60 

12 Scoop Handles 2 64 

3 25 7 Cross Cut Saws 14 00 

3 75 24 Iron Wheelbarrows 72 00 

2,700 00 500 Feet Canada Matched 

350 00 Boards 16 00 

500 00 300 Feet Spruce Matched 

24 00 Boards 5 25 

250 00 2 Roll Canvass 100 00 

500 00 4 Manhole Covers 39 98 

400 00 4 Track Grates 32 00 

150 00 1 Length Iron Pipe 24 00 

. 300 00 5 Single Harnesses 100 00 

800 00 2 Light Harnesses 40 00 

225 00 1 Express Wagon 125 00 

55 00 25,000 Brick 327 50 

50 00 7 Halters 7 00 

200 00 2 Tons Coal 15 00 

400 00 1 Stove 5 00 

300 00 1 Work Bench 5 00 

22 00 1 Box Rollers 2 50 

22 00 2 Tool Boxes for Boilers.. 8 00 

2 50 5 Rolls Tar Paper 5 00 

277 50 1 Paving Hammer 1 50 

54 00 2 Small Tool Houses 40 00 

20 00 6 Sets Wires for Batteries. 12 00 




m 
U 

o 

M 

O 

% 

> 

< 

Q 
< 

w 

PL, 

< 
Ph 

H 

O 
55 



O 

X 
w 

H 

P< 
O 
Jz; 

O 

t— i 

O 

o 

1-1 

z 

< 

a 

H 
P< 
O 

o 

R 

i— i 

PQ 

h 

w 
w 

H 

IT. 

w 



SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS. 



21 



25 Stone Cutter's Points.. $10 00 

1 Set Blacksmith's Tools. 10 00 

4 Anvils 21 00 

12 Oil Cloth Suits 27 60 

40 Feet 2\ inch Hose 25 00 

6 Oil Cans 525 

1 Paint Brush 25 

4 Sets Engineer's Tools... 18 00 
1 Tool House and Fixtures 3,000 00 

1 Table 8 00 

1 2-Wheel Dump Cart. ... 40 00 

2- Boxes Steam Fittings... 15 00 

1 Bolt Cutter 8 00 

1 Sprinkling Can 75 

25 Feet Plug Steel 375 

1 Vise ; 10 00 

4 Water Tubs 2 00 

2 Hand Drills 16 00 

6 Pairs Short Boots 18 00 

39 Grates 513 00 

89 Lantern Globes , . . 625 

4 Edgestone Castings 8 00 

6 Long Handle Shovels... 4 00 

1 Scythe Snath 2 00 

600 Feet Wrought Iron 

Pipe 75 00 



50 Loads Sand 
3 Ejectors 



1 Pile Driver 

1 Oil Tank 

125 Feet Steam Drill Hose 

1 Force Pump 

1 Stillson Wrench 

1 Sewer Cleaning Machine 

•5 Manhole Castings 

1 Magazine 

1 Box Steam Drill Fixtures 
6 Boxes Packing 

2 Dynamite Heaters 

6 Diaphrams for Pumps. - 

15 Bags Salt 

30 Boxes Exploders 

600 Feet 2 J inch Hydrant 

Hose 

2 Manhole Castings 

5 Claw Bars 

» 

5 Plank Cutters 

4 Water Proof Covers. . . . 



vt>75 00 
35 °° 
75 °° 
45 °° 
^7 50 

17 00 
2 50 

750 00 
67 50 

375 °° 
300 00 

18 50 

5 °° 

5 °° 
15 00 

157 00 

360 00 

3° °° 

5 °° 

5 °° 
12 00 



>22,3i3 47 



PERSONAL PROPERTY RECAPITULATION. 



Street Department $42,797 97 

Street Watering 7,442 00 

Boulevard 3>°78 65 

Sewer Department 22,313 47 



$75,632 09 



22 



REPORT OF THE 

PAVING GUTTERS 



STREET. 



COST. 



LENGTH 
IN FEET. 



Bartlett $39 38 

Bowers 60 50 

Beech 14 38 

Crowley 12 20 

Chestnut. 14 38 

Elliott 36 31 

Eaton 6 66 

Fort Hill Ave 46 09 

Grove 98 21 

Howard 159 95 

High 25 00 

Hastings. - 115 72 

Ina 36 80 

Lincoln 135 61 

Loring 3 88 

Livingston 87 69 

Liberty 34 00 

Myrtle ! 3 32 

Meadowcroft 65 27 

Moore 21 66 

Otis 33 70 

Pine 88 96 

Plain 10 00 

Plymouth 66 87 

Powell 14 06 

Stevens 197 32 

Sidney 14 50 

Sixth 13 60 

South Whipple 2 25 

School 132 54 

Sherman 46 00 

Shaw 481 

Westford ! 95 25 



$33 2 
520 

88 

5i 
280 

260 

5o 

565 

735 
1172 

150 
1021 

300 

1140 

30 
54o 
201 

15 

790 

480 
260 

535 

7i 

288 

75 

95i 
267 

100 

12 

1410 

260 

54 

635 



$1,736 87! 13,638 



SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS. 

REPAYING GUTTERS. 



2 3 



Chestnut 

Dover 

Durant 

Fourth 

Foster 

High 

John 

Loring 

Marshall 

Marlborough 

Moore 

Sixth 

Tenth 

Third 

West Third.. 



STREET. 




OI 



LENGTH 
IN FEET. 



$509 85 



280 

97 

20 

560 
100 
125 
138 
34o 
7 1 

2 35 
400 

1220 

no 

1400 

10 

5,106 



24 



REPORT OF THE 

REPAYING STREETS. 



STREET. 



Bridge 

Branch 

Chelmsford 

Central 

East Merrimack. 

Fletcher 

Gorham 

Howard 

Lake view Ave. . . 

Merrimack 

Middlesex 

Market 

Prescott 

Tanner 



$3,006 47 



COST. 


AREA IN 






YARDS. 


$109 


70 


427 


8 


28 


20 


76 


37 


198 


45 2 


96 


I ? 329 


99 


75 


43 6 


J 95 


16 


484 


814 


57 


2,419 


39 


25 


112 


26 


50 


95 


127 


3 1 


520 


166 


38 


349 


237 


63 


692 


308 


99 


898 


343 


62 


444 



8,42; 



SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS. 



in 

H 

W 

w 

H 



C/3 

W 
P 

o 



£ . 






AREA I 
YARDS 


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26 



REPORT OF THE 

NEW BRICK SIDEWALKS. 



STREET. 



LABOR. 



STOCK. 



AREA IX 
YARDS. 



Concord . . . 
Merrimack 

Market 

Middlesex. 
Worthen... 



Iio7 74 

JI 9 43 

83 70 

92 44 
91 40 



>i54 46 
205 60 
121 91 

J 95 2 7 
168 41 



299 

398 
236 

378 
^26 



$494 7i 



$845 65 



1*637 



NEW STONE WALLS. 



LOCATION. 




LINEAR 
FEET. 



Chelmsford 

Marshall 

Mammoth Road . 

Maple 

Powder Magazine 
Poor Farm 



$13 28 

454 37 
426 32 
512 00 
309 27 
42 48 



54 

47 
230 

288 

100 

217 




936 



SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS. 

REPAIRING BRIDGES. 



STREET. 



i 

Aiken 

Bridge 

Bridge 

Cabot 

Congress 

Lundberg 

Market 

Lawrence 

Mood}" 

Market 

Newhall 

Pawtucket 

School 



COST 



$142 12 

5 9i 

3 5o 

1 75 

!0 59 

32 75 

60 64 

406 88 

7 88 

5 63 

' 75 
11 25 

95 55 



$786 20 



PAVING AIKEN STREET BRIDGE 




STOCK. 



Labor per pay rolls 

Filing Saws 

Pitching and Tarring 

Waterproof Covering 

Spikes 

Castings 

Pitch 

Insurance 

Lunch 

Paving Blocks 

Lumber 

Total Cost $12,115 26 




* 13 


00 


369 


92 


920 


00 


137 


60 


61 


17 


41 


28 


175 


21 


9 


40 


5,569 


20 


1,898 


40 



,195 18 



28 



KEPORT OF THE 



BUILDING FENCES. 





STREET. 


COST. 


By - . . 


. $125 4i 

48 13 

237 45 

21 26 


Bridge 




Chelmsford 


Lincoln 


Mammoth Road 


27 86 

20 38 

101 63 

$582 12 


Nesmith 


Truant School 





RELAYING CROSSINGS. 



STREETS. 



LOCATION. 



Anne |At 

Cabot 

Cabot '. 

Central 

Central 

Gorham .... 

Market 

Middlesex... 

Moore 

South 

Tyler 

Tyler 

Willie 

Westford . . . 

Worthen 

Wilder 

Worthen 



French St 

Hall St 

Cheever St 

Middlesex St.... 
B. & M. Station 

Central St 

Lewis St 

Central St 

Sidney St 

Summer St 

No. 61 

George St 

Broadway 

Foster 

No. 335 

Broadway 

Broadwav 







LENGTH 


COST. 








IN FEET. 


$IO 


87 


40 


22 


13 


80 


IO 


76 


50 


38 


81 


170 


45 


37 


237 


i7 


25 


76 


11 


25 


48 


37 


07 


168 


25 


25 


80 


22 


57 


25 


17 


29 


64 


18 


77 


68 


19 


72 


72 


18 


57 


70 


21 


63 


72 


11 


63 


68 


T 5 


5o 


63 



$364 44 



M5 1 



SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS. 



2 9 



RELAYING SIDEWALKS. 
1 



STREET. 




$ 34 10 

139 62 

75 



1 
11 

5 
5 



Alder 

Bartlett 

Broadway 

Central 

Centre 

Cabot 

East Merrimack 

John 

Fayette 

High 

Hurd 

Lee 

Middlesex | 107 61 

Merrimack 

Moody 

Market 

Mvrtle 

Suffolk 

South 38 

William 



82 
90 

7i 33 
61 09 

5o 25 
28 13 
23 38 
!9 2 5 



22 22 
12 62 

9 

1 

6 



85 
94 
3 2 
73 
89 



$670 68 



AREA IN 
YARDS. 



Il6 
697 

4 

17 
28 
18 

309 

264 

152 

108 

61 

126 

327 
108 

55 
41 

5 

20 

211 

62 



2,729 



REMOVING SNOW. 



January.'. $16,021 42 

February 21,207 I2 

March 6,765 43 

November 53 ^8 

December 831 51 



$44,878 86 



3° 



REPORT OF THE 

CLEANING STREETS. 



MONTH. 



January . . 
February.. 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August. . . . 
September. 



* 831 
!> 2 37 
i»53! 
i>3 6 4 
968 
1,648 
1,724 

October | 1,785 

November 1 ,022 

December 86 



CLEANING. 



SWEEPING. 



08 
58 

3 2 
02 

80 

20 

93 

72 

27 

75 



>I2,200 67 



* 479 97 
746 86 
623 31 
626 82 
606 64 
671 61 
611 32 

579 53 
683 11 

86 26 
$5,715 43 



SPARROW 
GANG. 



$I,68l 26 
1,231 50 

i,473 OI 
i,557 61 
1,840 77 
1,810 37 
1,843 60 
1,982 76 
1,893 21 
1,820 68 
1,949 00 
1,856 44 

120,940 21 



SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS. 



3 1 



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SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS. 



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35 



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REPORT OF THE 

GRADING STREETS. 



STREET. 




Auburn 

Ardell 

Butman Road (Cinders) 
By 

Barker 

Billings 

Butler Ave 

Burgess 

Blossom 

B 

Christian 

Clitheroe (Cinders) 

Campaw 

Columbus Ave 

Cottage 

Carter 

Canada 

Cross 

Dover 

Dunfey 

Dalton 

Essex 

Exeter 

Ennell 

Fourth Ave 

Foster 

Fort Hill Ave 

Highland Ave 

Hildreth 

Hudson 

Hastings 

Inland 

Ina 

King 

Livingston 

Livingston Ave 

Lincoln 

Liberty 

Lipton 



5ii 

65 

J 5° 



10 



78 



12 



LENGTH. 
IN FEET. 



SUPERINTENDENT OE STREETS. 

GRADING STREETS — Continued. 



37 



STREET. 



Lawrence 

Ludlam 

Maple (Cinders) . . 

Maple 

Merrill 

Nicollet 

Oakland 

Olive 

Prospect 

Parker 

Railroad 

Sutherland 

Sarah Ave 

School 

Smith 

Stevens 

Sanders Ave 

Sixth Ave 

Third (Cinders) . . . 

Third 

Tenth 

West Sixth 

West London 

West (Centralville) 

Worthen 

Willow 

West (Ayer's City) . 



COST. 


LENGTH 




IN FEET. 


$109 75 


300 


259 09 


555 


J5 1 94 


1,000 


I »774 53 


945 


21 25 


108 


17 25 


5o 


191 91 


75o 


27 00 


144 


12 75 


100 


37' 00 


60 


x 3i °5 


834 


36 00 


225 


649 15 


420 


280 73 


1,080 


63 09 


664 


2,070 64 


4,230 


122 34 


250 


128 25 


45° 


J 45 63 


479 


5i 38 


150 


5i 72 


300 


128 82 


200 


40 92 


140 


413 16 


805 


321 96 


846 


65 90 


58i 


55 25 


235 



115,619 92 



36,315 



3» 



REPORT OF THE 

CINDER SIDEWALKS. 



STREET. 



Avon 

Adams 

Blodgett 

Bertram 

By 

Broadway 

Boyleston 

Blossom 

Barker 

B 

Crawford 

Chelmsford.. 

Chestnut 

Dalton 

Everett 

Essex 

Exeter 

Fourth Ave... 
Georgia Ave.. 

Grace 

Gorham 

Grand 

Gates 

Gershom Ave 

Houghton 

Holyrood Ave 

Hildreth 

Highland Ave 

Hale 

Inland 

Jenness 

Libert}' 

Lincoln 

Ludlam 

Lipton 

Lagrange 

Magnolia 

Mt. Grove... 

Mt. Hope 

Main 



COST. 



25 
13 06 

28 47 
38 42 

101 39 

3 2 2 5 
262 47 

79 00 

36 22 

2 81 

159 88 

187 56 

6 50 

19 88 

9 75 
75 01 
56 34 
41 12 
n 69 

8 69 
21 25 
16 13 

15 12 

59 81 

16 37 

17 53 

58 11 
214 66 

5 63 

59 67 
140 93 

8 68 
70 19 
10 44 
62 38 
13 82 

29 05 

77 94 
35 <=>6 
72 38 



LENGTH 
IN FEET. 

560 
282 

750 

458 
I,8oo 

475 
1,776 

2,396 

475 
100 

T >345 

940 

96 

330 
225 
624 

369 

2,783 
400 

54o 

690 

140 

*35 

1,065 

J 75 

3 X 7 

1,500 

2,347 

200 

650 

2,334 
270 

2,089 
213 
810 

295 
228 

555 

525 
1,700 



SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS. 

CINDER SIDEWALKS — Continued. 



STREET. 




Mead 

Oakland 

Otis 

Pine 

Reservoir 

Riverside 

Sanders Ave 

Sixth Ave 

South Highland 

Shaw 

St. James 

Sidney 

Suffolk Court. . 

Sarah Ave 

Tanner 

Varnum Ave 

Wilder 

Westford 

White 



29 50 

i7 53 

38 62 

61 69 

88 01 
2 3 38 

39 57 

62 47 

3 66 

4 35 

3 62 

35 2 5 
9 6 3 

59 °° 
113 75 

3 6 97 

61 50 

4 5 6 
61 69 

$2,979 66 



LENGTH 
IN FEET. 



8lO 



250 
464 

725 

543 
156 
375 
35o 
50 
90 

50 
780 

i75 

73o 

1,100 

500 

900 

180 

1,000 

42,190 



40 



REPORT OF THE 

CONCRETE CROSSINGS REPAIRED IN 1904. 



STREET. 



LOCATION, 



Belmont At 

Chambers 

Chester 

Dover 

Edson 

Eighth 

Eighth 

Elliott 

Grove 

Holyrood Ave. 
Holyrood Ave. 

Hovey 

Hovey 

Kimball Ave.. 

Lawson 

Madison 

Mansur 

Mansur 

Marlborough.. 

Middlesex 

Princeton 

Read . 

Read 

Simpson 

Sixth 

Wilder 

Wilder 



Pine St., hard concrete 

Pine Hill St., hard top dressing 

Princeton St., hard top dressing. . . 

Branch St., hard concrete 

Westford St., hard top dressing 

Methuen St., hard concrete 

Methuen St., hard top dressing 

Middlesex St., hard concrete 

Coral St., hard concrete 

Hovey St., hard top dressing 

Hovey St., hard concrete 

Wentworth Ave., hard concrete 

Wentworth Ave., hard top dressing 

Queen St., hard top dressing 

Queen St., hard top dressing 

Gorham St., hard concrete 

Wentworth Ave., hard concrete . . 
Wentworth Ave., hard top dressing 

Pine St., hard concerte 

Wilder St., hard top dressing 

Wilder St., hard top dressing 

N. S. Sixth St., hard top dressing. 
S. S. Sixth St., hard top dressing.. 

Third St., hard concrete 

Read St., hard top dressing 

Middlesex St., hard top dressing... 
Princeton St., hard top dressing... 



COST. 



31 80 

15 4i 
24 36 

39 30 
19 38 

10 85 

2 3 45 
37 00 

33 37 
41 70 

4 40 

3 48 

1 3 3° 
27 79 

15 80 

7 10 



15 
90 

15 



22 26 
24 64 

23 80 
30 70 
27 02 

37 17 
12 18 

$521 96 



SQ. 

VDS. 



31 

2 3 
34. 



39 

28, 

i5 
i5 
33 
31 

5 
41 

4 

5 

19 
39 
i5 

7 

4 

3 

4 
3 1 
35 
34 
30 
38 
53 
17 



650.6 



SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS. 



41 



RESOLUTIONS PASSED BUT SIDEWALKS NOT COM 

PLETED. 



STREET. 


LOCATION. 


\Y REN 

pass'd 


LIN. FT. OF 
EDGE TO BE 
LAID 


Genoa Ave 

King 


Both sides Sarah Ave. to Bod well 
Ave., edge and cinders 

W.'S. from Middlesex St. to Jack- 
son St., eds;e and cinders 


1904 
1904 


1,198.00 




206.OO 




1,464.00 



CONCRETE PAVEMENT REPAIRED IN 1904. 



STREET. 


LOCATION. 


COST. 


SQ. 
YDS. 


Bridge 


B. S. Between Merrimack Square and 
Central Bridge (Bicycle Path) 
hard top dressing 


$ 89 88 
in 30 

296 40 
244 65 

194 60 


128.4 


Chelmsford . . . 
Pawtucket 


E. S. Bicycle Path, hard top dressing 

S. S. Between School and Mt. Vernon 

Sts 


159.O 
442.4 


» 

a 
it 


N. S. Between School and Salem Sts. 

S. S. Between Mt. Washington and 

Salem Sts 


349-5 
278-0 








$936 83 


*357-3 



42 REPORT OF THE 

CONCRETE SIDEWALKS REPAIRED IN 1904. 




Aiken 

Bartlett.... 

a 

Belmont. . . 

Branch 

Bridge 



Chambers.. 

Charles 

Chelmsford 



Chestnut 

Coburn 

Cushing 

Davidson 

Dover 

it 

E. Merrimack. 



Elliott.. 



First. 



Fort Hill Ave. 

Franklin 

Front 

Gates 

Hastings 

High.. 



James. 



Jefferson 
Kitson... 



W 

s. 

N. 
W 

s. 
s. 

N. 

s. : 
w. 



. s. 

s. 

s. 

. s. 

s. 

E. 



From Moody St., northerly 

Between High and Alder Sts 

From Alder St. easterly 

No. 3 

No. 16 : 

Between No. 881 and Thirteenth 
St 



X. 
E. 

N. 
W. 
W. 
E. 

s. : 

N. 

N. 

s. : 
W. 

s. 
s. 
w 

N. 

w 
w 

B. 
E. 
E. 

W. 

w. 

E. 
E. 

N. 



S. 
S. 

s. 
s. 

s. 



s. 



At Training School House 

Between Westford and Howard 
Sts 

Between High and Ash St 

Between Lakeview Ave. and 
Jewett St 

From Clapp's Stable, westerly. . 

Near East Merrimack 

Between Grove and Branch Sts. 

a a tt tt a 

From High St., easterly 

Between Stackpole and Brown 

Sts 

No. 364 



S. From No. 9, easterly 

S. Front No. 65 

. S. Between Andover and Oak Sts. 

S. At Willie St 

. and N. Sides 

. S. From Marshall St., easterly 

S 



s. 
s. 

. s. 
s. 



At East Merrimack St 

Between East Merrimack and 

Bartlett Sts 

At Chestnut St 



$12 82 

222 67 

18 27 

5 69 

2 02 

2 70 

1 3 5o 
1 80 

9 81 
49 42 

3 6o 
73 4o 

9 20 
10 21 
22 27 
18 90 

164 56 
1 48 

55 03 

!Q3 57 

1 80 

90 

65 

49 

5o 
62 

74 

!5 



45 °4 
2 61 

27 54 
21 46 

25 80 

45 



28.5 

458-9 
40.6 

12.7 
4-3 

6.0 

30-0 

4.0 

21.8 
109.8 

8.0 

163. 1 

9.2 

22.7 

49-5 
42.0 

365-7 

3-3 
122.3 

201.2 

4.0 

2.0 

17.0 

12.2 

10. o 

I2 -5 
17.2 

7.0 
100. 1 

5-8 

61.2 

47-7 
25.8 

1.0 



SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS. 43 

CONCRETE SIDEWALKS REPAIRED IN 1904 — Continued. 



STREET. 



Lakeview Ave. 

Marshall 

Methuen 

Middlesex SS. 



Moody 
Moore . 



Mt. Vernon. 
Myrtle 



Nesmith . . 
Oak 



LOCATION. 



s. s. 

N. S. 
E. S. 
S. S. 

N. S. 
N. S. 
N. S. 

W. S. 
E. S. 

E. S. 
W. S. 



From Front St., easterly and 

No. 64 

Between Carlton and Gates Sts. 
Between Seventh and Tenth Sts 
Between Howard St. and R. R 

Crossing 

Front No. 187 

From Aiken St., westerly 

Between Gorham and Bleachery 

Sts 

Front No. 115 

Between Third and Sixth Sts. 

From Third St., northerly 

From East Merrimack St., 

southerly 



S. S. 

N. S. 

Pine IN.S. 

Queen W. S. 

Read AY. S. 

Sixth S. S. 

N. S. 
Smith W. S. 



South . . 



. . . w. s. 

E. S. 



Front No. 4 

At A. T. Smith's 

Between Lawson and Somerset 

Sts 

Front No. 56 

From Read St., easterly 

Between Fremont and Beacon. . 
Between Branch and Westford 

Sts 

Between Appleton and Summer 

Sts 

Between Middlesex and Apple 

ton Sts 



So. Nichols. 
Stevens 



E. S. 
E. S. 

E. S. 



Summer N. S. 

Third N. S. 

Tremont \Y. S. 

Varnum \Y. S. 



Between Princeton and West 
ford Sts 

Between Princeton and Middle 
sex Sts 

From South St., westerly. ...... 

From Myrtle St., easterly 

Between Moody and Merrimack 
Sts 

At Sixth St 



COST. 


$5 
16 


26 
02 


54 


81 


2 


65 


20 


10 


5 


58 


11 


25 


1 


66 


11 


30 


34 


33 


22 


09 


17 


10 


3 


65 


4 9° 


7 
6 


83 
16 


54 

*9 


36 

08 


11 


65 


45 


94 


84 64 
9 67 


9 09 


49 


2 3 


4 


41 


35 


10 


12 
2 


64 
67 



SQ. 
YDS. 



II. 7 

35-6 
121. 8 

5-9 
20.1 

12.4 

25.0 

3*7 
IJ -3 
70-3 

49- 1 
38.0 

8.1 
4-9 

17.4 

!3-7 
120.8 

42.4 

2 5-9 
102. 1 

167.8 
21.5 

20.2 

109.4 

9.8 

78.0 

22.1 

8.9 



44 REPORT OF THE 

CONCRETE SIDEWALKS REPAIRED IN 1904 — Continued. 



STREET. 



WentworthAve 

Westford 

Willie 



Worthen . . 



Whitney Ave. 



location. 



E.S. 

N. S. 

w. s. 

E.S. 
E.S. 

W. S. 

E.S. 
W.S. 

S. s. 



Near Hovey St 

At Foster St 

Front No. 91 

At Franklin St 

Between Broadway and Kitson 

Sts 

Between Broadway and Kitson 

Sts 

At Broadway 

Between Broadway and Kitson 

Sts 



COST 



$ 94 
4 50 
4 9° 
2 20 

25 20 

20 25 
1 98 

72 90 
90 



SQ. 
YDS. 



$1,657.61 



2.1 
IO. O 

10-9 
4-9 

56.0 

45-o 
4-4 

162.0 

2.0 

35o8.: 




u 

I— i 
> 

u 

o 

m 

Q 
o 
o 



o 

K 

CO 

H 
O 

i— i 
\4 
O 
O 

< 

CO 



H 
P< 

O 

o 
Q 

I— I 

w 

H 
W 
W 

H 

CO 

W 
M 

< 



SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS. 

CONCRETE SIDEWALKS TOP DRESSED IN 1904. 



45 



STREET. 



Aiken. . 
Bartlett 
Bridge . 



LOCATION. 



Central 

Chambers . . . 

Charles 

Chelmsford . 

Coburn 



Concord . 
Cushing. . 
Davidson 
Dover 



W. S. 

N. S. 
E. S. 
E. S. 
E. S. 

E. S. 
W. S. 

N. S. 



From Moody St., westerly 

From Alden St., easterly 

Between Seventh and Eighth Sts. 
Between Ninth and Tenth Sts . . 
Between No. 88 t and Thir- 
teenth St 

Opposite No. 880 

From Chapel St., northerly 



E. Merrimack 

Edson 

Elliott 



S. S. 

w. s. 

|E.S. 
E. S. 

In. s. 
w. s. 
w. s. 

E. S. 

s. s. 
w. s. 

E. S. 



First 

Fort Hill Ave. 

Foster 

Fourth 

Franklin 

Front 

Gibson 



At Training School House 

Between Westford and Howard 
Sts 

Between Lakeview Ave. and 
Jewett Sts 

from Pond St., southerly 

From Clapp's Stable, westerly. - . 

Near East Merrimack St 

Between Grove and Branch Sts. 
Between Grove and Branch Sts. 

From High St., easterly 

Near Westford St 



Grove. 



Harrison . 
High.... 

(I 
It 

u 



S. and N. Sides, Nos. 9, 65, 12, 18 & 20 
W. S. Between Andover and Oak Sts. 
W. S. Between Pine and Westford Sts. 

S. S. Front No. 71 

N. S. At Willie St 

W. and N. Sides 

W. S 

N. S. Between Dover and Wilder Sts. 
N. S. Between Manahan and Walker 

Sts 

W. S 

E. S. At Engine House 

E. S. From Porter St., northerly 

E. S. At East Merrimack St 

E. S. Between East Merrimack and 

Bartlett Sts 



:ost. 


12 46 
51 66 


19 92 
64 86 


5 1 30 


4 20 


25 47 
89 28 

1 85 


79 « 


68 74 


15 42 
54 60 


3 99 


105 57 


102 33 
10 56 

6 37 


19 17 
48 43 


39 27 

167 74 

3 ° 6 


10 22 


22.68 


46 56 
18 51 


49 44 


35 37 
45 56 


4 71 


11 10 


9 15 


13 01 



27-7 

172.2 

66.4 

216.2 

171. o 
14.0 

84-9 

297.6 
4-i 

263-7 

202.5 

5i-4 
182.0 

5-7 

35i-9 

34i -1 

35- 2 

9-i 

63-9 
161. 6 

130.9 

545-o 
10.2 
14.6 
75-6 

155-2 
61.7 

164.8 

H7-9 

155-2 

i5-7 

37-° 

3°-5. 

43-7 



46 REPORT OF THE 

CONCRETE SIDEWALKS TOP DRESSED IN 1904 — Cont. 



STREET. 



James... 
Jefferson. 



LOCATION. 



w. s. 

E. S. 
E. S. 



Kitson 

Lake view Ave. 



Lane 

Mansur 

Marlborough.. 

Merrimack Sq, 

Methuen 

Middlesex St.. 
Moody 

Moore 



Myrtle... 
'Nesmith. 



Nichols . 
Oak.... 

Pine 

Porter.. 



Princeton. 

Salem 

Sixth 



Smith 



Smith Ave 



W. S. 

N. S. 
N. S. 
N.S. 

N. S. 

s. s. 
s. s. 

E. S. 

N.S. 
E. S. 
W. S. 

s. s. 

E. S. 

N.S. 

s. s. 

N.S. 
N.S. 

w. s. 

E.S. 

W. S. 

N.S. 

s. s. 

N.S. 

N.S. 

N.S. 
N.S. 
N.S. 

s. s. 

E. S. 
W. S. 

E. S. 



COST. 



From Coburn St., easterly 

From Bridge St., westerly 

No. 64 and Front St., easterly. . 
Between Front St., and No. 94 
From Westford St., southerly., 
from No. 68, easterlv 



Near Concord River 

Between Seventh and Tenth Sts. 

Front No. 187 

Front No. 472 

From Aiken St., westerly 

Between Gorham and Bleacherv 

Sts 

Between Fourth and Sixth Sts. . 
Between Third and Sixth Sts . . 
From East Merrimack St., 

southerly 



Between Gibson and Foster Sts. 
Between High St. and Fort Hill 

Ave 

Between Canton and Wilder Sts. 

From Decatur St., easterly 

From Fremont St., easterly 

From Read St., easterly 

Between Branch and Westford 

Sts «. 

Between Branch and Westford 

Sts 



$33 06 

54 81 
45 6o 

33 99 

23 71 

22 58 
90 06 

16 94 
62 16 

35 72 

5o 43 
163 23 

150 81 

24 12 

74 58 

59 7i 

3 93 
12 12 

96 72 
90 60 
64 86 

70 47 
20 49 
78 60 

17 97 

47 28 
24 24 

18 27 
10 80 
3° 2 4 

97 02 

68 15 

55 82 



SQ. 
YDS. 



II0.2 

83-5 
174.2 

152.O 

IJ 3-3 

52-7 
64.2 

300.2 

50-4 
207.2 

96.0 
168. 1 



544- 

502. 

80. 

248. 

85- 
1 3- 



40.4 

322.4 
302.0 
216.2 

234-9 

39-5 

262.0 

59-9 

157-6 
80.8 
60.9 
36.0 

120.8 

267.4 

201.3 
159.8 



SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS. 47 

CONCRETE SIDEWALKS TOP DRESSED IN 1904 — Cont. 



STREET 



Smith Ave. 
South 

Stevens 



Summer.. . 
Thorndike. 
Tremont.. 



Varnum . 
Westf ord 



it 
Wilder. 



Whitney Ave.. 
Worthen 



LOCATION. 




W. S 

W. S. Between Appleton and Summer 
Sts 

E. S. Between Princeton and Middle- 
sex Sts 

W. S. Between Princeton and Westf ord 
Sts 

N. S. From South St., westerly 

W. S. From Hale St., southerly 

W. S. Between Moody and Merrimack 
Sts 

W. S. At Sixth St 

N. S. From Edson St., easterly 

S. S. From Burtt St., westerly 

S. S. Between Burtt St. and Stevens 
St 

S. S. Between Marlborough and 

Robbins Sts 

N. S. Between Stevens and Edson Sts. 

W. S. At Middlesex St. . . .'.' 

E. S. From Middlesex St., southerly. . 

E. and N. Sides 

S. S 

W. S. Between Broadway and Kitson 
St 

E. S. Between Broadway and Kitson St 



$45 93 
30 60 

16 41 

16 29 
2 97 

in 78 

29 67 
4 00 

4 26 

9 09 
43 74 

25 29 
22 32 

5 74 
32 49 
34 68 
7 1 3i 

4 35 
80 89 

$3,683 62 



125-5 
102.0 

54-7 

54-3 

9-9 

360.2 

98.9 
8.9 

14.2 
30-3 

145-8 

84-3 

74-4 

8.2 

108.3 

115. 6 

237-7 

i4-5 
269.6 

5711.6 



48 REPORT OF THE 

STREETS LAID OUT AND ACCEPTED IN 1904. 



STREET. 


LOCATION. 


WIDTH 
IN FT. 


Length 

IN FEET. 


Barker 

Fourth Ave.. . 

Genoa Ave 

Highland Ave . 

Lipton 

Street 


From Exeter St. to Hovey Ave 

" Mount Hope St. to Moody St.. 

" Sarah Ave. to Bodwell Ave 

" Pine St. to Parker St 


40 
60 
40 
40 
4° 


276.1 

634.0 

619.0 

1,381.6 

345-o 


" Midland St. to Forrest St 

Land at Junction of Butman Road, 
Hovey St., and Holyrood Ave. 




1 




3,255-7 
or 0.62 

Miles 



Number of miles of accepted streets January 1, 1904 I2 6-39 

Number of miles of streets accepted in 1904 0.62 

Number of miles of accepted streets January 1, 1905 127.01 



SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS. 

RESETTING EDGESTONES. 



49 



STREET. 



Alder 

Bartlett 

Broadway 

Crowley 

Chelmsford 

Elliott 

East Merrimack 

Fayette 

Grove 

Howard 

High 

Hildreth 

Hurd 



James. 
John.. 



Livingston . . . 

Liberty 

Lawrence . . . 

Moore 

Marshall 

Middlesex. . . 
Marlborough 

Methuen 

Meadowcroft 
Merrimack. . 

Moody 

Sixth/ 

South , 

Stevens 

Sixth 

YVestford 

YVorthen 

William 




> 26 25 
207 47 

1 75 

13 5o 
10 92 

69 57 
127 37 

5 5o 
39 8 9 

4 38 
28 12 



55 
50 



89 42 

32 07 



66 
22 



3 

7 
40 75 

9 38 

6 01 
11 50 

3 34 

4 37 
4 22 

28 40 

6 31 

7 62 
131 20 

5° 03 
22 22 

9 94 

95 53 

4 3 6 

il,Il6 32 



LENGTH 
IN FEET. 



184 
I>5 6 9 

35 
150 
150 
490 
850 

55 
265 

40 

230 

100 

50 
500 

238 

100 

120 

33° 
90 

7i 
120 

40 

40 

57 
420 

64 
100 

738 
180 

300 

5° 
500 

40 
8,266 



REPORT OF THE 



LEDGE. 



March 

April. ..:. 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 
October... 
November. 
December. 



COST. 



$ 51 


00 


807 


j8 


i,3 l6 


29 


1,624 


3 1 


i,59 2 


87 


1,849 


75 


1,786 


41 


1,930 


50 


1,804 


00 


376 


2 5 



$13,138 56 



SUNDRY WORK 



Sundries 

Screening Sand 

Sanding Sidewalks . . 

Teaming Sand 

Repairing Streets 

Grading Sidewalks. . 

Wind Guards 

Repairing Sidewalks. 
Lowering Driveways 

Painting Bridges 

Building Fountain. . . 



COST. 



$ 873 


92 


889 


21 


938 


22 


843 


13 


2,875 


92 


107 


01 


117 


25 


200 


87 


30 97 


204 


00 


146 


47 



$7,226 97 



SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS. 

ASPHALT PAVEMENT REPAIRED. 



5i 



STREET. 



Aiken 

Gorham.. 
Hall 



REPAIRED BY 



Union Paving Co 

a a a 



AREA IN 
YARDS. 


COST PER 
YARD. 


*54-57 
123-95 
iQ5- 2 3 


$2 95 

2 95 
2 95 


383-75 



TOTAL 
COST. 



461 89 

345 65 
3 J o 43 



»i,ii7 97 



CREO-RESINATE WOOD PAVEMENT. 



STREET. 


LOCATION. 


SQUARE 
YARDS. 


COST PER 
YARD. 


TOTAL 
COST. 


Aiken 


Bridge over Merrimack River 


2,652 


$2 IO 


$4,569 20 



PERMITS GRANTED 1904 

Sewer Permits Granted 

Inspections Made 

Street Obstruction Permits Granted 

Sewer Permits for Stopped Connections 

Building Permits Issued 



237 

233 
102 

23 
60 



52 REPORT OF THE 

SEWER CONSTRUCTION. 



TABLE SHOWING IN DETAIL COST OF SEWERS CONSTRUCTED IN 1904. 



Avon Street Sewer No. i. 

Labor $767 18 

Sewer Pipe $ 149 27 

Cement 8 08 

Repairing Water Pipe 6 75 

Oil 1 50 

Caps. 3 75 

Dualin 621 

Sharpening Tools 90 

Use of Lumber 29 00 

Engineering 30 00 

Brick 8 75 

Castings 1674 

Sand 1 00 $261 95 $1,029 13 



Avon Street Sewer No. 2. 

Labor $114 88 

Sewer Pipe $ 2581 

Cement 1 08 

Engineering 15 ' 00 41 89 $156 77 



By Street Sewer. 

Labor $1,721 26 

Sewer Pipe $ 351 08 

Cement 42 00 

Oatmeal 325 

Dualin 8 28 

Caps 2 15 

Oil 1 00 

Use of Lumber 7 5 00 

Sharpening Tools 22 35 

Engineering 40 00 

Brick 43 75 

Castings 60 48 

Sand 4 00 $653 34 $2,374 60 



Boisvert Street Sewer. 

Labor $568 67 

Sewer Pipe $ 185 54 

Cement 7 56 




o 
z 

I— I 

> 
< 

Ph 

u 
o 
hJ 

PQ 
P 
< 

W 

Ph 

< 
Ph 

Ph 
< 

o 

t— I 

w 

o 
p 

I— I 

Ph 

PQ 

H 
W 

Ph 

H 



SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS. 53 

SEWER CONSTRUCTION— Continued. 

Boisvert Street Sewer — Continued. 

Sharpening Tools '. $2 60 

Use of Lumber 44 00 

Engineering 15 00 

Brick 17 50 

Castings 3 2 40 

Sand 2 00 $306 60 $875 27 

Beaulieu Street Sewer. r 

Labor $3,166 91 

Sewer Pipe S 216 23 

Sharpening Tools 19 95 

Coal 7 00 

Oatmeal 675 

Caps 12 00 

Dualin 23 00 

Oil 2 50 

Repairing 496 

Use of Lumber 50 00 

Engineering 7 5 00 

Cement 7 56 

Brick 15 60 

Castings p 2808 $46863 $3,63554 

Bridge Street Sewer. 

Labor $250 93 

Engineering $ 15 00 

Brick 2 83 

Castings 4 05 

Sewer Pipe 46 3 1 

Cement 1 08 

Use of Lumber 1000 $7927 $33020 

Colonial Avenue Sewer. 

Labor $3,118 54 

Cement $ 23 76 

Oatmeal 6 50 

Oil 200 

Dualin n 50 

Tar Paper 1 15 

Caps 11 28 

Sewer Pipe 491 45 



54 REPORT OF THE 

SEWER CONSTRUCTION- Continued. 

Colonial Avenue Sewer — Continued. 

Use of Lumber. $ ioo oo 

Brick 41 14 

Sand 4 00 

Use of Water 1 60 

Engineering 50 00 

Castings ■ 70 74 $815 12 $3,933 66 



Dana Street Sewer. 

Labor $941 98 

Sewer Pipe $ 55 42 

Sharpening Tools 17 95 

Use of Lumber 35 00 

Engineering 25 00 

Cement 14 04 

Brick 18 38 

Castings 29 16 

Sand 2 00 $196 95 $1,138 93 



Eaton Street Sewer. 

Labor $204 56 

Sewer Pipe $ 62 55 

Cement 4 99 

Brick 8 75 < 

Castings 14 58 

Use of Lumber 15 00 

Engineering 5 00 $110 87 $315 46 



Forrest and Stevens Streets Sewer. 

Labor $29,058 14 

Engineering $ 200 00 

Sewer Pipe 1,353 88 

Oil 15 00 

Sharpening Tools 138 85 

Oatmeal 46 5c 

Brick 2,848 41 

Teaming 703 50 

Lumber 1,50931 

Cement 1,200 29 

Tar Paper 3 45 

Sand in 00 

Caps 2 50 



SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS. 55 

SEWER CONSTRUCTION— Continued. 

Forrest and Stevens Streets Sewer — Continued. 

Dualin $ 3 68 

Rubber Boots 10 50 

Castings 93 9° 

Iron Pipe 75 41 

Repairing Pipe 1530 $8,33154 $37,38968 

Genoa and Bodwell Avenues Sewer. 

Labor $1,680 13 

Sewer Pipe $62 1 70 

Oil 1 00 

Sharpening Tools 2 40 

Dualin 230 

Caps 187 

Oatmeal 6 50 

Use of Lumber 144 00 

Engineering 3 5 00 

Castings 104 22 

Cement 59 5° 

Brick 9554 $1,07403 $2,75416 

Highland Avenue Sewer. 



■■& 



Labor $1,291 55 

Sewer Pipe $290 16 

Oil 50 

Use of Lumber 66 00 

Sand 4 00 

Engineering 30 00 . 

Cement 18 60 

Brick 27 13 

Castings 59 40 $495 79 $1,787 34 



Hildreth Street Sewer. 

Labor $825 69 

Sewer Pipe $113 74 

Sharpening Tools 13 65 

Oil 1 50 

Oatmeal 5 05 

Use of Lumber 28 00 

Engineering 25 00 



5^ REPORT OF THE 

SEWER CONSTRUCTION— Continued. 

Hildreth Street Sewer — Continued. 

Sand $ 2 oo 

Cement 14 04 

Brick 20 13 

Castings 31 32 $254 43 $1,080 12 

Lipton Street Sewer. 

Labor $247 55 

Sewer Pipe $ 75 37 

Cement 875 

on t 50 

Sharpening Tools 1 20 

Use of Lumber 18 00 

Engineering 15 00 

Brick 10 69 

Castings 16 74 

Sand 1 00 $147 25 $394 80 

Riverside Street Sewer. 

Labor $2,439 61 

Sewer Pipe $402 77 

Coal 42 02 

Oil 4 00 

Sharpening Tools 1 20 

Dualin 30 82 

Caps 5 62 

Use of Lumber 91 00 

Use of Water 7 34 

Engineering 45 00 

Cement 37 65 

Brick 39 39 

Sand 6 00 

Castings 70 74 $783 55 $3,223 16 

Short Street Sewer. 

Labor $276 01 

Sewer Pipe $136 95 

Sharpening Tools 1 60 

Oil 50 

Use of Lumber 31 00 

Engineering 10 00 

Cement 9 83 



SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS. 57 

SEWER CONSTRUCTION— Continued. 

Short Street Sewer — Continued. 

Brick $ 17 50 

Sand 2 00 

Castings 27 oo $236 38 $512 39 

Staples Street Sewer. 

Labor $490 49 

Sewer Pipe $118 58 

Use of Lumber 28 00 

Engineering 20 00 

Cement 8 90 

Castings 17 82 

Brick 8 75 

Sand 1 00 $203 05 $693 54 

Stronquist Avenue Sewer. 

Labor $20,783 38 

Land Damage $ 7 10 00 

Brick 1,737 24 

Teaming 500 00 

Sand 26 25 

Cement 1,246 10 

Iron Pipe 1,368 56 

Oil 11 00 

Castings 80 83. 

Sewer Pipe 10 77 

Engineering 13265 $5,82340 $26,60678 

Sanders Avenue Sewer. 

Labor $1,182 32 

Engineering $ 30 00 

Sewer Pipe 162 70 

Use of Lumber 35 00 

Cement 1482 

Castings 30 24 

Brick 14 18 $28694 $1,46926 

Stevens, West Forrest and Clifford Streets. 

Labor $9,591 51 

Engineering $75 00 

Cement 219 24 



58 REPORT OF THE 

SEWER CONSTRUCTION— Continued. 

Stevens, West Forrest and Clifford Streets — Continued. 

Sand $1 2 00 

Brick 119 36 

Sewer Pipe 1 ,001 57 

Teaming 9 00 

Castings 123 66 $1,559 83 $11,151 34 

Westford Street Sewer. 

Labor $1,159 94 

Oil $2 50 

Caps 7 50 

Dualin 16 79 

Sharpening Tools 8 60 

Use of Lumber 50 00 

Use of Water 155 

Engineering. 45 00 

Castings 30 24 

Sand 4 00 

Sewer Pipe 12302 

Cement 17 50 

Brick 19 79 $326 49 $1,486 43 

West Sixth Street Sewer. 

Labor $876 63 

Sewer Pipe $218 67 

Oil 1 00 

Dualin 4 60 

Caps 1 87 

Use of Lumber 40 00 

Engineering 30 00 

Sharpening Tools I 9 I 5 

Sand 2 00 

Castings 27 00 , 

Cement 10 50 

Brick 26 25 $381 04 $1,257 67 



White Street Sewer. 

Labor $3,820 12 

Sacks $ 8 00 

Engineering 148 00 

Cement 541 18 

Teaming 13 00 



SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS. 59 

SEWER CONSTRUCTION— Continued. 

White Street Sewer — Continued. 

Coal $ 58 93 

Sand 3 00 

Iron Pipe *, l 5 2 2 9 

Caps 3 00 

Rubber Boots 550 

Dualin 138 

Oil 2 50 

Oatmeal 6 75 

Sharpening Tools 24 00 

Granite Blocks 224 20 $2,191 73 $6,011 85 



Woodcock Street Sewer. 

Labor $774 73 

Sewer Pipe $99 03 

Use of Lumber 28. 00 

Engineering 20 00 

Cement 1 1 06 

Sand 1 00 

Brick 8 75 

Castings 14 58 S182 42 $957 15 



Wood Street Sewer. 

Labor $204 34 

Engineering $18 00 

Oil 50 

Sewer Pipe 163 70 

Use of Lumber 20 00 

Cement 4 32 

Castings 27 00 

Brick 1063 $24415 $44849 

$111,013 72 



Oo REPORT OF THE 

REPAIRS OF SEWERS. 

.. .i . , 

Table Showing Sewers Repaired i\ 1904. 

( rorham Street Sewer. 

Labor $ 1 7 5 60 

Cement $525 

Brick 10 98 

Castings 16 74 $3297 $20857 

C;mton Street Sewer. 

Labor $301 35 

Cement $ 7 56 

Brick 8 75 

Sewer Pipe <Sy 50 

Engineering S 00 $111 Si $413 16 

East Merrimack Street Sewer. 

Labor $1,486 86 

Engineering $56 00 

Sewer Pipe 356 44 

Cement 25 47 

Brick 38 50 

Castings 40 50 $51691 $2,003 77 

City Hall Avenue Sewer. 

Labor $1,042 17 

Engineering $42 00 

Sewer Pipe 104 79 

Cement 10 91 

Brick 28 3<> 

Castings 13 50 

Oil 2 00 $201 56 $1,243 73 

John Street Avenue Sewer. 

Labor $91 42 

Brick $ 8.75 

Cement ' 3 82 

Castings 54 

Sewer Pipe 1 90 $1501 $10643 

Market Street Sewer. 

Labor.. $88 87 $88 87 



SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS. 6 I 

REPAIRS OF SEWERS— Continued. 

VVhittier's Mill Sewer. 

Labor $203 82 

Brick. $27 50 

Cement % . 10 65 

Iron Pipe 26 00 

Engineering 20 50 $84 65 $288 47 

$4,353 °° 



62 



REPORT OF THE 



STREET CATCH BASINS BUILT DURING THE YEAR 1904 
NOTE. — Catch Basins marked thus * were rebuilt. 



STREET. 



Abbott 

*Ash 

*Ash 

*Bartlett 

*Bartlett 

*Bartlett 

*Bartlett 

*Bartlett 

*Bartlett 

Bellevue 

Bertram 

♦Central 

♦Central 

♦Chelmsford... 

♦Chestnut 

♦Chestnut 

*Citv Avenue.. 

Cumberland 

Road 

*E. Merrimack 
*E. Merrimack 
*E. Merrimack 

♦Elliott 

♦Elliott 

Emery 

Essex 

Essex 

Essex 

Exeter 

Exeter 

Fifth Ave.... 

Forrest 

Forrest 

Grace 

Grace 

Hawthorn 

Highland Ave. 

Holvrood Ave. 



LOCATION. 



N. side 30.2 ft. W. of W. side Lawrence St, 
E. side 12.7 ft. S. of S. side E. Merrimack St, 
W. side 14.7 ft. S. of S. side E. Merrimack St, 

S. side 13 ft. W. of W. side Alder St 

N. side 5.7 ft. W. of W. side Alder St 

N. side 192.6 ft. W. of W. side Alder St 

N. side 313.7 ft. W. of W. side Alder St 

N. side 480 ft. W. of W. side Alder St 

N. side 10 ft. E. of E. side Alder St 

E. side 6.5 ft. N. of N. side Thayer St 

S. side 6.5 ft. E. of E. side Georgia Ave 

E. side 8.7 ft. S. of S. side Williams St 

E. side 24.4 ft. S. of S. side Hurd St 

W. side 100 ft. N. of intersection Powell St. . 

N. side 14 ft. E. of E. side Willow St 

S. side 6.5 ft. E. of E. side Willow St 

Middle 61.6 ft. W. of W. side Palmer St 



E. side 7 ft. N. of N. side Ludlam St 

S. side 3.5 ft. W. of E. side Ash St 

N. side on line W. side James Court 

S. side 2.5 ft. W. of E. side Fayette St 

E. side 9.2 ft. S. of S. side Middlesex St 

W. side 8.2 ft. S. of S. side Middlesex St 

S. side 15.5 ft. W. from stone bound at angle 

W. side 6.0 ft. N. of N. side Leeds St 

W. side 48.0 ft. N. of N. side Hovey Ave 

E. side 27.5 ft. N. of intersection Aiken Ave. 
W. side 13 ft. N. of N. side West Sixth St. . 

E. side 1 ft. N. of N. side West Sixth St 

N. side 4.6 ft. E. of E. side Dumfey St 

N. side 130.5 ft. W. of W. side Lipton St. . 

S. side 130.5 ft. W. of W. side Lipton St 

W. side 7.2 ft. N. of N side Burgess St 

E. side 6 ft. N. of N. side of Burgess St 

E. si,de 8 ft. S. of S. side Pine St 

E. side 988 ft. S. of S. side Pine St 

E. side 14.8 ft. S. of S. side Hovey St 



COST. 



$ 48 25 
46 13 

46 45 
41 76 
40 17 

57 32 
51 60 

43 13 

5i 7o 

55 76 
5i 77 
49 35 

47 35 

51 61 

45 03' 
45 03 

5 2 59 

47 02 
12 33 
45 82 

57 IO 
38 64 

33 ° 2 
69 64 

47 °4 

5 1 55 

53 75 

49 OI 

5 6 H 

57 59 

5 2 45 

50 01 

54 43 
56 12 

44 48 

58 35 

45 *3 



SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS. 



63 



STREET CATCH BASINS BUILT DURING THE YEAR 1904. 
Note. — Catch Basins marked thus * were rebuilt. — Continued. 




Holyrood Ave. 
*Lakeview 

Ave 

*Lee 

Leroy 

Lipton 

Livingston 

Livingston 

Main 

Meadowcroft . 

^Middlesex.... 

Norcross 

Xorcross 

Norcross 

Norcross 

Otis 

Parker 

Parker 

Pine 

Riverside 

Sanders Ave.. 

Sutherland 

Stevens 

Stevens 

Stevens 

Stevens 

Stevens 

Stevens 

Third Ave.... 

Tanner 

Walden 

YVestford 



W. side 8 ft. S. of S. side Hovey St 

N. side 15 ft. W. of W. side Exeter St. . '. . . . 

N. side 12 ft. W. of W. side John St 

S. side 10 ft. E. of E. side Loring St 

W. side at intersection Midland St 

E. side 8.6 ft. N. of N. side Carter St 

W. side at intersection Carter St 

E. side 8 ft. N. of N. side Plain St 

W. side 5.5 ft. N. of N. side Boston & Maine 

R. R 

N. side 3.4 ft. E. of W. side Baldwin St 

S. side 7 ft. E. of E. side Stevens St 

N. side 5 ft. E. of E. side Stevens St 

S. side 185 ft. E. of W. side South Wilder St. 
N. side 185 ft. E. of W. side South Wilder St. 

E. side at intersection Otis St 

N. side 2.5 ft. W. of W. side Stevens St 

S. side 5 ft. W. of W. side Stevens St 

N. side 5 ft. W. of W. side Hawthorn St 

N. side at intersection Mount Hope St 

W. side 6.5 ft. S. of S. side Pine St 

S. side 7 ft. W. of W. side Barker Ave 

W. side 147 ft. N. of stone bound N. line 

I C. T. Killpatrick 

E. side 293 ft. N. of stone bound N. line 

C. T. Killpatrick 

W. side 497 ft. N. of stone bound N. line 

C. T. Killpatrick 

E. side 727 ft. N. of stone bound N. line 

C. T. Killpatrick 

W. side 551 ft. at angle S. of S. side Parker St. 
E. side 550 ft. at angle S. of S. side Parker St. 
S. side 317 ft. W. of W. side Mammoth Road 

E. side 51.5 ft. S. of S. side Howard St 

N. side 6 ft. W. of W. side Oakland St 

Track 13.5 ft. W. of W. side Dartmouth St. 



$46 47 

51 86 
23 76 

45 57 

5 1 79 
48 98 

44 66 
42 71 

42 35 
54 36 

53 2 ° 

54 27 

47 62 

46 45 

5i 3 1 
61 61 

45 87 
58 86 
60 66 
51 21 
5i 54 

72 47 

45 47 

43 69 

45 05 

48 38 

41 79 

53 1 & 

77 87 

46 74 
23 50 



6 4 



REPORT OF THE 



STREET CATCH BASINS BUILT DURING THE YEAR 1904. 
Note. — Catch Basins marked thus * were rebuilt. — Continued. 



STREET. 



Westford 
Westford 
Westford 
Worthen . 
Worthen . 
Worthen. 
Worthen . 



location. 



Track 4.7 ft. E. of E. side Tyler Park West 
So. Track 0.5 ft. E. of E. side Osgood St 
No. Track 1 ft. W. of E. side Osgood St 
W. side 10.5 ft. S. of S. side Broadway. 

E. side 11 ft. S. of S. side Broadway 

W. side 36.5 ft. N. of N. side Kitson St 
E. side 7.5 ft. N. of N. side Kitson St. . 



COST. 



$31 25 

23 04 

24 05 

63 64 
123 40 

64 10 
136 39 

$3> 8 °4 3 2 



•qjguai 



SUPER INT 


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ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



CHIEF ENGINEER 



OF THE 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



OF THE 



CITY OF LOWELL 



FOR THE YEAR 1904. 




LOWELL, MASS. 

F. A. M. Tobin's Printery. 

}905. 



REPORT. 



Chief's Office, Palmer St. Engine House, 

Lowell, January i, 1905. 

To the City Council of the City of Lowell : 

Gentlemen : — In accordance with the requirements 
governing the Fire Department, it becomes my duty, as 
Chief Engineer, to present to you the annual report of the 
Fire Department of the City of Lowell for the year ending 
December 31, 1904. 

The report will be found to contain statements in detail, 
embracing the amount of expenditures, a register of the de- 
partment, with age, residence and occupation of each mem- 
ber, a record of all fires and alarms which have occurred 
during the year, and the cause thereof, with the names of 
the owners or occupants, the loss and insurance, as nearly 
as could be ascertained, and such information as is thought 
proper for your consideration. 

The following statement will show the receipts and 
expenditures : 



ANNUAL REPORT 



RECEIPTS. 



Appropriations 



■' $i34>97 6 83 



EXPENDITURES 



Pay Rolls - 
Water Works - 

Hose, Pipes and repairs of same 
Telephone - 
Express and Freight 
Horses and use oi same 
Shoeing - 

Veterinary and Medicines 
Hay, Straw and Grain 
Harness and repairs of same 
Furniture, etc. - 

Coal and Wood 

uas _____ 

Printing - 

Repairs on Apparatus and Houses 
Laundry - 

Cloth, Buttons and Badges 
Fire Alarm, repairs, etc. - 
Oil, Sponges, Brooms, etc. - 
Total Expenditures for the year 



$109,854 23 

420 05 

1,721 75 

254 81 

39 55 
2,384 57 
1,601 20 

332 43 

7,170 17 

679 65 

295 97 
2,908 21 

1,525 00 
203 50 

2,539 66 
119 12 

I9 1 S3 
283 29 

i>779 39 



$134,304 08 



Bal. returned to gen'l treas'y fund 



$672 75 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



SALARIES OF MEMBERS OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



Chief Engineer - 

First Assistant Engineer 

Other Assistant Engineers - 

Foreman of the companies (call) 

Call Men - 

Permanent Men 

Foreman of Companies (permanent) 

Engineers of Steamers (permanent) 



$2,000 00 per annum 

1,500 00 ' 

400 00 ' 

300 00 ' 

200 00 ' 

2 75 " day 

3 06 < 
3 00 < 



This department is divided into two classes, Permanent 
and Call. The Permanent force consists of 

Chief Engineer, 25 Drivers, 

1 1st Assistant Engineer, 15 Laddermen, 

1 Fire Alarm Operator, 6 Engineers of Steamers, 

28 Hosemen, 1 Driver for the Chief En- 
6 Patrolmen, gineer. 

A total of 83, of which 15 are Captains and 15 Lieu- 
tenants. 

The Call force consists of 



3 Assistant Engineers, 
25 Laddermen. 



65 Hosemen, 



A total of 93, of which there are 1 Captain and 1 Lieu- 
tenant. 

This makes a total of 176, divided into companies as 

follows : 

6 Steam Fire Engines, with Hose Wagons. 

5 Horse Hose Companies. 

4 Hook and Ladder Companies, 2 with Chemical Engines 

attached. 
1 Protective Company. 



6 ANNUAL REPORT 

The changes in the force during the year have been as 
follows : 

Appointed on Permanent force 4 

Appointed on Call force - 8 

Suspended -------- 2 

Discharged ---------3 

Transferred - - - - - - - 1 

Deaths - - k ----.' s - - - '3 

The apparatus is kept in the best possible condition and 
consists at present of six Engines, eleven two-horse Hose 
Wagons, one Babcock Aerial Truck and three Trucks of 
other patterns, two Chemical Engines, one Hale Water 
Tower, one Patrol Wagon and Sleigh, fully equipped, six 
Hose Pungs, eight Fuel Wagons, two Wagons and one 
Sleigh for use on fire alarm, one Wagon and Sleigh for 
Chief's use, one Wagon for Assistant Chief's use, and nine- 
teen Fire Extinguishers. In reserve there are three two- 
horse Hose Reels. 

Engine 3, after fifteen years of service, was sent to 
Manchester to undergo a general overhauling at an expense 
of $1,900. She has not been returned yet. This year En- 
gines 4 and 6 will have to be sent off for repairs. 

FIRE ALARM. 

This branch of service has been maintained in most 
excellent condition by the operator, Mr. H. C. Fernald. 

There have been two hundred and seventeen alarms 
given from signal boxes, and the No School signal has 
been given fifteen times the past year. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 7 

Connected with the circuit there is one ten-circuit non- 
interfering repeater, one ten-circuit cutout and testing switch- 
board, one slate protector, twelve galvanometers, ten bell- 
strikers, fifteen large gongs for engine houses, eight small 
gongs, seventeen indicators, sixteen electro-magnets and 
connections for opening stall doors, twenty-three electric 
light current protectors, one hundred and eighteen public 
and eight private signal boxes, one hundred miles of wire, 
the whole supplied with a storage battery of four hundred 
cups. 

There is also one large gong and indicator combined in 
the Police Station, one large gong at Pumping Station, 
Merrimack Square, Tower's Corner, and near the Northern 
Depot. 

An additional appropriation will be needed this year to 
extend the placing of wires underground. 

TELEPHONE. 

There are connected with this system twenty stations, 
consisting of transmitter, telephone bell and battery ; there 
are also twenty-two tap bells for the rooms of the Engine 
Houses, and about forty miles of wire owned by the city, 
under the care of the Fire Alarm Operator, except the tele- 
phones and transmitters, which are leased from the Tele- 
phone Company. The ringing line is supplied by a storage 
battery of one hundred and ten cups. 

HORSES AND HARNESSES. 

There are fifty-seven horses in the service of the Depart- 
ment. Nine new ones have been purchased the past year 



8 ANNUAL REPORT 

to take the place of six that had passed their usefulness for 
this Department. There are twelve sets of double, ten sets 
of three-horse hitch harnesses, and four single swinging har- 
nesses of the Berry and Hale patents. 

PROTECTIVE DEPARTMENT. 

This department is maintained by the city and consists 
of six permanent men. They responded to two hundred 
and seventy-one alarms ; in service three hundred and nine- 
teen and one-half hours ; spread seven hundred and sixty- 
six covers, and used one hundred and thirty-seven extin- 
guishers ; raised two hundred and forty-five feet of ladders ; 
laid nine hundred and fifty feet of hose. 

Chemical Engine C, attached to Truck 2, has used fifty- 
eight tanks. Chemical B, attached to Truck 3, has used 
seventy-seven tanks. 

HYDRANTS. 

Thirteen new hydrants have been added and one changed 
the past year, as follows : The one changed was at the en- 
trance to the Massachusetts Cotton Mills. The new ones 
added are one at the entrance to the Massachusetts Cotton 
Mills, two on Amory street, one on the east and one on the 
west side of John street, one on Butman road, one on Dutton 
street north of the entrance to the Lowell Machine Shop, one 
on French opposite Kirk street, one on Hurd near George 
street ; one on Jackson street west of entrance to Lowell Ma- 
chine Shop, two on Merrimack square, one opposite the 
Prescott Mills, the other opposite Runels block, one on Ply- 
mouth street opposite No. 25, one on Warren street opposite 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 9 

Middlesex Company's office, the other one on Worthen street 
opposite the Merrimack print works. 

HOSE. 

The Department will need two thousand feet of new hose 

the present year, 
i 

FIRES AND LOSSES. 

The past year beat all records of this Department in the 
number of fires and alarms received and the amount of loss. 
The whole number of alarms were seven hundred and seven. 
Two hundred and seventeen were given from signal boxes 
(three second and two general alarms included) 7 , two hun- 
dred and seventy-nine stills, and reported one hundred and 
fifty-six telephones, twenty-seven automatic and twenty-eight 
exposures. The No School signal was given fifteen times. 
The largest number of alarms were given in November — 
sixty-six; January followed with sixty-five; April, sixty- 
four; and July, sixty-one. There were three hundred and 
twenty fires extinguished by chemicals alone, and one hun- 
dred and fifty-three where water was used ; the others were 
extinguished by other means or had been put out before the 
arrival of the Department. 

The whole amount of loss, except the reported ones and 
Huntington Hall, was $410,564.15 ; insurance, $1,389,074; 
paid, $320,099.88 ; loss above insurance, $90,464.27 ; valu- 
ation, $2,129,345.36 ; the reported loss was $6,761.69; in- 
surance, $11,027,262.35 ; paid, $6,761.69; valuation, $13,- 
285,175. 

There have been eleven alarms for fires out of the city, 
to. which some part of the Department has responded the 



IO ANNUAL REPORT 



past year, for which no insurances are kept — Dracut, five; 
Tewksbury, four; Chelmsford, one; Tyngsboro, one. 

January 9 an alarm from box 21 at 1.29 a. m., followed 
by a second, called a part of the Department to a serious fire 
in a four-story brick fire trap known as the old Odd Fellows' 
building, owned by F. N. Weir. The fire started from some 
unknown cause in the rear of the third story in a small room 
used as a kitchen and closets for uniforms. It spread rap- 
idly through the partitions to the large concealed space be- 
tween the monitor roof and ceilings. When the Department 
arrived the flames were issuing from the rear windows in the 
third and fourth stories, breaking through the roof soon after. 
Every precaution was taken to prevent the fire spreading 
across a narrow alley to the old City Hall building on one 
side, the Urban Hall building in the rear, and the Mechanics 
Bank building on the other side. By energetic work of the 
Department the fire was confined to the two upper stones, 
which were badly gutted. The building was occupied as 
stores, rooms and two halls. The recall was sent in at 5.12 
a. m. The loss was $21,014.78. 

January 11, at 5.33 a. m., a telephone was sent in for 
the Palmer street chemical for a fire in St. Patrick's church. 
When the company arrived they found more fire than they 
could take care of. It was reported that the box (325), near 
the fire, would not work, so the driver ran back to 125 and 
sent in an alarm from that box at 5.41. The electrician soon 
after examined box 325 and found it all right. At 5.50 
someone sent in an alarm from box 139. Soon after a gen- 
eral alarm was sent in. A good deal of unjust criticism was 
given the Department for this fire which was uncalled for, 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. II 

as the Department never worked harder to suppress a fire 
than at this one. The fire started from an overheated smoke 
pipe in the boiler room, the ceiling of this room and the ves- 
try being covered with a steel sheathing nailed to a seven- 
eighths inch furring, which allowed the fire to run in all 
directions. When the Department arrived the fire was burn- 
ing fiercely, and had been burning some time between the 
floor and sheathing, also had burned a large hole in the 
church floor, This was soon extinguished, and at this time 
the fire was evidently all out. In a few minutes sparks 
began to fall down the partition between the plaster and wall, 
showing that the fire had got a foothold in the large open 
space under the roof. At the same time the slates began to 
fall from the roof, which showed that the fire had been there 
some time. It was impossible to get water onto the fire, it 
being confined between the ceiling and roof. Efforts were 
immediately taken to protect the surrounding property, which 
consisted of a number of frame buildings, the roofs of which 
caught fire a number of times. St. Patrick's Home, a five- 
story brick building, occupied as a home for working girls ; 
the Notre Dame Academy, a large five-story brick building, 
separated only by iron doors from the church, escaped with- 
out getting a wetting. The recall was sent in at 12.52 p. m. 
A portion of the Department was kept about four hours 
longer pumping water from the basement. The loss was 
$160,765.10. 

January 12 an alarm from box 56 at 9.01 p. m., followed 
in four minutes by a general alarm, called the Department 
to one of the largest and most disastrous fires in the history 
of the city* The fire started from some unknown cause in 



12 ANNUAL REPORT 

the Fellows building, a four-story brick block on Middle 
street, directly opposite the Fire Department Headquarters. 
The three upper stories and one store occupied by the O'Don- 
nell & Gilbride Company, dealers in ladies* wearing apparel, 
furniture, carpets, etc. The other three stores were occupied 
by Welch Bros., plumbers; C. H. May & Co., electricians; 
and U. S. Tabor, billiard and pool room. Mr. Casey, 
bookkeeper for Welch Bros., was in his office writing. Mr. 
Tabor and some men were in the pool room. They heard 
what sounded like two explosions, one after the other. They 
ran into the street and saw flames coming out of the second 
and third story windows. They notified the men in the fire 
station. A visitor in the station, Mr. W. Kennedy, sent in 
the alarm. At that time the wind was blowing the flames 
against the fire station. The heat soon. broke out every win- 
dow on that side of the station. It had got a foothold in the 
fire alarm rooms in the third story and the window frames in 
the tower had caught fire. A desperate fight was made to 
save this building, as the city would have been left without 
any fire alarm protection. Very soon ten streams of water, 
handled by as brave a lot of men as any department can pro- 
duce, were playing on the building. In spite of the intense 
heat every man stuck to his post until all danger was past 
to this building. In about twenty minutes the walls of the 
two upper stories of the Fellows block fell into the street, 
disabling Assistant Chief Norton and several other men. 
While this fight was going on the fire had jumped across the 
narrow alley into the Bascom and Albion blocks. This could 
have been avoided if shutters had been placed and kept 
closed on the windows of these blocks, as the architect ha^ 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 1 3 

intended. These blocks were four-story brick. The stores 
in these blocks and